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So it's been driving me nuts that I don't know what this is. Any ideas?

It's attached to my battery and I think the wire (or whatever it is) runs underneath my center consle.

-d
 

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same as above
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yup hes right
 

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wtf are the first two pics? lol

EDIT: it kinda looks like the under-side of the passenger side dash; the wire should run under the carpet and to the amp (in trunk..)
 

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Don't put a fuse in there until you find the end of it. Or you'll have a Live (hot) wire that can ground on something blow the fuse or start a fire
 

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ELECTRICAL FIRES


by John Gardner





2.0 ELECTRICAL CAUSE OF FIRE
An electrical fire can be defined as a fire where an electric current or electrical fault is found to have been the ignition source. Some examples would be:-

a) Lightning strike -Where extremely high voltages and currents, for a few thousandths of a second, produce so much heat that surrounding materials catch fire and continue to burn.

b) Overloaded wiring - Where the electric current flowing in the wires exceeds the rating of the cables. The wiring heats up and melts the insulation and can set fire to flammable material nearby. Commonly found in flexible cords, or power board leads.

c) Loose wiring connections - The current flowing through the wiring encounters resistance at the connection and generates heat. This can start a fire in the wall at the back of a power point, in a wiring junction box in the ceiling, above light fittings or inside a switchboard.

d) Electrical "arcing" (or sparking) - Where wiring insulation has been damaged by an external occurrence, and which lets the copper conductors inside a cable just touch one another, or to just make contact with the metal case.

A small current will then flow from the "live" conductor to the neutral or earth wire, or, to the earthed metal case. The current will initially be too small to blow a fuse or to trip a circuit breaker, but because the contact area is also very small (a few strands of wire) the heat produced at this point can reach sufficiently high temperatures to melt or vapourise metals such as copper, brass or sheet metal. The localised heating will ignite combustible materials in close proximity and start a fire.
 

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ELECTRICAL FIRES
by John Gardner

2.0 ELECTRICAL CAUSE OF FIRE
An electrical fire can be defined as a fire where an electric current or electrical fault is found to have been the ignition source. Some examples would be:-

a) Lightning strike -Where extremely high voltages and currents, for a few thousandths of a second, produce so much heat that surrounding materials catch fire and continue to burn.

b) Overloaded wiring - Where the electric current flowing in the wires exceeds the rating of the cables. The wiring heats up and melts the insulation and can set fire to flammable material nearby. Commonly found in flexible cords, or power board leads.

c) Loose wiring connections - The current flowing through the wiring encounters resistance at the connection and generates heat. This can start a fire in the wall at the back of a power point, in a wiring junction box in the ceiling, above light fittings or inside a switchboard.

d) Electrical "arcing" (or sparking) - Where wiring insulation has been damaged by an external occurrence, and which lets the copper conductors inside a cable just touch one another, or to just make contact with the metal case.

A small current will then flow from the "live" conductor to the neutral or earth wire, or, to the earthed metal case. The current will initially be too small to blow a fuse or to trip a circuit breaker, but because the contact area is also very small (a few strands of wire) the heat produced at this point can reach sufficiently high temperatures to melt or vapourise metals such as copper, brass or sheet metal. The localised heating will ignite combustible materials in close proximity and start a fire.
www.reference.com said:
Fuse (electrical)
In electronics and electrical engineering a fuse, short for 'fusible link', is a type of overcurrent protection device. It has as its critical component a metal wire or strip that will melt when heated by a prescribed electric current, opening the circuit of which it is a part, and so protecting the circuit from an overcurrent condition.

A practical fuse was one of the essential features of Edison's electrical power distribution system. An early fuse was said to have successfully protected an Edison installation from tampering by a rival from a gas-lighting concern.

Properly-selected fuses (or other overcurrent devices) are an essential part of a power distribution system to prevent fire or damage due to overload or short-circuits. Usually the maximum size of the overcurrent device for a circuit is regulated by law. For example, the Canadian Electrical Code, the United States National Electrical Code (NFPA 70), and the UK Wiring Regulations provide limits for overcurrent device ampere rating for a given conductor, insulation material and installation conditions. Local authorities will incorporate these national codes as part of law. An overcurrent device should normally be selected with a rating just over the normal operating current of the downstream wiring or equipment which it is to protect.
Granted I'm not an electrical engineer, but I'd rather take my chances with a fuse.
 

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EG
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If you aren't using that wire, are you gonna pull it? That seems like a dumb spot for the fuse holder.
 

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Yes, let us know where that thing ends up at - curious. Most likely the trunk. If you redo the fuse mounting location and have enough length in the trunk, you could use the wire run and plop in a good aftermarket amp in (well, with a bit more wiring involved ;) ).

PM
 
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