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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone.

I have a 1993 Honda Civic del Sol Si that I have built for the occasional open lapping/road race events. Here's the current setup:

Suspension:
- Skunk2 Pro-S V2 coil-overs: 10K front, 8K rear springs
- Buddy Club extended ball joints
- Skunk2 Pro-Series camber adjusters
- Skunk2 Black Series lower control arms with red polyurethane bushings
- Black BWR sub-frame brace
- BEAKS 22mm Integra Type-R sway bar
- unknown manufacturer upper strut bar

Rims/Tires (track):
- 15" bronze Rota Circuit 10
- BF Goodrich Rival S 205/50/15 front and back

Brakes:
- DC2 front knuckles/spindles
- Re-drilled Brembo blank 11.1" Prelude SR-V rotors
- Integra Type-R calipers
- Hawk HP+ pads front
- Hawk HPS rear
- Russell braided stainless-steel brake lines
- 1" Integra Type-R master cylinder and booster

I'm going to get the alignment sorted soon since it's been a little while. The last time I had it done I had the front wheels set to 2.5* negative camber with a slight toe-in (I can't remember the exact degree) and the rears were set to 1.0* negative with a neutral toe. It's worked really well to date but I'm wondering if anyone has tried other settings that they've found effective. If I were to increase the rear camber I'd need to invest in a set of rear camber adjusters. The 1.0* seems to be the max you can manipulate the stock suspension.

Thanks!

Edit: corrected the camber setting - had the numbers wrong
 

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Camber - negative 2.5-3* fr, -2-2.5*rr is a good place to be, depending on rim/tyre size. Mine is about -3fr, -2.5rr

Toe front - if you want the front to be more responsive - add toe out, within the factory limit. Expect some uneven wear, rotating the tyres often is very good idea. For a specific, very slow track, with lots of corners, you can go toe out, out of the factory limit. The turn in will be amazing, uneven tyre wear will be significant (no matter what you do), but you will be quicker. Very sensitive steering wheel, is to be expected at high speed. Toe in will stabilize the front at high speed and make the steering feel less responsive. It really depends what you want to achieve. I personally go for toe out within the limit.
Toe rear - toe out will stabilize the rear at high speed. Toe in will make it rotate better, but migh make the rear unstable/prone to spinning at high speed. My pick is neutral. You have pretty stiff rear springs, (and 22mm rear sway bar?), to fight understeer, so that's a good place for you to be, imho.

Caster - that thing makes a huge difference. I'd look for a way to go with as much as possible, which seems to be about 5*. The limiting factor here are the oem cv joints running out of range at full left/right. The easiest way to get some, is to swap the L and R front upper arms. Ball joints (stock) are offset towards the front, once swapped they move slightly towards the back of the car, hence positive caster. Even this small difference in the caster angle is very noticeable, in a good way. Mine is about 4.5-5* iirc.

Strut bars - both front and rear are highly recommended. Any brand is good, as long as they are solid. You want to grab it in the middle, while mounted and shake it as hard as possible - any sign of adjustment bolts, brackets, or other elements, moving, wiggling, bending or other type of "give", will tell you if you have a good strut bar, or you are just carrying extra weight. One piece, home made/powder coated, works great for me.

Brakes - I don't know how long are the races you do, or how hard are they on the brakes, but if you are serious about results, you have to go with the lightest(usually small) possible setup (with well working/rebuilt calipers and excellent pads), that you don't overheat. This is unsprung, (some of it) rotational mass we are talking about. E.g. the difference in weight between 262mm rotor/caliper and 282mm rotor/caliper is ~3kg per side. The fastest circuit/time attack civic around me is running 242mm/ds3000 fronts and for a reason. The knuckles for the 242mm calipers are also lighter iirc. Immagine how much quicker you will be, if you loose say 6kg of unsprung, rotational mass, per side. The downside, apart from looks, is pad life. My pick here (considering weight of the car and hp) is 262mm rotors(10.3) with Wilwood DynaPro 4 pot/ndx blue stuff FR and 242mm rotors, rebuilt calipers/PBS Prorace pads RR. I am yet to test this engine/brake combo, but I believe it will be sufficient on the track, while not being an overkill. If I was under 200(maybe even a bit more)hp and under 1000kg, I would deffinitely try a 242mm front setup. It's all about having just enough brakes and not too much in reserve.

While on the subject guys, I'd like to know what's your experience with NOT running any sway bars. Is it possible to achieve a good balance just by using higher spring rates? 24mm front sway bar here, kW V3, but switching to 20kg/fr and 6kg rr, wondering if I could loose the extra weight. Hope op doesn't mind, it is for faster laps after all :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Camber - negative 2.5-3* fr, -2-2.5*rr is a good place to be, depending on rim/tyre size. Mine is about -3fr, -2.5rr

Toe front - if you want the front to be more responsive - add toe out, within the factory limit. Expect some uneven wear, rotating the tyres often is very good idea. For a specific, very slow track, with lots of corners, you can go toe out, out of the factory limit. The turn in will be amazing, uneven tyre wear will be significant (no matter what you do), but you will be quicker. Very sensitive steering wheel, is to be expected at high speed. Toe in will stabilize the front at high speed and make the steering feel less responsive. It really depends what you want to achieve. I personally go for toe out within the limit.
Toe rear - toe out will stabilize the rear at high speed. Toe in will make it rotate better, but migh make the rear unstable/prone to spinning at high speed. My pick is neutral. You have pretty stiff rear springs, (and 22mm rear sway bar?), to fight understeer, so that's a good place for you to be, imho.

Caster - that thing makes a huge difference. I'd look for a way to go with as much as possible, which seems to be about 5*. The limiting factor here are the oem cv joints running out of range at full left/right. The easiest way to get some, is to swap the L and R front upper arms. Ball joints (stock) are offset towards the front, once swapped they move slightly towards the back of the car, hence positive caster. Even this small difference in the caster angle is very noticeable, in a good way. Mine is about 4.5-5* iirc.

Strut bars - both front and rear are highly recommended. Any brand is good, as long as they are solid. You want to grab it in the middle, while mounted and shake it as hard as possible - any sign of adjustment bolts, brackets, or other elements, moving, wiggling, bending or other type of "give", will tell you if you have a good strut bar, or you are just carrying extra weight. One piece, home made/powder coated, works great for me.

Brakes - I don't know how long are the races you do, or how hard are they on the brakes, but if you are serious about results, you have to go with the lightest(usually small) possible setup (with well working/rebuilt calipers and excellent pads), that you don't overheat. This is unsprung, (some of it) rotational mass we are talking about. E.g. the difference in weight between 262mm rotor/caliper and 282mm rotor/caliper is ~3kg per side. The fastest circuit/time attack civic around me is running 242mm/ds3000 fronts and for a reason. The knuckles for the 242mm calipers are also lighter iirc. Immagine how much quicker you will be, if you loose say 6kg of unsprung, rotational mass, per side. The downside, apart from looks, is pad life. My pick here (considering weight of the car and hp) is 262mm rotors(10.3) with Wilwood DynaPro 4 pot/ndx blue stuff FR and 242mm rotors, rebuilt calipers/PBS Prorace pads RR. I am yet to test this engine/brake combo, but I believe it will be sufficient on the track, while not being an overkill. If I was under 200(maybe even a bit more)hp and under 1000kg, I would deffinitely try a 242mm front setup. It's all about having just enough brakes and not too much in reserve.

While on the subject guys, I'd like to know what's your experience with NOT running any sway bars. Is it possible to achieve a good balance just by using higher spring rates? 24mm front sway bar here, kW V3, but switching to 20kg/fr and 6kg rr, wondering if I could loose the extra weight. Hope op doesn't mind, it is for faster laps after all :D
FANTASTIC INFO!!!

There's a lot of really great stuff to work with. Thank you!
 

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Meat Popsicle
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2,918 Posts
My setup on a 91 CRX Si

-1.5 camber up front with just the drop from ground control coils

-2.5 camber in the rear with adjustable upper control arms

+5 caster with ESP traction bar


Can’t remember the toe settings
 

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Tape-R taper/driver
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574 Posts
Caster - 3-5º positive. More caster means stronger return to center while turning, but it also means more effort required for low-speed maneuvering (parking lots, etc).

Camber (f) - 2.5-3.5º negative. Tire and track dependent.

Camber (r) - 1.5-2.5º negative.

Toe (f) - 1/16-3/16" out. Tire, track, and venue dependent (autox? endurance race? track day?).

Toe (r) - 1/8" in - 0 - 1/8" out. Tire, track, venue, and driver line-up dependent.
 

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Here's our set-up. Keep in mind this is on a stage rally car that runs on gravel.
Caster + about 7 with a custom front core support and radius rods.
Camber 0 F and -2 R
Toe 1/16 in F 1/16 in R

We'd like more front camber, but the shell is wracked too much to make that happen with the amount of lift we need to have.
We run toe in front and rear to get some stability at speed on dirt roads. It gets really squirrely over about 60 (we hit over 90mph more than once in the last event) if we have any toe out on the front. For us, increased caster has more impact on turn-in than front toe.
 
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