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Just wondering, I have a 98 civic, that im about to turbo, and the dp has the bung way down right in front of the cat. I was wondering if i should weld in another bung closer to the turbo, so that my wb02 gets a better reading, also does having an atmospheric wg affect the wb02 reading?
 

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yea, just use that bung. you dont want to get your wideband too hot. i dont think its gonna get a different reading anywhere in the downpipe. dunno bout the wg tho. mines internal.



EDIT: welcome to d-series.org! i just noticed it was your first post.
 

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no the wideband rading wont change because of a open wastegate, or no rrouted into the exaust... no ur A/F ratios wont JUMP or give u a miss reading unless it is to close to where the exhaust ends.. i wouldsay dont put it closer than 6 inches away from the end of the exhaust so anywhere inbetween is good... then u should be good...
 

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Good info

kyle h. said:
as long as it's before a/the cat ;)

You can run it after the cat even, but your readings will change after the cat warms up.
^^ x2

Simple info, yet effective!
Mo rep for you.:done:
 

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R2.....Zap Balls
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right before your cat is the best place, just mount it where ever the instructions tell you to. Ryan has his like 10" from his turbo and hasn't had any problems
 

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The Master Fabricator
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Per NGK's website, you want the WB to be 10*the pipe diameter away from the motor.

http://www.ngk.com/afx/AFX Manual 2005.pdf

AFX Installation
Below are recommended guidelines for installing the AFR sensor. Some exhaust configurations may make it difficult to meet each of the recommendations exactly, and some compromise in mounting may be required. The sensor does not necessarily have to precisely meet every mounting guideline below to operate, but please understand that the
better you conform to these rules, the longer the sensor will last and the more accurate the results will be.
The AFR sensor should be located between 12” and 48” from the engine, upstream of any catalyst device if so equipped. The closer the sensor is to the engine, the more likely it will be overheated, possibly shortening its life. The further it is from the engine, the more likely condensed water will get into the sensor and thermally shock it, again possibly shortening its life. The sensor should be mounted at least ten exhaust diameters
upstream of the exhaust exit (ex. for a 3” exhaust pipe, that is 30”). If the sensor is mounted between one and ten exhaust diameters from the exhaust exit, the AFR measured will be leaner than the actual AFR by as much as 2 AFR at low engine speeds (i.e. less than 3000 rpm).
Make sure there are no leaks in the exhaust system, as this will create an artificially lean (higher) AFR reading. Also, install the sensor upstream of any factory air-injection if so equipped, as this too will cause a false lean reading. In turbocharged applications, it is recommended that the sensor be installed downstream of the turbine. This is due to the fact that the high pressures before the turbine can distort the AFR reading. Apply the same installation guidelines as described above, but take into consideration that the sensor needs to be downstream of the turbine.
The sensor boss requires you to drill a hole in the exhaust. A step drill or hole saw may be used. Weld the sensor boss to the exhaust so that it will position the sensor in the upper half of the exhaust, ideally between the 10 o’clock and 2 o’clock locations (see diagram on next page). This is to avoid liquid fuel or condensed water from getting inside the sensor and thermally shocking it.
 

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R2.....Zap Balls
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gpny, please tell me you cut and pasted that :lol:
 
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