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Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon all.. Before anyone throws stones... here me out on this one.. please :)

I have been doing research on options to configure the turbo drain line into the oil pan. I have been reading through discussions on other platforms (such as BMWs) where the stock oil drain plug was modified and used as the turbo drain entrance back into the pan.

Pros:
- Eliminates the need to remove and tap the existing pan. Simply modify the current drain plug or mock up a new fitting with the turbo drain line attached.

Cons:
- the line will likely fill with oil and remain full up to the oil level in the pan.
- Under heavy acceleration, cornering, etc.. the level of oil in the line can increase (I doubt it will reach the turbo exit location though... but I could be wrong)
- Added drain line length needed since the drain plug for my d16y8 pan is on the back side. (I am not overly worried about this though. just need to figure out how to adapt a fitting that can thread into the existing drain hole and wrap the return line around the driver side of the pan).

Alright.. those are my thoughts.. Any suggestions or advice for/against? Anyone done this and can recommend some fittings to use to make it work?

Thx folks
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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oil pan has to be removed to install stronger rods and pistons anyway ,,so why not just drill and tap so the drain is above the oil line and not have turbo seal troubles...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Going to run a low boost setup on the stock block. Know of some buddies who have pushed up to 220whp safely on stock internals. If I blow it, I blow it :)
 

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ej8
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Do it the way its suppose to be done.
Drop the pan, drill and tap if or use a bolt in fitting.

Makes no sense to do it wrong and blow the motor.
And makes even no sesne at all to not care about blowing a motor.

So end the end do it the correct way.
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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the drain plug is on the wrong side of the pan to do this.

with an $18 ebay -10AN bulkhead fitting, there's an easy and no-weld way to do it right the first time
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do it the way its suppose to be done.
Drop the pan, drill and tap if or use a bolt in fitting.

Makes no sense to do it wrong and blow the motor.
And makes even no sesne at all to not care about blowing a motor.

So end the end do it the correct way.
Guess I should have clarified my "blown motor" comment.. with my low boost setup, if I would blow the motor from that alone, then I guess it would be time for a new rebuild anyway. I would not be happy, but it would push me over the edge to do a built rotating assembly swap.

the drain plug is on the wrong side of the pan to do this.

with an $18 ebay -10AN bulkhead fitting, there's an easy and no-weld way to do it right the first time
Agreed.. after thinking about it some more, any hard acceleration run would prevent that oil from moving out of the drain tube into the pan since it is on the backside.

Sounds like I will be doing it the right way after all. Thx for the responses
 

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Why the HELL would you want to slow down the oil draining from the turbo?
Do it the correct way.

If you really want it easier, tap the dipstick hole, run your drain there.

Then run a d17 valvecover and dipstick if you are d-vtec or 96+ nonvtec
 

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Two men shy of a group
99 civic sedan ex
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Problem with that is they will always leak slightly and the nut can back off (maybe not with that set screw). I did this twice, first time I used aluminum -an fittings and after a year the bulkhead nut backed off and the drain became loose and I ruined a brand new clutch by getting oil everywhere, second time I used a steel fitting and "killed" the threads by tacking it with my welder after it was tightened down. This worked fine but I always had an oil mist on the pan, I then hit a rock and blew my pan up so I got a steel pan and fitting then just welded them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Thanks for posting that I might go that route.

Problem with that is they will always leak slightly and the nut can back off (maybe not with that set screw). I did this twice, first time I used aluminum -an fittings and after a year the bulkhead nut backed off and the drain became loose and I ruined a brand new clutch by getting oil everywhere, second time I used a steel fitting and "killed" the threads by tacking it with my welder after it was tightened down. This worked fine but I always had an oil mist on the pan, I then hit a rock and blew my pan up so I got a steel pan and fitting then just welded them.
Wouldn't thread lock solve the nut backoff issue?
 

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Not all threadlock likes to be around oil and a constant heating and cooling environment.

would need the kind of threadlock they use in transmission builds. Bone might know what Im talking about.

I read about it after watching a bunch of T5 rebuild videos on youtube
 

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94 Integra
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first time I used aluminum -an fittings and after a year the bulkhead nut backed off and the drain became loose
The straight version has a special-ish o-ring and even a jamb screw to keep the nut from spinning. Using hondabond for both threadlocker & thread sealant would help quite a bit too.

The first non-solid drain I used was just a T3 turbo-side drain flange. I used decent SS bolts (head inside the pan) & hondabond along with lock washers & lock nuts. It's stayed tight for the last few years.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
sounds like you made up your mind before you made this thread. Go right ahead and try to re-invent the wheel and post your results
Have yet to make up my mind actually.. While I am more leaning towards the recommended route of tapping the pan on the forward side just to eliminate risk, I still haven't seen strong evidence against using the stock drain plug. Have continued searching and I have found success stories with guys using the stock plug location (not necessarily on a d16y8 though).
 

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ej8
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Have yet to make up my mind actually.. While I am more leaning towards the recommended route of tapping the pan on the forward side just to eliminate risk, I still haven't seen strong evidence against using the stock drain plug. Have continued searching and I have found success stories with guys using the stock plug location (not necessarily on a d16y8 though).
doesnt work on a d16 motor with the exhaust on the front.
The line would loop and it will just cause headaches.

Now i do believe i saw a 8th gen si civic with the K20 motor using the drain bolt.
But if you look at that setup the drain line is high up and is about a foot long, so its kinda hard to backup.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
doesnt work on a d16 motor with the exhaust on the front. The line would loop and it will just cause headaches.
Yeah, I think I am just going to avoid the headache and eliminate risk and do it the right way. I do not want to put this full kit in, only to fail the turbo shortly afterwards. Appreciate the info.

On a side note, finished my gauge install this week in prep for the turbo. Modified and used a radio block-off plate:

 

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D-series SoCal Division
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Clean job on the gauge install. Personally I would of utilized the whole block-off plate incase future gauges were required.
 
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