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well a little update on the pcv system.. you should install a catch can on the line off the valve cover.. i have noticed a little more oil from that line.. i really dont notice any oil lost like at the dipstick .. but i just thought id tell you about the oil from the valve cover.. im thinking its just because the crankcase is breathing more and thats why its doing that.. i guess thats why the endyn kit is a drain back system because it spits out more oil than usual..


just installed my catch can on the valve cover line!! either im cheap or broke but im using a pepsi bottle for my catch can.. its put to the side so you cant see it but it works!! not really anything in there after a days worth of beating on the car.. the bottle looks a little misty thats it.. just run the line to the pepsi bottle and poke a 1/2" hole on the side of the bottle so the gas gets out but the sludge if any stays in there... ill take a pic if you guys want to see it but im sure you can figure how it looks...
 

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Its important to run colder plugs for turbo cars... A general good rule of thumb is 1 step colder per every 100 whp. For example if your car has 100whp to start with and you put on a turbo and get 200whp you should run 1 step colder plugs. On that same note if you get 300whp you should get 2 steps colder and so on...

Basic info about plugs found here... http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/spark_plugs/partnumberkey.pdf

I just wanted to add this about plugs for turbo applets real quick...

NGK = BKR7E is a V 2 step colder then stock plug
NGK = BKR7ES-11 is a regular 2 step colder then stock
NGK = ZFR6F-11 is a V 1 step colder then stock plug
NGK = ZFR6A-11 is a V 1 step colder then stock plug

Champion = RC9MC4 is a regular 1-2 step colder then stock

Stock for Civics are either... ZFR5E-11 BKR5E-11

5 is the heat range indicator. 2 being the hottest and 7 or 8 being the coldest for NGK only!


EDIT; I have used the Champion plug in my turboed car... I just ordered the NGK BKR7E's for my new turbo build.
 

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BKR7E =
(See the V at the end of the electrode?)

Applications for this plug are as follows:
ASTON MARTIN DB7 (2001)3.2 L6
ASTON MARTIN DB7 (2000)3.2 L6
ASTON MARTIN DB7 (1999)3.2 L6
ASTON MARTIN DB7 (1998]3.2 L6
ASTON MARTIN DB7 (1997)3.2 L6
VOLVO 850 (1996)2.3 L5
VOLVO 850 (1995)2.3 L5
VOLVO 850 T-5 (1997)2.3 L5 B5234T
VOLVO S80 (2003)2.8 L6 B6284T
VOLVO S80 (2002)2.8 L6 B6284T



BKR7ES-11 =
(now you don't see the V)

Applications for this plug are:
SAAB 3-Sep (2002)2 L4 B205R
SAAB 3-Sep (2001)2 L4 B205L
SAAB 3-Sep (2000)2 L4 B205L
SAAB 3-Sep (2000)2 L4 B205L
SAAB 3-Sep SE (2001)2 L4 B205R
SAAB 3-Sep SE (2000)2 L4 B205R
SAAB 3-Sep VIGGEN (2002)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 3-Sep VIGGEN (2001)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 3-Sep VIGGEN (2000)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 5-Sep (2003)3 V6 B308E
SAAB 5-Sep (2002)3 V6 B308E
SAAB 5-Sep (2001)3 V6 B308E
SAAB 5-Sep (2000)3 V6 B308E
SAAB 5-Sep (1999)3 V6 B308E
SAAB 5-Sep AERO (2003)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 5-Sep AERO (2002)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 5-Sep AERO (2001)2.3 L4 B235R
SAAB 5-Sep AERO (2000)2.3 L4 B235R

As you can see most of these cars are turboed.

The way I figure it, if its good enough for an Aston Martin then its good enough for my civic ;)!

EDIT: I understand that its tough to get these plugs from an over the counter parts store. If you go to any parts store and say you need plugs for any of the vehicles listed above they will get them for you. For example...

I went into the part store the other day and told them I needed BKR7E NGK's. They told me they couldn't look it up using that part number, and that they could only look it up through vehicle type. I then gave them the vehicle type... a 2001 Aston Martin DB7, they then asked... "NGK's or Autolight!" "NGK's Please!" I said, with a big smirk on my face. ;). I noticed that Advanced auto parts doesn't sell NGK's so I had to do it at NAPA.

Good luck peeps!
 

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piggy back / piggybacking

First the definition of piggyback in computer terminology...

"The gaining of unauthorized access to a system via another user's legitimate connection." (AFCERT Computer Glossary)



Now how it works...

You will have to have a secondary computer of some sort to feed the primary computer with data. For example Apexi SFAC, Turbolink, greddy blue box, Greddy E-Manage are just a few to start. These computers will wire into your existing wire harness going from various sensors to your Honda ECU. We all understand that most of these wires are running off of electronic signals from various sensors inside of your engine bay. These different signals (from the sensor and computer) are interrupted by the “piggyback” computer and given a new signal to fool the stock Honda computer and sensor into thinking something else (bear with me here)! Now the stock Honda computer and sensors react as if the piggy back wants it to.



Let’s get specific…



We will take your VTEC for example. Your VTEC sends an electronic signal to your stock Honda computer; we will call this signal 5 to make things easy. Keep in mind I don’t know the exact #s that the signal uses, to find these exact #s use a multimeter. So, back to the 5; we will call this signal 5 at idle when VTEC is not engaged. Normally when you accelerate past a certain RPM your signal will change lets say 10. This 10 means VTEC is engaging at 6,000 RPMS. In order to change your VTEC from 6,000 RPMS to 4,500 RPMS your piggy back computer will do a few things.



First at 4,500 RPMS it will interrupt the stock signal going from the computer to the VTEC sensor and tell it to engage using the new signal 10.


Second it will tell the computer that everything is okay by giving it the 5 signal so you don’t throw any engine codes.




Simple right? Well not really…



Where things get hairy is when you involve Fuel and Ignition multiplied by RPMS and Boost. This is why people say stay away from piggy back computers with lots of boost. Piggy back computers work well; well enough for changing your VTEC or Rev limiter. But when you try and change fuel maps and ignition maps things get a little crazy. Some times the piggy back can’t keep up with all the signals it’s taking in and processing and with a lot of boost and at high RPMS it could be catastrophic (trust me I know 1st hand, 18psi and 2 cracked pistons later).



Alternatives to piggy back computers?

There is ECU chipping… read about it here and thank Makku for making this up for us.

Then there is ECU replacement, AKA Standalone systems. Very complicated and super $$$, but if you have the money it’s a great tool.



Summary...

Piggyback computers are cheap (relatively speaking) for simple applications (VTEC or REV limiter) and a good alternative to a FMU or nothing at all. But when you spend a lot of money on a motor and plan on running a lot of boost (over 12 PSI) consider an alternative or take your chances (like I did, and lost)!



I hope this helps… Good Luck & Happy Boosting



If anyone sees and error, please PM me… Or if anyone has something to add, do it!
 

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so how about setting it up like this

 

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lkailburn said:
so how about setting it up like this


well if you do it like that then you dont need the line with the check valve going to the manifold.. since you have the catch can hooked to a slash cut in the exhaust it has vacuum at ALL times and is actually a way i have wanted to do for a long time i just never got around to do it..

nice picture..
 

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i just installed mine using the saab pcv, and a catch can from road race engineering, i figured i'd post pics to give you guys a visual, it was incredibly easy to install. i plugged the saab pcv in place of the stocker on the intake manifold. ran a vacuum line with a check valve to the stock vacuum location on the intake manifold. the larger outlet on the pcv i ran to my catch can on the left side, and vented the valve cover to the right side of the catch can. i'll give it a few miles and see how well it works...
 

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Detonation by rkcarguySI

NOTE: There is more to detonation then just this.... with that said...

rkcarguySI said:
Alot of people don't understand detonation, why it happens, and how to prevent it, so I'm going to post some valueble information here.

Detonation is caused by the internals of the engine becoming so hot that part of the engine inside the combustion chamber, gets heated to a point where it ignites the fuel/air mixture prematurely. This can cause backfiring, melt engine parts, and can put a rod thru your block. Imagine what happens on the compression stroke when the piston is 1/2 way up the cylinder pre-detonates the A/F mix. The momentum of the engine and the other cylinders pushing it means the engine isn't going to stall. The pressure from the ignition of the A/F mix has to escape somewhere, sometimes thru your rings, headgasket, or by forcing the piston back down and spitting the rod out the side of the block.

Some say that you need to add fuel, this may be incorrect. Depending on your A/F ratio you may be giving away horsepower by running a richer when some simple and FREE top-end preparation is all that's needed. When I built my first D-series Turbo, a JDM SOHC ZC(D16A6), I had the head surfaced, new head gasket, AFC hack, 450DSMs, and a custom turbo kit using a T3 from a Mazda Rx-7 TII. The first time I took it out to drive and floored it, it hesitated and then at the next stop started to steam out the exhaust pipe. When I went to compression test it I was rewarded with a gush of antifreeze from #1 cylinder. I was like WTF and spent the next day taking it apart to see what happened. Turns out when I had the head surfaced, it made the edges sharp, including those that were inside the combustion chamber. #1 Cylinder had a pretty nasty edge on it, and was where the headgasket failed. While I had to head off I took it to a friends to have him look at it, and he told me what I am writing here now. I placed the new gasket on the head and using it as a template some black sharpie marked the areas inside the sealing ring of the gasket. I used a machinist debur tool, kinda like a small knife that you pull along a sharp edge and it cuts it off. Do this carefully and don't take too much off to where your headgasket may leak. While you have the head off you can use small brass wire brush together with a vacuum to scrub any carbon off of the pistons and head. Lastly use the debur tool to take the edges off of the valve reliefs in the pistons, again using the vacuum to assure that none of the metal shavings get into the engine. Once reassembled you'll find you can lean out your set-up around 4-5%(results may vary), and enjoy more power, response, and dependability from your engine.
 

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More to add on detonation by Oscar (don't mind the spelling)

oscarmayer said:
one thing that you didn't cover that if you don't mind, I'd liek to touch on is piston preperation. You can and will have detionation at some point because of improper piston preperation when instlaling new pistons. you guys seem to sometines bag on me because i harp so much about endyn, well here's 1 big reason. they are the only place that ships to the customer properly preped pistons. they remove all sharp edges and swirl the surfaces so it won;t cause hot spots onthe piston which also lead to detination.

If your pistons are shinney and pretty when you install them, they are not properly prepped. You need to get a wheel sander on a dirgrinder or dremmel and sand any sharp edged down. not a lot, but enough to make it somewhat smooth edge. then the tops shoudl be lightly gone over to produced a brushed look onthe surface. this helps to heel the fuel from heating jsut 1 area of the piston up and causing hot spots during burning. i can't tell you every detail as I'm not an expert in the area, All I can tll you is what I've been trained since I was young about pistons and installing them.

Endyn does this for you already, so you don't have to worrie about it. This to me is worth the extra few $ over any other brands in my books. It's one more thing you don't have to do yourself and "hope" you did it right.

anywyas, good luck with your build guys.
 

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Here you go...^^^



Sonny7730 said:
What do I need to do to be prepared for boosting?
Well, It depends how much boost you're going to run. Are you going to go for fastest D in america, or a daily driver with a bit of pep??? No matter what engine you boost, some things you want to make sure are in good order are your fuel pump, fuel pressure regulator, oil condition (which shoud be checked regularly anyways) belts, and other mechanical parts. Just make sure the engine is in good working order before you put more stress on it. Make sure your ignition system is up to par for the boost. You can use the honda oem system, which is actually recommended. Except for spark plugs, which will be covered later. Make sure the head is in good working order, such as gasket, valves, even seals if you so feel. for the block, a compression test and leakdown test will greatly help you get prepared for boost. These are obviously not vital, but extremely important if you want extended engine life. some are more important than others, depending on engine life.
 
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