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1994 turbo hatch
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161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
who: me
what: a 70mm tb
when: now
where: honda tuning suite
why: because it was free and looks sick af

ok so i’m trying to continue learning how to tune, and i want to set the base map up as close as possible before the start messing with the actual tables. rn i’ve got the injectors calibrated, dead times, etc. but i don’t know what to do about the intake manifold/tb. should i adjust the map sensor scaling, or is there a table where i can adjust so hts will compensate for the bigger tb?
this 70mm is 56% bigger so it’s leaning out in random spots but mostly 0-5ish%
thanks
 

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Registered
93 Civic HB SI, 95 Civic HB CX
Joined
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2,406 Posts
who: me
what: a 70mm tb
when: now
where: honda tuning suite
why: because it was free and looks sick af

ok so i’m trying to continue learning how to tune, and i want to set the base map up as close as possible before the start messing with the actual tables. rn i’ve got the injectors calibrated, dead times, etc. but i don’t know what to do about the intake manifold/tb. should i adjust the map sensor scaling, or is there a table where i can adjust so hts will compensate for the bigger tb?
this 70mm is 56% bigger so it’s leaning out in random spots but mostly 0-5ish%
thanks
MAP sensor scaling is a static characteristic of your MAP sensor. Once figured out and entered, dont change it.

Slap the TB on and roll. There is no TB sizing table, you'll have to review the entire map again with data logging to see how the IM/TB has affected your fuel tables.

IF ENABLED, MAKE SURE CLOSED LOOP SETTINGS ARE DISABLED! Leaving them on will screw you over.

Do normal stationary warm up fuel corrections using the ECT modifier if it really changed that much for warm up (it probably won't have) but leave tables alone till at OT.

Once at OT, get the idle area of the map clean (again, only if needed) focusing on your wideband readings. Use ECT correction modifier as much as possible before adjusting the map. Use AFR logging if necessary to monitor over time as needed.

Then go for a normal drive, with AFR or Lambda overlay running and logging, whatever its called in HTS. Make sure you have setup your desired AFR vs Load lookup table already configured.

Then just add or subtract fuel from the areas needed to stay at/near your target.

Go for a few runs, tweak things, until the cells visited during your run align with your target AFR.

Once you make a single cell correction, if its significantly different then the neighboring cells, always make sure to interpolate in sections as well, to keep those neighboring cells in line.

In the end, you want the load/fuel line graph visual to follow a common shape. Ideally no rough bumps, no line crossovers at different load/rpm points, or large hiccups. Keep them all smooth, and she'll run good.

Then continue to tweak individual cells for perfection over time if you really want, but its probably not necessary. If you want part load perfection, configure closed loop fuel control to use your wideband and pick a desired AFR to stay at.
 

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Formerly weebeastie
Joined
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1,917 Posts
MAP sensor scaling is a static characteristic of your MAP sensor. Once figured out and entered, dont change it.

Slap the TB on and roll. There is no TB sizing table, you'll have to review the entire map again with data logging to see how the IM/TB has affected your fuel tables.

IF ENABLED, MAKE SURE CLOSED LOOP SETTINGS ARE DISABLED! Leaving them on will screw you over.

Do normal stationary warm up fuel corrections using the ECT modifier if it really changed that much for warm up (it probably won't have) but leave tables alone till at OT.

Once at OT, get the idle area of the map clean (again, only if needed) focusing on your wideband readings. Use ECT correction modifier as much as possible before adjusting the map. Use AFR logging if necessary to monitor over time as needed.

Then go for a normal drive, with AFR or Lambda overlay running and logging, whatever its called in HTS. Make sure you have setup your desired AFR vs Load lookup table already configured.

Then just add or subtract fuel from the areas needed to stay at/near your target.

Go for a few runs, tweak things, until the cells visited during your run align with your target AFR.

Once you make a single cell correction, if its significantly different then the neighboring cells, always make sure to interpolate in sections as well, to keep those neighboring cells in line.

In the end, you want the load/fuel line graph visual to follow a common shape. Ideally no rough bumps, no line crossovers at different load/rpm points, or large hiccups. Keep them all smooth, and she'll run good.

Then continue to tweak individual cells for perfection over time if you really want, but its probably not necessary. If you want part load perfection, configure closed loop fuel control to use your wideband and pick a desired AFR to stay at.
<------ This!
 

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Registered
1994 turbo hatch
Joined
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161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MAP sensor scaling is a static characteristic of your MAP sensor. Once figured out and entered, dont change it.

Slap the TB on and roll. There is no TB sizing table, you'll have to review the entire map again with data logging to see how the IM/TB has affected your fuel tables.

IF ENABLED, MAKE SURE CLOSED LOOP SETTINGS ARE DISABLED! Leaving them on will screw you over.

Do normal stationary warm up fuel corrections using the ECT modifier if it really changed that much for warm up (it probably won't have) but leave tables alone till at OT.

Once at OT, get the idle area of the map clean (again, only if needed) focusing on your wideband readings. Use ECT correction modifier as much as possible before adjusting the map. Use AFR logging if necessary to monitor over time as needed.

Then go for a normal drive, with AFR or Lambda overlay running and logging, whatever its called in HTS. Make sure you have setup your desired AFR vs Load lookup table already configured.

Then just add or subtract fuel from the areas needed to stay at/near your target.

Go for a few runs, tweak things, until the cells visited during your run align with your target AFR.

Once you make a single cell correction, if its significantly different then the neighboring cells, always make sure to interpolate in sections as well, to keep those neighboring cells in line.

In the end, you want the load/fuel line graph visual to follow a common shape. Ideally no rough bumps, no line crossovers at different load/rpm points, or large hiccups. Keep them all smooth, and she'll run good.

Then continue to tweak individual cells for perfection over time if you really want, but its probably not necessary. If you want part load perfection, configure closed loop fuel control to use your wideband and pick a desired AFR to stay at.
ok thank you this is great.
when i adjust cells, i’ve heard some people do it by row or columns? is that necessary or can i just interpolate after single cells and be fine ?
 

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4d EG manual rack/trans low n slow
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282 Posts
Hey mod, I believe this is a bot replying...
1. The crankshaft rotates, the piston moves from the top dead center to the bottom dead center, and the intake valve is opened at this time. Due to the downward movement of the piston, the volume above the piston increases, generating vacuum suction, and the fuel and air are atomized and mixed into a combustible mixture by the carburetor, which is sucked into the cylinder through the intake valve. After the piston reaches bottom dead center, the intake valve closes and the intake stroke ends.
2. Compression stroke At the end of the intake stroke, the intake and exhaust valves are closed. The piston moves from the bottom dead center to the top dead center, so that the combustible gas mixture entering the cylinder is compressed. When the piston reaches the top dead center, the pressure of the gas mixture can reach more than 1470kPa, and the temperature can reach 250℃-300℃. Combustion work creates good conditions. This stroke ends when the piston reaches top dead center.
3. Power stroke When the piston in the compression stroke is close to the top dead center, an electric spark is generated between the electrodes of the spark plug, which will ignite the compressed combustible mixture, and the combusted gas expands rapidly, so that the instantaneous pressure in the cylinder reaches 2940kPa-4410kPa, and the temperature reaches 2940kPa-4410kPa. At 1800℃-2000℃, under the action of high-pressure gas, the piston is forced to move from top dead center to bottom dead center, and through connecting rod, the thrust of high-pressure gas is transmitted to the crankshaft to make it rotate to perform work, realizing the conversion of thermal energy into mechanical energy.
4. At the end of the exhaust stroke, when the piston is pushed close to the bottom dead center, the exhaust valve opens, and the piston moves from the bottom dead center to the top dead center. The valve exits the cylinder, and when the piston reaches top dead center, the exhaust valve closes and the stroke ends. At the end of the exhaust stroke, a work cycle is completed. As long as the crankshaft rotates continuously, intake, compression, work, and exhaust can be cycled over and over again.
 
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