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You need a little more of a steady hand or better bits.. If you are using a carbide burr bit, dip it in varsol every once in awhile that helps it cut. Spend more time on the top half of the port this is where it will help most.

Good job.. you are 3 percent done haha!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll get some using a light tomorrow . Which ones aren't in focus ? The bottom two are focused on the back of the port
 

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Classic Man
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I'll get some using a light tomorrow . Which ones aren't in focus ? The bottom two are focused on the back of the port
you mean the blackness? hmm i guess thats what im talking about. hehee

as mentioned above, if you want to remove any aluminum, remove it from the top to give the bend a better radius for the mixture to follow.

otherwise i would just clean the "dingleberrys" inside and any sharp or overlapping edges.

imagine you are air, and think about the easiest path. kinda like a river. and remember the valve will only be open a bit during operation, so try to find good flow paths toward the edges of the valve seat.

that should give ya some stuff to think about :wackit:

:3dbiggrin:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
otherwise i would just clean the "dingleberrys" inside and any sharp or overlapping edges.

imagine you are air, and think about the easiest path. kinda like a river. and remember the valve will only be open a bit during operation, so try to find good flow paths toward the edges of the valve seat.
Cool thanks for the pointers . Rep for you both
 

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also make the intake side slightly bigger then the intake manifold its self, and the exhaust slight port the manifold to make it bigger then the head

reversion FTW
 

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You have to start somewhere . . .

On the small amount of honda heads I have ported, the biggest gains were in the bowl (around the valve guide) but you could also hit the seat or tear up the guide if you aren't careful so its a risk/reward thing on your first time out.

Go look at several ported heads (look for a 4v but the 2v v8 stuff shares the same concepts). On the exhaust port, the roof and bowl is the more important parts and on the intake the short side radius is the key.
 

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That head is ruined. You messed it at points where you shouldn't touch it (port exit), and leave the important areas untouched (valve bowls+seats and guide bosses).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That head is ruined. You messed it at points where you shouldn't touch it (port exit), and leave the important areas untouched (valve bowls+seats and guide bosses).
How is gasket matching it ruining it ? All I did was lay down a factory exhaust gasket and scribe it and match it
 

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How is gasket matching it ruining it ? All I did was lay down a factory exhaust gasket and scribe it and match it
Yes and that is very bad. It increases reversion. You need a step of several millimeters at exhaust port-header flange junction. IMO this is even more important on turbo engine with high exhaust backpressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes and that is very bad. It increases reversion. You need a step of several millimeters at exhaust port-header flange junction. IMO this is even more important on turbo engine with high exhaust backpressure.
Oh ok I understand what your saying now . Well I laid the gasket back on and I didnt quite match it the head is still a lil smaller so I think it will be ok .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Got the porting done . Still need to polish it all though didn't have the right bits so I'll have to get those tonight .











All I did on the intake side was clean up the casting marks



 

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For the exhaust ports use a flap wheel to smooth out the surface, then hit it with a rubber polishing bit. It should leave you with a smooth frictionless surface.

For the intake you can use a sanding drum to leave a slightly rough texture, which is suppose to aid in better mixing of the air/fuel.
 
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