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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, well since the motor is installed and I have to use a 6" extension/adapter to reach the oil pan bolts on my Y8...

I haven't found much help on the internet about this other than using a crowfoot which I am not using.

I am being told by a buddy that he things for every 6" of extension you need to add 5ftlbs.

I need to know because I am using a 6" extension on my torque wrench to reach my oil pan bolts which need to be at 8.7ftlbs...So do I need to set my torque wrench to 14-15ftlbs to compensate for the extension adapter loss?

Thanks guys,

- Andy
 

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Ok, well since the motor is installed and I have to use a 6" extension/adapter to reach the oil pan bolts on my Y8...

I haven't found much help on the internet about this other than using a crowfoot which I am not using.

I am being told by a buddy that he things for every 6" of extension you need to add 5ftlbs.

I need to know because I am using a 6" extension on my torque wrench to reach my oil pan bolts which need to be at 8.7ftlbs...So do I need to set my torque wrench to 14-15ftlbs to compensate for the extension adapter loss?

Thanks guys,

- Andy
I would get a 3/8ths torque wrench that reads in inch pounds for oil pan bolts. Since those torque wrenches are smaller they would facilitate the use of shorter extentions. But im not so sure if i would add an extra 5fp for every 6 inches.. on a small bolt like that i wouldnt even torque them since its very easy to snap them off.
 

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Your buddy is a dope. Take no notice of him.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
So any info how much to compensate for a 6" extension? That is all I need to know. I want to make sure the oil is on correctly and the gasket doesn't get binded or anything.
 

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rule of thumb is that your suppose to a 5ft/lb per 6"of extension but that really dont come into play untill higher torque amounts that will acually start to twist the extension and give a false torque reading cause the extension is deflecting causing the bolt to not move cause the extension is absorbing all the force. but in your case id use the 6" extension and set it to 8 ftlbs or whatever its supposed to be
 

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I wouldn't compensate any unless you know how much twist the extension actually absorbs or how much out-of-round/straight it is.

edit: hatchaddict beat me to it, sorta.
 

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The extension does not absorb anything once the twist is taken up. The only thing lost is the extra distance the wrench travels compared to the headof the bolt.

Do a little experiment. put 2 torque wrenches against each other and read each at a convenient setting. Are they both the same. Now put a long extension on one. Are they still both the same or if different, is each the same as it was. Just make sure you keep the extension perpendicular to the handle and on the axis of the bolt. Leaning the wrench over like by using a swivle head on the socket certainly can change the torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. :bigok:

Rep given where I deemed needed.
 

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Extensions require no adjustment. The only time you make an adjustment is when you change the distance from the handle of the tq wrench and the bolt. Like if you put an open end wrench on the end of your tq wrench to make it longer or shorter.
 

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The extension does not absorb anything once the twist is taken up. The only thing lost is the extra distance the wrench travels compared to the headof the bolt.

Do a little experiment. put 2 torque wrenches against each other and read each at a convenient setting. Are they both the same. Now put a long extension on one. Are they still both the same or if different, is each the same as it was. Just make sure you keep the extension perpendicular to the handle and on the axis of the bolt. Leaning the wrench over like by using a swivle head on the socket certainly can change the torque.
I'd imagine using a torque wrench to measure the torque of another torque wrench would introduce many variables. Just take it to someone that calibrates tools; they can check the settings in a couple of seconds.

It takes torque to initially twist the extension and hold that extension in a twisted state. In your description of the experiment is exactly where inaccuracies come from when using an extension; it's almost impossible to keep the wrench perpendicular without any external force.
 

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you do lose torque through extensions, although at how little the oil pan bolts need, I wouldn't worry about it
Extensions require no adjustment. The only time you make an adjustment is when you change the distance from the handle of the tq wrench and the bolt. Like if you put an open end wrench on the end of your tq wrench to make it longer or shorter.
:werd:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Extensions require no adjustment. The only time you make an adjustment is when you change the distance from the handle of the tq wrench and the bolt. Like if you put an open end wrench on the end of your tq wrench to make it longer or shorter.
Is what we call a crowfoot. And that actually INCREASES torque.
 

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You can use a wrench also, it doesn't have to be a crowfoot. Yes, it does increase tq... that's exactly why you have to do the calculation because the tq you are actually applying while using a crowfoot or wrench is going to be higher than what your tq wrench is going to indicate. (if you are extending your leverage, you can also decrease your leverage with a crowfoot or wrench, depending on its position.)
 

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I just hold one wrench in a vice and use a very short extension to do a quick and dirty calibration. If two wrenches read the same after one was calibrated, I call them OK. If after time one changes, I get both calibrated.

If you do the test with a short extension, like a 1" long square drive, then use a 12" extension, using your left hand to hold the alignment while pulling the wrench with your right, if you know what your doing you can get reproducible accurate readings. This is not opinion, it is the result of tests done many times to prove the point that the bolts that cannot be accesed without an extension, like head bolts on the ends of SBC heads are accurate and old VW air cooled crank case bolts are accurate and many spark plugs are torqued accurately.

If you do not hold the drive end of a torque wrench accurately over the axis of a bolt you will get inaccurate readings. Obviously the closer the drive of the wrench is to the bolt or nut being tightened the easier it is to be accurate, but with a long extension, despite the risk of inaccuracy, you cannot correct as you don't know how much or which direction to correct in as you don't know the actual offset you create if you don't support the drive end accurately.

My methods hold the gaskets in a 1200hp SBC at 10:1 and 44# boost and 9000rpm
 

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A crows foot is an open end spanner with a square drive hole in the handle close to the working end. You do have to correct for the offset when using them. I am pretty sure Snap Ons website covers it in detail.
 

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my dd has 1800 ftlbs of torque
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it woudl make a little sense if it were higher tourque
but imo shit dont have to be exact especially like oil pan bolts just snug em i understnad why like head studs and shit need to be tourqued but i would not worry bout being exact with oil pan bolts
 

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For sump bolts, I agree that you do not need to torque them. They are not that critical.
 
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