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Discussion Starter #1
so I came across this pump
New Electric Oil Scavenge Pump Remote Turbo Return Line - eBay (item 150557782178 end time Apr-03-11 16:19:15 PDT)

small, geared, and low power. and only $140-150

I was recently reading an online article on oiling for turbos, and lets be honest, the same oil that is great for turbos is not necessarily matched to your motor.


When I do my gas mileage build, it will be using a small turbo for that extra bump in torque that our hondas generally get from higher compression during economy builds.



combine this pump with an extra P/S reservoir, a small radiator style oil cooler, and a filter, and I think you could have a long living turbo getting only its best oriented oil.



search for the user sloK, he is the one who perked my interest when he posted a link to the turbo oiling article.


ADVANTAGES
-the obvious one being specific oil can be used
-no "adapters" or splits from the engine oiling system
-no modified oil pans!
-seperation of the oiling systems allows you to help maintain proper engine oil temps, since a hot turbo isnt adding any heat to it anymore
-less effect on engine oil means longer time between oil changes
-only need to change turbo-oil 1:2 or 1:3 engine oil


DISADVANTAGES
-extra cost, it can easily travel north of $250 overall
-less space under hood, though you could extend lines and mount it behind the bumper or on the crossmember (if manual)




Let me here positive and negative criticism!! Share your thoughts!
 

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I have been pondering this to for a while.

Looks like you got most of it covered. One thing i was thinking was that is you have the oil pump hooked up with a switch, you dont have to keep your car running after a hard driving to cool the turbo.
 

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It says it's a scavenging pump; so really just a "booster" pump. For a little more you can get a pump specifically designed to flow higher with higher pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was thinking of wiring two ciruits. one is a relay, and the pump is on with the car, and another that when the car/ignition is off, the switch Id mount inside allows control also.

Im not good with circuits and components quite yet. Much more research is required on my end before I am comfortable doing this
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It says it's a scavenging pump; so really just a "booster" pump. For a little more you can get a pump specifically designed to flow higher with higher pressure.

Turbos dont need hardly any oil pressure. small turbos like the one Im planning would probably be fine with even a 1 GPM pump making around 10-15 line PSI
 

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I'd still suggest a pump designed for pressure. You can get a Mocal pump for about $170 and specifically describes turbo cooling/pressure(vs. one that specifically says it's for scavenging). You don't want an ebay pump to fail on you.

If you want to run it as a cooling pump too(key off); why not hook up a second relay to a temp switch or something(or possibly even a turbo timer)?
 

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How are you going to control oil temperature? I certainly don't want a turbo trying to spool with thick, cold oil when it gets cold out.

Do you plan to run a separate filter, too? You'll need a pump that can push oil through a filter.

Are you going to compensate flow for the turbo spinning at different speeds?

I would just run a restrictor and leave it alone. An electric oil pump for something that depends on oil to live is not a good combination, IMO. I'd rather not kill a turbo because a pump pops a fuse or shorts a wire.
 

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nah, something that cost 170 bucks to control oil on my thousand dollar turbo... no thanks. all you need is bad relay switch or fuse to go out when youre driving around.
then it would be to late...
good thought thou.
 

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Using that mentality, the OE oil pump is about the same price(or less).

IIRC, most "external" turbo oil systems in race cars are using a multi-stage dry sump system, though electronically driven pumps are not uncommon at all.
 

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I work on large semi truck engines every day, i see thousands of different trucks a week and see alot of the changes that the engines have gone through from the noisy and simple early detroit engines to the most advanced cummins ISX and detroit DD15 engines. One thing they all have in common is they all use lube oil from the engine to lubricate the turbos and even to actuate the VGT mechanism. I have yet to see a separate oiling system for the turbo and you would think that if a company is trying to get every single mile they can squeeze out of a rebuild on an engine they would do this if it made such a huge difference.

And you guys are griping about 1000$ turbos.. the holset and garret turbos on these monsters easily climb to the 2.5k-3k mark and get more than a half million miles on them before they need replaced/rebuilt.
 

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You have to remember there's a difference between OE oil systems and aftermarket oil systems. I mean, you rarely see dry sump on road cars but they're common on race cars. Even between the D-series there was oil-pump changes through the generations.

The main advantage I see with running a separate oil system with our engines is Honda designed the oil pump to provide adequate pressure with minimal loss/drag, "balanced". This creates a little more higher chance of oil pressure fluctuations causing problems. A separate system also reduces the chance of one component failure affecting another(say if the turbo's oil pump fails, the turbo may overheat but the engine will perfectly fine).
 

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You have to remember there's a difference between OE oil systems and aftermarket oil systems. I mean, you rarely see dry sump on road cars but they're common on race cars. Even between the D-series there was oil-pump changes through the generations.

The main advantage I see with running a separate oil system with our engines is Honda designed the oil pump to provide adequate pressure with minimal loss/drag, "balanced". This creates a little more higher chance of oil pressure fluctuations causing problems. A separate system also reduces the chance of one component failure affecting another(say if the turbo's oil pump fails, the turbo may overheat but the engine will perfectly fine).

i just dont like the idea. sure youre engine will be fine. but you would be out of turbo or rebuilding one because if one little fuses...
 

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I work on large semi truck engines every day, i see thousands of different trucks a week and see alot of the changes that the engines have gone through from the noisy and simple early detroit engines to the most advanced cummins ISX and detroit DD15 engines. One thing they all have in common is they all use lube oil from the engine to lubricate the turbos and even to actuate the VGT mechanism. I have yet to see a separate oiling system for the turbo and you would think that if a company is trying to get every single mile they can squeeze out of a rebuild on an engine they would do this if it made such a huge difference.

And you guys are griping about 1000$ turbos.. the holset and garret turbos on these monsters easily climb to the 2.5k-3k mark and get more than a half million miles on them before they need replaced/rebuilt.
see "I have yet to see a separate oiling system for the turbo" thats coming from guy that works on 18 wheelers.:smartass:
 

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I would much rather depend on the reliability of a mechanical pump than an electrical one.

I may be out of date, but I have only ever seen electric oil pumps used on gear boxes or diffs. All dry sump oil systems on engines have been mechanical driven either by the cam or by a belt off the crank.

Using an electric pump on the turbo is an expensive and doubtful solution to a non existent problem.

If you must try it, I suggest you first measure oil pressures before and after the restriction on a conventional system.
 

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see "I have yet to see a separate oiling system for the turbo" thats coming from guy that works on 18 wheelers.:smartass:
Refer to "OE vs. Aftermarket". Many manufacturers design their systems from the ground up, especially the diesel market which is usually ahead of automobiles in terms of engine technology.

The difference between an engine failure and a turbo failure is you can still limp home with a busted turbo!

Going mechanical would be more reliable but are usually more expensive(especially with our engines that rotate "backwards"); but I'm sure it's not a concern for those who track their cars(drag) and are looking for every last bit of power possible. Best method would simply switch to a turbo that doesn't rely on oil as much(ball bearing turbos).

I agree that measurements should be made before implementing such a system. Simply, because it's pretty easy and cheap to measure.
 

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The best way to remedy this situation is to remove the oil restrictor and install a regulator with a gauge on the regulated oil side. This way not only can you regulate the oil pressure but you can also tell what the exact pressure is. So in essence oil pressure from block>regulator/gauge>turbo. Not only that but you could also run very high oil pressures/volumes on the engine side now and not have to worry about the turbo blowing out oil.

This would also get rid of the very real problem of those oil restrictors becoming plugged with silicone or anything bigger than .030 and killing your turbo.

Im not trying to shoot the OP down but this has many cons against it and very few pro's.
 

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this is some great info guys. it would be awesome to have an external oil source. no more tapping oil pans and god damn tee's. some one try it soon to give us some real answers.
 
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