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Hard to tell exactly what it's doing but based on the description it sounds like "hyperbar turbocharging" or some variation of it.
I'm at school now so if I have a chance to swing by the library and find the book that defines it. If I recall correctly it had pictures as well.
 

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That's a straight up rally anti lag system ^

It diverts air from the charge pipe into the exhaust manifold, combined with an alternating misfire to put unburied fuel in the manifold where it can combust. This keeps it spoiled while out of the throttle.

The way he was describing it, I thought it was improving spool under load.
 

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So they're using some sort of external engine, assuming a turbine, that spits it's exhaust gasses into the exhaust piping to keep the turbo spooled up?

Sounds like a cool idea
 

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That's a straight up rally anti lag system ^

It diverts air from the charge pipe into the exhaust manifold, combined with an alternating misfire to put unburied fuel in the manifold where it can combust. This keeps it spoiled while out of the throttle.

The way he was describing it, I thought it was improving spool under load.
So your saying normal antilag with a intake cutout to air fresh air? Something like that?
 

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im gonna guess they just pump raw jet fuel into the exhaust manifold pre turbo. hah
sounds to me like an afterburner set up...

An afterburner (or a reheat) is an additional component present on some jet engines, mostly military supersonic aircraft. Its purpose is to provide an increase in thrust, usually for supersonic flight, takeoff and for combat situations. Afterburning is achieved by injecting additional fuel into the jet pipe downstream of (i.e. after) the turbine. The advantage of afterburning is significantly increased thrust; the disadvantage is its very high fuel consumption and inefficiency, though this is often regarded as acceptable for the short periods during which it is usually used.

...But its put inbetween the engine and turbo. it 1 heats the gasses for better flow, 2 heat causes expansion of the gasses and 3 is switchable. but i would what is being used for fuel. but then again he may just be running hobby jet engine teed onto the mani to provide extra flow.
 

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The difference is that a turbine normally runs lean, so you can add fuel to make an afterburner.
A reciprocating engine under load runs rich, which means there is very little oxygen left in the exhaust, so adding fuel will not create combustion in the manifold.

By introducing air, at higher pressure than the exhaust, you can then add some fuel (if its even needed) and then youll get the combustion in the manifold. This isnt new, its been used on rally cars since the 80s.

Heres the difference. In the 80s they just relied on the boost pressure bing higher than the the pressure in the exhaust manifold (because it usually is). Think of it as a BOV that plumbs into the exhaust manifold. So when you close the throttle the boost is diverted into the manifold, then with extra fuel in overrun you get intense backfiring in the manifold which spools the turbo. The spooling in turn keeps feeding into the manifold and it keeps going, so you can be out of the throttle for a while before the turbo looses speed.
If you watch a video of the old Group B cars and such youll hear them backfiring repeatedly for a couple seconds when they let out of the throttle. More than enough time to get back into the throttle and still have full boost.

This system is a little different. By using a check valve, when in boost you pressurize a container (the so called "rocket"), then when you want you can introduce that stored air into the exhaust manifold. So you can pretty much use it whenever you want. The only drawback is that you have to build some boost up first to get the reservoir up above exhaust manifold pressure, and of course you need some way of controlling it, which could be done as simply or complicated as you wanted it to. It appears the rally version used now is quite complicated, but I can see how to simplify it.

This brings me back to the "hyperbar turbocharging" thing. I first saw this term in some old book in my universities library. I tried to find it earlier today but I couldnt find it.
Basically, it was a system used on large engines, like stationary 2 stroke diesels (without using a supercharger), or in tanks and ships. The best examples I found were used in tanks.
Basically, the exhaust manifold connected into a sort of combustion chamber that contained a flame tube. Here boost pressure and/or air stored in high pressure tanks could be introduced. On a tank this was a nice system to have as it would eliminate turbo lag allowing it the accelerate suddenly, which I can image would be helpful in combat.
 

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well yes but lag is caused your turbo is basicly in a stalled state at idle and cruise, which is a lean condition right 15-18:1? but your right it would would right after an up shift, well maybe for the briff molement of leting of the throttle to shift.
 

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Even if you made it rich while you shift (pretty easy to do in the tune), its not going to act like anti-lag or an afterburner. You need a lot of air, hence why you need to bring some in from somewhere.
 

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A small squirt of NOS along with extra fuel to match will certainly do it. If you heat the NOS bottle to a controlled temperature, you get a known pressure far greater than any possible exhaust manifold pressure.

The extra pressure this creates in the manifold, acts to:-

1) Build boost by driving the turbine.
2) Do work against the piston on the exhaust stroke (ie apply load), thereby requiring more throttle for the same rpm and therefore more boost with the clutch disengaged.
 
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