Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
The Great Weldini
Joined
·
8,901 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Now I've been meaning to write this review but the damd Wifi in the hotel sucks, but i'll try.

So i work on the road a lot due to work and i stop a lot at Barnes and Noble to buy some books. i came across this book that impressed me.

The Chili Cookbook by Robb Walsh.



hey it's about chili why not. I loves me some good chili. Now as i began to thumb through the pages, yeah there's a lot of Chili recipes but what i notice was, this book was a bit different than most chili cookbooks. First off as i started reading introduction, it started explaining that this was going to be a history of chili. how it some what started and then into what a lot of us has come to know as chili, depending of what region of the country/world you live in. and Yeah Bone there's almost a whole chapter on Cincinnati chili.

In the beginning of the book it starts with the spice "chili". It breaks down the fundamentals of the spice what region the came from, how the evolve and even hybrid. It explain the high grade of chili to the common chili you buy in the supermarket and why and which chili is the "best" but it help you make you own assessment: plus make your own grind of chili season mix. Then it starts with where did it begin or where it began. as it goes through the USA country is basically explains why the chili in your region taste the way it does. i was surprise and blown away on the in depth of this. let me say that the way your chili taste the was it does is due to the immigrant that came to you area and adapted it to their taste. And depending on who it was, you can go to the region of that world and taste the chili you come to love but in a more primal or stripped down to the very bare basic flavors.

Now the book goes through the emotions of what is chili or the construct of it. Yes there's the argument of bean vs no beans, the type of meat to use, the different style of spelling chili and even a section on vegetarian chili. The author didn't want to do this section but did because over the years society has evolve and he has tried some pretty good vegetarian chili. there's so much more in depth to this book that i am pretty happy that i picked it up. there so many recipes from so many region that i'm not sure if i'm gonna try them all, but i'll try.

On one final note, there is one recipe beyond all in the book I must try. It is: Lobster Chili. (the picture below). Its been around since the Mayan were around, the difference is, the lobster wasn't from Maine and the corn was different other than that, its the same.



I want to thank you for reading this but most of all if you love chili this a book to pick up.



remo
 

·
endo_bobo
Joined
·
877 Posts
Fuckin A+ post. Sounds like a great book. I may shame my Texas brethren but I am in the with beans crowd. Ain't true Texas red but damn good. Might need to look at that book and give some pointers.
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,227 Posts
I have a simple ratio that I use...

1 lb meat = 2 cans beans = 2 can tomatoes, those cans being 14-16 oz, depending on how much they have shrunk.

I do the ground meat in 1 lb batches and to help the meat crumble evenly, I used this the last time



Since I make chili in large batches, I likely won't need to make any in 2016. I did a batch (5 lb meet) late 2015 so I'm could for a while. I did use 3 lb beef/2 lb pork IIRC but might be using more pork next time as beef = gout.

Cincinnati Style chili is just a greek meat sauce. Ever notice those Texans that don't like beans in their chili....don't have any horns either? Chili is a cheap food from left over scraps, beans were used as a meal extender much like rice is. If you notice most of my meals are depression era or war time era meals, how my families got through the slim times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Pretty cool, I'll have to check that out!

I like using a little cinnamon and unsweetened cocoa.
 

·
The Great Weldini
Joined
·
8,901 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I have a simple ratio that I use...

1 lb meat = 2 cans beans = 2 can tomatoes, those cans being 14-16 oz, depending on how much they have shrunk.

I do the ground meat in 1 lb batches and to help the meat crumble evenly, I used this the last time

Since I make chili in large batches, I likely won't need to make any in 2016. I did a batch (5 lb meet) late 2015 so I'm could for a while. I did use 3 lb beef/2 lb pork IIRC but might be using more pork next time as beef = gout.

Cincinnati Style chili is just a greek meat sauce. Ever notice those Texans that don't like beans in their chili....don't have any horns either? Chili is a cheap food from left over scraps, beans were used as a meal extender much like rice is. If you notice most of my meals are depression era or war time era meals, how my families got through the slim times.
yeah they talk about that in the book
Fuckin A+ post. Sounds like a great book. I may shame my Texas brethren but I am in the with beans crowd. Ain't true Texas red but damn good. Might need to look at that book and give some pointers.
its a pretty awesome book
Pretty cool, I'll have to check that out!

I like using a little cinnamon and unsweetened cocoa.
yeah its awesome
The differenece between Gold Star and Skyline chili here in Cincy.
again they talk about that in the book
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top