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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys.. Been Copped several times this year for speeding:) Would appreciate if anyone can recommend a decent priced IR gun detector &/or Laser jammer.
 

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they are expensive; my friend, who does high-end mobile electronic installs, put a jammer/detector in a new Audi s8(?) and i think it cost $2000+... it's very trick set-up; the system has hidden LED's in the dash to tell you if you are being clocked, everyhting is VERY well hidden...

I've seen the jammers for sale on eBay; i think they go for ~$700
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well Fella's.. The speed limit from my neck of the woods it 56kmph in the city limits and 70km outstation.. Is that a good enough reason to wanna have one lol

Anyway the I've lost by license 3 times this year to the cops- all 3 times for speeding. 68, 61 and 131 (Cops were quite amused) :)
 

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IIRC, in the US, Radar jammers are illegal, but laser ones aren't. Even then, laser jammers don't work from the review's I've read. Just invest in a nice detector(like Valentine1) and/or slow down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hmm looks like it maybe cheaper to pay fine. About 10 bucks a shot. We got just too race tracks that are open to the public. Both are 40km plus from home :(

Theres no law against Jammers.. just got to be careful with Customs.
 

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Jammers are illegal and heavily punished for having them.

Detectors are legal in most states good ones around $200 and up
Where, here in the US??

Maybe in a few states, but for the most part they are not.

Unless of course you can point me to some specific laws in regards to this, otherwise its just hearsay
 

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Did you see the case against them?
. SUMMARY OF THE FACTS

RMR manufactures and distributes the Spirit II radar jammer, a device advertised as making the user's automobile "electronically invisible" to "all radar bands used by police." Appellant's App. at 144. In an advertisement, consumers were advised that the Spirit II "receives a radar signal," then "blends the signal with white noise," and "confuses the computer inside the radar gun." Id.(1)

The FCC issued a public notice stating that the intentional use of jammers constitutes "malicious interference" with radar units used by FCC-licensed police and public safety agencies to measure vehicle speeds. Appellant's App. at 96-97 (informing the public that the FCC regulates radar jammers, which are designed to interfere with radar, but not radar detectors, which "are radio receivers tuned to receive radar signals and are used by motorists to provide a warning of any radar activity in the vicinity"). The agency warned that "[a]anyone using a jammer risks such penalties as losing an FCC license[], paying a fine, or facing criminal prosecution." Id.

On February 13, 1997, the Compliance and Information Bureau of the FCC issued an official citation to RMR prohibiting the marketing, manufacturing, or importing of the Spirit II. Id. at 13-14. RMR complied with the directive, but also contested the validity of the bureau's findings. It claimed, among other things, that the Spirit II is not covered by FCC rules regulating radiators of radio frequency energy because the device merely reflects a police radar signal and, by itself, cannot produce radio frequency energy.(2) See id. at 16, 21. In support of its theory, RMR provided test reports from independent laboratories. See id. at 40 (report of Diversified T.E.S.T. Technologies, Inc. opining that the Spirit II itself emits no radio frequency energy, and that without the use of a radar gun, the laboratory could not determine whether the device reflects RF energy); id. at 57-58 (report of HVB Consulting, Inc., stating that the Spirit II has no parts that "generate" radio frequency energy, but has the capability to reflect back "RF radiation"); id. at 105 (report of Ronald R. DeLyser, Ph.D., stating that the device mixes the radar signal "with either white noise or an FM chirp signal," then transmits back a "composite signal").

The Compliance and Information Bureau and the FCC Office of Engineering Technology reviewed the RMR submissions and rejected its arguments. In terms of FCC rules, the agency determined that the Spirit II is an "intentional radiator" that generates and emits radio
 

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10$ speeding tickets wow

ive had 2 passport escort 8500 x50's (ond was stolen) and i love them
 

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I have come cobra detector, i forget the model number, but it works pretty well for me. always lets me know when im approaching a cop using radar
 

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10$ speeding tickets wow

ive had 2 passport escort 8500 x50's (ond was stolen) and i love them
x2 wtw!!!!
i had my first one stolen as well (it was a s7200 i think) and now i have my x50 and its saved me from at least a grand or two in speeding tickets...
that still hasnt kept me from getting another $1500 in tickets though... im currently finishing up my yearlong probation for a 97 on a 65, and i still have another 6 months of probation for an 82 on a 45 in a construction zone with workers present (cop was a dick, cuz i was slowing down while entering the workzone, but entering it nonetheless)
 

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Where, here in the US??

Maybe in a few states, but for the most part they are not.

Unless of course you can point me to some specific laws in regards to this, otherwise its just hearsay
radar jammers are prohibited by federal law, including Puerto Rico

Radar detectors are legal, except few states that are also banned.

----The FCC issued a public notice stating that the intentional use of jammers constitutes "malicious interference" with radar units used by FCC-licensed police and public safety agencies to measure vehicle speeds. Appellant's App. at 96-97 (informing the public that the FCC regulates radar jammers, which are designed to interfere with radar, but not radar detectors, which "are radio receivers tuned to receive radar signals and are used by motorists to provide a warning of any radar activity in the vicinity"). The agency warned that "[a]anyone using a jammer risks such penalties as losing an FCC license[], paying a fine, or facing criminal prosecution." Id.---
 
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