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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been wanting to start a Shop thread, shop tools, and DIY shop tools thread for a while. Mine is actually in transition as we speak because I'm building a new shop. However, I'd love to see your shop, your favorite shop tools or specialty tools, and any DIY shop tools that you've actually made yourself or bought for a specific job. I'll add info as my shop gets finished. Right now its just a slab.
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Plant Sky Shade House Tree


And yes, alot of this work was DIY by me. I cut the trees, prepped the ground, graded it, put in a new pipe for the driveway, etc. I didn't form it up though, had that done. Floor is 6" deep with footers throughout. 12" footer on the outer edges on the back side. Ground prep was black plastic and then gravel. That creates an elliptical base (according to the concrete man). Same floor the old shop has, poured by the same guy lol, and it hasn't cracked in 10 years of use.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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1,978 Posts
The D series specific valve spring compressor I made after almost losing an eye using a C clamp and a socket lol.

I still owe you, Slo and robgoof your own haha (I was supposed to make them for Christmas presents, but had no time). I actually purchased the stock to build them all, just been extra busy with family lately and haven't had much time to be out in the shop for extended periods of time.

I'll get some better pics of the contraption later on. It works great though, takes a bit of time to move to each new location on the head and keep the moving pieces lubed, but is very safe. Key word: safe. I prioritized that over trying to be speedy.

For me to pull all the valves out of my head the other day took about 30-45 minutes, but I was also preoccupied with checking things as disassembly was happening too.
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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2,236 Posts
The D series specific valve spring compressor I made after almost losing an eye using a C clamp and a socket lol.

I still owe you, Slo and robgoof your own haha (I was supposed to make them for Christmas presents, but had no time). I actually purchased the stock to build them all, just been extra busy with family lately and haven't had much time to be out in the shop for extended periods of time.

I'll get some better pics of the contraption later on. It works great though, takes a bit of time to move to each new location on the head and keep the moving pieces lubed, but is very safe. Key word: safe. I prioritized that over trying to be speedy.

For me to pull all the valves out of my head the other day took about 30-45 minutes, but I was also preoccupied with checking things as disassembly was happening too.

slo and I must be on your naughty list eh....lol...


safe spring onner offers are nice to have...

speaking of safe, last scrap outing used a deep socket and hammer to slam some y8 springs off,,,good hard wack on the retainer and it all flys apart .:).

but I do have a real spring compressor ,it's gotta be from the early 70's ..
when I use it I can feel the spirit of the old mechanic that died while using it ..
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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View attachment 140321

And yes, alot of this work was DIY by me. I cut the trees, prepped the ground, graded it, put in a new pipe for the driveway, etc. I didn't form it up though, had that done. Floor is 6" deep with footers throughout. 12" footer on the outer edges on the back side. Ground prep was black plastic and then gravel. That creates an elliptical base (according to the concrete man). Same floor the old shop has, poured by the same guy lol, and it hasn't cracked in 10 years of use.
what, no heated floor? .....









:)
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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1,558 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So as I'm ramping up towards an eventual new shop, I've been picking up new equipment along the way. First up is the plasma cutter that I decided to take a chance on from Amazon. It had features that you normally don't find on cheaper plasma cutters. Most people rave about the Lotos cut50, and I even really considered the Primeweld cut 60 (more on why in a bit), but I eventually went with the few reviews I had seen for the machine I got. All of the Amazon welders and plasma cutters are basically the same, and they only go up in price as positive reviews come in and they prove legitimate. So here's what I ended up with:

Electrical wiring Gas Wire Engineering Tool
.

This is the Bestarc BTC500DP. The best feature of the whole rig is that it has pilot arc function so you don't have to touch the consumables to the material for it to strike the arc. It runs on 110 or 220 (I've only used on 220v), it again goes up to 50 amps which is sufficient up to 3/4" max steel and it ain't pretty when it gets that high. I used it today on some 1/4" thick 3" angle iron and ran it at about 38 amps. I also really like the post flow control. You can adjust that knob and it flows air after the cut through the torch to cool down the tip. I really has helped save my consumables. Especially today when I was dealing with some really rough metal. But with prices the way they are right now, I'll go dig through the scrap pile on the farm for 3" angle iron.

Here's what I was working with:

Footwear Shoe Wood Road surface Floor


Said cruddy metal. I learned my lesson though. The plasma cutter is much happier if I will hit the scale with the grinder first. Cuts were so much cleaner. This one was kind of janky because it was so crunchy.

And here's a shot of the crunchiness going pow while I was cutting it with the plasma cutter:

Welder Grinding Steelworker Light Welding


A friend took this pic and said, there are so many OSHA violations going on in this photo, I shrugged and said at least I moved the gas tanks to the other side of the shop before cutting lol............


Working on a DIY that I'll share in the coming days. But not till its done. Have a few other pieces of equipment I'll share as I go.

BTW, when I bought the Bestarc back in November the price was $175. Currently the Pilot Arc model is not available as they sold out, but the strike start is for $220

Amazon.com
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
cuts look alright..

how much air does it need?


I'm so tired of being raped up here.. $639.14 for the same machine...fuck

WHAT!?!???!???! I guess that's the communism tax that they add on? Check out a Primeweld Cut 60 for that kind of money. At least you get customer service!

CUT60 Dual Voltage 110v/220v 60-Amp Plasma Cutter

Normally between 50-70psi. I run mine at a little over 60 and it does great, but it does go through compressed air. I probably get 5-6 minutes worth of cutting before the 60 gallon at the old shop kicks on.
 
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93 Civic HB SI
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Rob's not kidding about the cost of things over the border. Gearheads born and raised in the US with access to the internet have no idea how much better access to parts and tooling prices/costs are down here.

Picture this, when I ordered my ECU, Demon2 and some other things from Xenocron, it was about $1300USD altogether. My duty tax bill was about $230CAD before the asshole DHL driver would even open the van door to unload the stuff. God that made me miss the USA lol.

In Canada, "free shipping" from sellers in the states also means paying a duty, that you have to pay when the delivery man shows up at your door, otherwise they hold the merch until you do. True non-duty goods are only like less than $150CAD, so its bullshit for car parts.

In the US, shipping from Canada into the US is duty free for goods that are less than $800USD. So you can receive a decent amount of stuff from Canada without being subject to duty.

Meanwhile, everything shipped within the US is truly free shipping and usually straight from china, so cheap and duty free.

'Murica
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So here's what I've been working on. I need a welding cart for the Bestarc Plasma cutter, the Primeweld MIG 180, and Primeweld TIG 225x that I purchased for the shop. I picked up a somewhat janky looking rolling cart from school that no one else wanted and thought it might make a good free welding cart with a little work.

Here's how it started life:

Wood Asphalt Composite material Gas Fixture


So my first thoughts were to add a tank rack to the back, move the shelving around a bit and boom, welding cart. And that's pretty much what I've done. I still need to fix a drawer under the one shelf, add a support to the back, and some hooks to the sides to hold my welding helmet and whips, but all in all, its ready to use now.

First started off mocking things up:

Kitchen cart Electronic instrument Wood Audio equipment Automotive tire


Then the real work began. The farm has a decent supply of scrap metal for fixing farm implements, etc. So I located some 3" angle iron to build that tank bracket out of. Figuring that I would use the existing bolt holes (mainly because of the Chinese metal used in the cart itself. Didn't really want to weld 1/4" to whatever this stuff is, so I used 3 bolt holes per side to fix the new bracket on. Here is the progression: Used the Bestarc plasma cutter to make my cuts, grinder to the smooth them down, and then welded it all together with the Primeweld MIG 180. (btw, if you've never heard of Primeweld, you should check them out. Most pleasant surprise I've had in a while as far as customer service and quality of the machines).

The nasty old angle iron:

Wood Waste Engineering Motor vehicle Plastic


Learned my lesson on this piece. The plasma cutter likes it better if you descale/clean the metal before cutting it.

Footwear Shoe Wood Road surface Floor


Now on to the design. Decided that I felt it would be stronger with a coped joint instead of a 45* butted joint, so I cut out the material on the first piece and then started tacking it all up.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Wood Automotive exterior Gas


Motor vehicle Automotive tire Wood Automotive exterior Bumper


The cope joint:

Wood Road surface Asphalt Floor Composite material


The Primeweld MIG 180, but seriously if you haven't ever heard of Primeweld, feel free to ask questions.

Automotive tire Electrical wiring Motor vehicle Engineering Gas


Welded it all up, working on my beads. I've done a lot of flux core in the past 10 years, and only borrowed or used a MIG in someone else's shop. It's so much stinking easier than flux core.

Automotive tire Road surface Asphalt Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior Cylinder
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here's an OSHA violation or two.............

Welder Grinding Steelworker Light Welding




My reply: At least I moved the two gas cans that were sitting right under the vice before I started. I forgot to last time..........hahahaha. JK, there were gas cans, and I move them every time.


One last shot of my attempt at welding up a tank holder.


Motor vehicle Automotive tire Bag Electrical wiring Gas
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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WHAT!?!???!???! I guess that's the communism tax that they add on? Check out a Primeweld Cut 60 for that kind of money. At least you get customer service!

CUT60 Dual Voltage 110v/220v 60-Amp Plasma Cutter

Normally between 50-70psi. I run mine at a little over 60 and it does great, but it does go through compressed air. I probably get 5-6 minutes worth of cutting before the 60 gallon at the old shop kicks on.

you so fuunny,,,,

cheapest in canada
on that chingky ass site YOU-buy.ca it's fucking 1200 + tax and 300 fucking shipping ..
 

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Formerly weebeastie
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Anybody ever put epoxy on their shop floor? Looking at the Rustoleum option because I'm on a budget. Any one ever used it before, or know of a budget friendly option.

Looking at Black with blue and gray chips in it. Thoughts?
 

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93 4d lx, z6,ported, port matched, compression bumped, balanced, manual swap
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Its all about the prep work, just make sure it says "resists hot tire pick up" and follow the instructions for prep and application, the texture add in stuff is nice to help prevent slipping and whacking your face on something 😀
 
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