Honda D Series Forum banner

send to machine shop or do it myself?

  • do it myself

    Votes: 11 91.7%
  • machine shop it is

    Votes: 1 8.3%

  • Total voters
    12
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
well im about to get the rest of the stuff for my bottom end, im just debating if i should have the machine shop asemble it or if i should do it myself. i know how to do it, and have built a couple engines before. but i do not have any micrometers, dial bore gauge, dial indicator, or a straight edge. so i will need to purchase this stuff anyway. and if any of the measurements are out, then i have to send it to them anyway. i think i might just send my crank out to them to make sure its all okay and get it micropolished, and send the block to get bored to the correct ptw clearance.

if i decide to build the bottom end myself anyone know of some good precision measuring tools that are not extremely expensive. i dont want harbor freight cheap but not mitutoyo expensive.

anyone who has had there bottom end built by a machine shop would you care to share what it cost you

thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
I built my engine myself and im so glad I did. its a great learning experience.

Take the block/head to the machine shop.
Have them hone/bore, check ptw
Resurface all of your mating surfaces
Hot tank
Micro polish/chamfer the crank

My shop did all of that for $215

The rest you can do yourself, assembly is easy as long as you can read (FSM)
you dont need any other precision tools other than some plastigauge (bearings) and feeler gauges (ring end gap) to check your clearances.

You said youve built engines before, why are you asking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
the reason i was asking is i plan to be building more then one engine in the near future. i was just debating if the cost of the tools vs the cost of the machine shop would be worth it. IMO plastigauge is cool and all and it does the job, but im kind of anal about when i put stuff together thus the need for the precision measuring tools. theres some things you just cant check with plastigauge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
well honestly i considered buying some of those measurement tools myself just for 1 engine lol.

but things like a dial bore gauge arent necessary since im sure you are going to have to take the blocks to be bored and/or honed at the machine shop anyways and they have all those tools and check those things regardless.

of all tools, a set of micrometers are definitively worth the investment. I have a set and they are extremely useful not only for engine building.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
a dial bore gauge is used for more then just checking your bore size. its also used for checking the big end of con rods, along with checking your main bearing caps. although ive never tried to do that on a engine with a full girdle. i wounder if you can even get it in there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
plasti-gauge, digital caliper from orielly's, and a feeler gauge. the plasti-gauge will tell you your bearing clearances, and the feeler will check PTW and can check endplay. you should check all the bearings with plasti-guage anyways. plasti-gauge is like a "well this is want the micrometer said it should be vs. plastgauge said this is what it is".

unless you plan on decking the block to acheive .000 deck height you shouldn't "need" the dail indicator but they can straighten it up and only remove .0001 from the low corner. then just make sure it doesn't have a negative deck height (it shouldn't unless something went wrong)
 

·
Registered
too many
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
follow the color code chart on the block and Honda's reference no need for expensive measuring tools. Plastigauge is like $2.00... or just buy ACL race bearings(cheaper than OE) and check clearances (ACL will always run loose, looser engine makes more power). as long as you did not spin a bearing no material should be taken off the crank or journals and stock bearing colors should work just fine. Most expensive things you need are a good torque wrench, ring filer, and assembly lube.

You will be surprised how simple it is.
 

·
Registered
92 Civic Hatch
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
follow the color code chart on the block and Honda's reference no need for expensive measuring tools. Plastigauge is like $2.00... or just buy ACL race bearings(cheaper than OE) and check clearances (ACL will always run loose, looser engine makes more power). as long as you did not spin a bearing no material should be taken off the crank or journals and stock bearing colors should work just fine. Most expensive things you need are a good torque wrench, ring filer, and assembly lube.

You will be surprised how simple it is.
This right here!

Honda engines are very forgiving....You dont need to get all crazy measuring cyl. taper, OOR and all that jazz...You can if you want I suppose but........

machine shop for your bore/hone, hot tank, notching. Just make sure they get your P2W correct and you'll be set.

Do the rest yourself with plastiguage, assembly lube, and a tq. wrench
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yeah I'm thinking thats the route I might be taking, using the plastigauge. I've just always used the tools when ive done it before and used plastigauge as a check of the measurements. The only reason I wanted the dial indicator was to check endplay of the crank. But I'm definitely sending the crank to get checked to see if it's straight, it's out of a block that shot a rod through the side of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
the machine shop still won't be able to check the endplay put you can slide it back and then measure the gap between the thrust washer and crank.

you will need a ring compressor also, be sure not to rent the torque wrench they have been used and abused and are incorrect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I wasn't sending the crank to the machine shop to get the end play checked. I know you have to have it together to do that. I've never used a ring compressor always used my fingers and a delicate touch. But I got myself a nich ft lb and in lb torque wrench from snapon sitting in my box at work. And I'm pretty positive I'm just going to do it myself now.
 

·
Registered
88 ED6
Joined
·
5,511 Posts
If you plan on doing this again(other engines, etc), and are willing to spend the money on tools, definitely do it yourself! If you can take it to a machine shop and just tell them what you want vs. them having to figure it out themselves, the turn around time is usually faster too.
 

·
\/ apply baby lotion here \/
'98 Civic 4 Door
Joined
·
11,260 Posts
you don't need too many fancy tools to put it together yourself.

Here is mine and my buddy's y8 rebuild:
http://www.d-series.org/forums/engine-building/134224-my-b18c1-rebuild-lots-pics.html

http://www.d-series.org/forums/engine-building/139135-d16y8-oem-rebuild-begins-pics.html

I had the machine shop take care of the cleaning, honing, cutting, resurfacing n shit and I put it together after it's all ready to go.

Get to it and make sure you take pics so you can show how it's coming along :TU:
 

·
Registered
the short bus
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
Do it yourself! Thats what I do. Just dont go loose on the bearing specs. Make sure theyre dead on. If theyre on the looser side your oil pressure will be low and the rod bearings wont get lubed correctly.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top