Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So, I'm in the middle of a head gasket change and cleaning up my block surface. I used a razor at first but couldn't get all of the gunk off, so I picked up some cheapo green Scotch Brite-style scouring pads plus WD40 to clean up the deck area around the pistons. Afterwards I read in a few forums that scotch brites can be a problem since they contain aluminum oxide, whose dust can get in the oil and trash the bearings. While my scouring pads weren't technically 3M branded, a quick gander on Alibaba shows most of the green scouring pads made do indeed have either aluminum oxide or silicon carbide in them, so I'm 90% sure I now have aluminum oxide contamination.

I was scrubbing by hand and only on the deck areas surrounding the pistons, so I imagine that the worst of it got on the pistons and cylinder walls. I tried to clean it up as best I could with WD40 and carb cleaner, but I'm worried some particles remain trapped between the piston rings, and possibly made it past the rings to drip down onto the crankshaft below. (I rotated the engine a few times, and whenever a piston went back down it left some green dusty residue on cyl walls - I cleaned these off until these didn't appear anymore)

Probably alot of dust got into the coolant as well, though since the coolant isn't lubricant I don't think it's as big of a problem as the oil contamination... right?

So my questions are: 1) Has anybody else use Scotch Brite to clean blocks/heads and ran into problems later on? 2) Any ideas how to get the Scotch brite dust out of the block, particularly if they may be stuck in the piston rings? My head is still off so I have full access.
 

·
BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
Joined
·
4,609 Posts
change the oil and filter

got for a drive

change the oil and filter

???

profit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Alright here's what I plan on doing... Since the head is still off, I'm gonna tape off the oil/bolt holes in the block, remove the water pump and maybe thermostat, then spray out the water jackets and cylinders with hose water. Hopefully this flushes out the dust contamination. If water gets past the piston rings, hopefully it mixes with the dust and falls into the crankcase where it sinks to the bottom of the oil pan (since water is heavier).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
WEll, what is wrong with the idea, can you elaborate? If I don't clean out the dust, I'm potentially looking at fried piston rings
 

·
Registered
89 EF 4wd sedan
Joined
·
669 Posts
The block is fine with water (it's aluminium), but the cylinders (walls/pistons/rings/crank everything else) are uncoated steel. Introduce them to water and the whole thing can be thrown in the bin.

Try high pressure air to get out what you can, you probably would've had a better chance before turning the motor over also spray WD40 to try and wash down the bits that you've moved around by turning the motor over. Then do as slo said, flush the oil and pray.
 

·
BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
Joined
·
4,609 Posts
atf in the bores. rotate engine by hand.

for shits and giggles seafoam


change the oil and filter

got for a drive

change the oil and filter

???

profit
 
  • Like
Reactions: EFB055

·
Registered
93 Civic HB SI
Joined
·
847 Posts
Have you checked the head for flatness before reinstalling? You might need to get it cut flat if its warped. That will save you the hassle of cleaning the head lol. Machine shop will return you a mirror finish surface.

I've done the scotchbrite dance hundreds of times, but have since moved away from using any kind of scotchbrite scouring products (cookies, pads, centipedes, etc.) on critical aluminum to aluminum sealing surfaces. There are better methods out there that do not destroy the precious finish of the head/deck, although they do require a bit more elbow grease.

If you've already started like it sounds, to get the gunk out between the top ring and piston, use chlorinated brake clean and a shop vac with a crevice tool. The brake clean will get the bits to move, and the shop vac will suck the fluid with the particles up. Do this in a WELL ventilated area, you could get dizzy from the fumes generated if your not careful.

Then oil/ATF the cylinder and top ring/piston gap right away. For good measure, stuff a clean rag down there to keep any more dust from getting in that gap. You can always wipe the cylinder clean, but its hard to clean that gap well if crap gets in there.

The block threaded holes for your head bolts, ive typically taken paper towel pieces/rips, and wadded them up and shoved them lightly into the holes to keep dust from getting down to the threads. Dust will stop at the paper towel, then when you're done, use the shop vac once again to suck up the dust and the paper towel bits in one motion. If you get the dust or lots of oil down in the threaded holes, you MUST clean these out. Use a "pump and suck" and more brake clean for this task:


You can also use the pump and suck to evacuate the coolant in the water jackets, which will get rid of the dust there as well.

Scotchbrite will create a surface that destroys the required 50ra or less surface roughness average that most MLS head gaskets require. If you're using a composite HG, or even a Felpro blue MLS gasket, you should be fine. Also, if using scotchbrite cookies in a die grinder, if you don't have a steady hand you can take too much aluminum off of either surface, to the point where the surface is technically warped and will need to be machined to fix. I only use cookies on steel parts anymore.
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,516 Posts
What do you consider a Scotchbrite cookie? I'll assume some sort of Roloc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Luckily the head has never been anywhere near a scotch brite. I did send the head to a machine shop, though the end result is not what I'd call "mirror finish", I posted about it here.

I think I already got most of it out just from wiping it off the walls after rotating the engine, but I'll also try the brake cleaner/vacuum just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,110 Posts
At home block machining should be done by hand, with oil, like WD40. Scotch bright in the bores is a great way to bust free the nasty carbon ring that can sometimes leave a small lip.

A block of wood on the sandpaper helps keep the deck flat, or you can flip it upside down and drag it back and forth a few times like the old timers.

MLS HG and ARPs.. Held 16 PSI with no overheating.. Backyard D16 built in a pile of gravel without plastigauge or a tq wrench,.

Yes, actually, you CAN torque rod bolts by hand.. Feel the stretch.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top