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91 Civic Wagon RT4WD
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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone taken the hub off of a Rear Trailing Arm belonging to a RT4WD Wagon and swapped it to the Rear Trailing Arm from a normal wagon? I need to do so because my Rear Trailing Arm is bent and I can't find another one that already has the RT4WD hub with a place for the axle to go. Just looking at the two rear trailing arms, it looks possible, but it looks like you have to pry the back plate (the plate with four holes in it and the spindle nut on top) off of the arm (the arm from the regular wagon), and then drill three holes through the rear trailing arm for the bracket (the RT4WD hub bracket) swap.
 

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EG8
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Not sure about the EF to civic (IIRC the CRX might use civic/integra arms)

But my AWD CRV arms are shaped the same as all of the integras/civics.

Idk about the dimensions, but the CRV is based on the Accord AFAIK.
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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Not sure about the EF to civic (IIRC the CRX might use civic/integra arms)

But my AWD CRV arms are shaped the same as all of the integras/civics.

Idk about the dimensions, but the CRV is based on the Accord AFAIK.
crvs are definitely civics underneath (it's why they made a B20 instead of dropping in an f22)

In more practical considerations, Honda was readying its first compact sports utility vehicle, the CR-V, which would be produced, including its aluminum engine, at the company's Suzuka factory, the home of Civic cars. In fact, the CR-V, though a considerably larger vehicle, belongs to the broad Civic strategy that the company was pursuing, and that would produce more variants and derivatives.
The CR-V, with good off-road capability, would need an engine with about a 2.0-L displacement. Honda's type F20A engine of the Accord family, with its width of 694 mm, would not fit in the shell, and comes from another factory source. The engine must be of the compact type-B family, for the sporty Civic and Integra cars. The type B16A 1.6-L unit, and the B18B 1.8-L version, shared the same block with with the engine's overall width of 601 mm. The B18B's 1834-cc capacity was obtained by stroking the B16A to 89 mm. Further enlargement to a planned 2.0-L capacity could only be achieved by increasing the bore of the B18B, however, the engine's high-pressure die cast aluminum block with separate iron liners left no room for such enlargement. Thus the development of a new one-piece cast liner unit with four integrally cast cylinder liners came about, which Honda describes as "consecutive liner construction," or "quad-sequential sleeve block." It is more like Siamese-quadruplets. With this liner construction, the web distance, or distance between the inner walls of the adjoining cylinders, could be reduced to 6 mm from the separate lines' 9 mm, while retaining the same bore pitch. This was the essential requirement so that the new block could be cast and machined on the existing Suzuka lines. This enabled the addition of 3 mm to the bore, to 84 mm which, combined with the B18B's 89 mm stroke, increases the engine's cubic capacity to 1972 cc. Further, the increase in block mass is only 0.8 kg, from the B18B's 25.3 kg to 26.1 kg. Efforts were made to shave mass from other internal and external components of the B20B, achieving the end result of a total dry mass of 144.5 kg for the new engine, to the smaller displacement B18B's 148.1 kg, making it one of the lightest in its displacement category.
 

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91 Civic Wagon RT4WD
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
What do you mean EF to civic?

What's the Accord AFAIK?

Do your CRV arms look like any of the pictures I just posted?

What year CRV are they off of?
 

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91 Civic Wagon RT4WD
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Discussion Starter #7
well, both arms are from civic wagons. Just one arm is from a RT4WD and One from a standard FWD
 

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Tape-R taper/driver
EC3, ED8, ED9, EE5
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Yeah, but 1G CRV have the same RTA for the 2WD, they just put a stub axle in to hold everything together.

The EE RTA seem to have the same outer shape, but the backing plate that is spot welded in place would need to be removed and the RT4WD backing plate welded in its place.
 
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