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EG5T
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Discussion Starter #1
Evening gents.
I am rebuilding a set of Lucas rear calipers (same as Nissin, but made in the Uk), for my eg. I'd like to remove this bearing, but it seems to be stuck in there. Tried to to torch the calipers a bit, didn't help at all. I am afraid to put more pressure on them, as I don't want to damage them. Any info on how to get them out, would be greatly appreciated. Ta
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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bearing puller?
 

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EG5T
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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I thought, but they both refuse to move at all. I am certain, that just a little bit of extra force, on top of what I am using, will damage them. They are needle bearings, in case it's not visible from the picture.

Slo, I don't have such a small bearing puller.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Is there a reason you have to remove it? Do you have a replacement bearing for it? If it really truly is seized, it will be pretty hard to remove without damaging it but not impossible.

It looks like the needles have some sort of metal or plastic cage around them. Usually if they roll freely with your finger, the bearing is OK. The only reason I could see you wanting to remove it is if you are replacing it due to it being seized, or you are going to powdercoat them and you need to bake the caliper in an oven.

If it's baking your concerned about, if the cage is metal you can clean the needles really good with pressurized brake clean spray to clean all of the grease/oil/brake fluid out from behind them and stick em in the oven. Even if the cage is plastic, it's most likely made of nylon or some sort of phenolic fiber/resin material. As long as you don't exceed 250 degrees F you will be fine, most powercoatings are set to cure at 200 anyways.

If you have a replacement bearing for it, just take a narrow point chisel and hammer, and beat the edge of the bearing inward to the center away from the bore wall. If you nick the metal bore of the caliper during removal, smooth the nicked area with a file or dremel tool until smooth, taking care to not gouge the housing then reinstall the new bearing.

If you're really set on removing that bearing, if you look at the picture you provided of the needle bearing where you can see the passage that the emergency brake connecting rod goes through to actuate the caliper piston, there are no needles covering that passage window. If you have or know someone with some fabrication equipment, build a rudementary slide hammer adapter out of a bolt and cut a notch into it that will grab the lip of the bearing case, then attach it to the slide hammer. Once you've built this, heat the caliper body up so it expands outward away from the bearing case, easing friction on at least part of the bearing. Then grab the slide hammer and adapter, hook the bearing lip and knock it out of there.

See the picture:

I've fabricated plenty of things for my slide hammer in a pinch, this should allow you to knock it out.
 

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Don't pull those out. They are "part" of the caliper and are not replaceable. I'm not sure how they are actually captured in the caliper but if you ruin them the caliper is junk.

I've run into a couple of previously reman'd calipers (aftermarket) that had the bearing replaced with a bushing, but there is not a replacement bearing available anywhere. If you're just rebuilding the caliper, get in there with brush and degreaser and get them good and clean, then regrease and reassemble as needed. They have a small range of motion and a very low duty cycle, so as long as the move fairly freely they will be fine. Good luck.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Don't pull those out. They are "part" of the caliper and are not replaceable.
I apologize to the OP, I'm glad spAdam has had experience working with/attempting to remove this bearing. From the pictures, it looked just like a case/cartridge type bearing that slid down in there and could be removed but thinking about the specifics surrounding that bearing, where almost one half of the overall circumference it is missing needles to account for the e-brake actuated piston push rod/connecting rod, there are a couple possibilities of the style of bearing it truly is. It is hard to tell from the pictures.

Honestly, looking back at the pictures now, it looks more like the needles sit in a machined/cast recess instead of it being a removable case/cartridge type bearing. If it is a groove style, I can visualize manufacturing of it: someone stacking the needles into the groove, using a bit of grease to keep them standing upright, then inserting a metal/plastic cage that sprung back into the recess retaining the needles. Sorry, without the part in hand all I can do is speculate but spAdam sure sprung to action with his clear cut recommendation: "Don't remove it". That's experience speaking right there :) I would follow that!

I'm not sure why that bearing is needing to be removed, but it would be nice to know the reason you want to take it out :) Again like spAdam said, If it's just cleaning and the needles still rotate OK, just use brake clean to thin any residue/junk buildup behind them and light compressed air to dry everything. Apply a light coating of clean brake fluid to the needles before putting everything back together.
 

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Asshole
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Sorry, without the part in hand all I can do is speculate but spAdam sure sprung to action with his clear cut recommendation: "Don't remove it". That's experience speaking right there :) I would follow that!
This is exactly why you shouldn't give advice on subjects you have no working knowledge of. Your advice could have caused a catastrophic failure resulting in serious injury or death. Please do not give advice unless you absolutely know what you're talking about, especially when it comes to safety issues such as properly functioning brakes.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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This is exactly why you shouldn't give advice on subjects you have no working knowledge of. Your advice could have caused a catastrophic failure resulting in serious injury or death. Please do not give advice unless you absolutely know what you're talking about, especially when it comes to safety issues such as properly functioning brakes.
Taking advice from anyone on forums, good or bad, can result in serious injury and death, as doing a good job is in the hands of the person doing the work. Anytime anyone does their own work on safety related components, they take their own risks.

The OP sounded like he had already been trying quite a bit to remove it, and he wanted advice on how to remove a bearing, so I gave him advice on how to remove a bearing. I did not know you're not supposed to take that bearing out, and the pictures weren't clear as to why.

The fact that spAdam jumped in and pointed out why you shouldn't is what a forum is all about, open dialog and free advice.

The service manual for the 92-95 civics show no procedure on how to remove that bearing, or if you are supposed to or not. I've never had to, but it seemed the OP really wanted to for some reason. That was the advice I gave.
 

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EG5T
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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not sure why that bearing is needing to be removed, but it would be nice to know the reason you want to take it out :)
I'd like to completely rebuild them, as I am sick of rusty and not properly working rear calipers.
The calipers from the pics are a second set, that I want to rebuild and swap around with my current ones.
I did try to use electrolysis, to get rid of all the rust, [email protected]/5A, but I was not completely happy with the result, as some spots had very thick rust, that couldn't get cleaned. I dropped them at a local sand blasting place, to clean most of the rust, then I will try to galvanise them, so they stay rust free for at least a while. I am mostly interested to clean the rust from the dust boot area, as that seems to be the hardest to do so and even if sand blasted/powder coated, the paint start to flake from said spot.

During the process and the amount of rust taken from the calipers, to the sacrificial electrode.


This is after the electrolysis, the exposed areas where I managed to wire brush, are very well cleaned, from the rust, but the tight corners still have some, hence they will be sand blasted.


Will let you gents know how they turn out.

A question for the knowledgable - what is a better metal, to be used for galvanisation - zink or aluminium-magnesium alloy?
 

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EG5T
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Discussion Starter #12
So I bought a rod - aluminium-magnesium alloy and did a bolt, while waiting for the calipers to be sand blasted. I wasn't very happy with the result, so decided to send them for zink plating. It was about $12-13, together with the postage, so why not. I am happy with the result, I believe it will last longer than powder coating(but can still be done with it, too). Brake fluid shouldn't be able to go under the zink, unlike the powder coating.

 
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