Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
Joined
·
637 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Pull your balls to properly clean your crank



I know this topic has been talked about some.
Some say it not needed, but I disagree.
The crank for a 4g63 is of the cross drilled design.

This means that there is an oil galley through both the main and the rod journal with an intersecting oil galley that joins the main to the rod. Due to the way the oil galleys are drilled, from the side of the rod throw to the main journal oil galley, the factory installs a press fit ball.



Now a segment of the intersecting galley is “dead space” this segment is from the cross drilled oil galley in the rod journal to the outside of the rod throw.
The common way to remove the ball is to heat it with a tig welder to loosen it, then weld a pull point on the ball and fight it out.

Once the ball is out, you will see the hard packed crud that builds up in the dead space.


Once you have the crud exposed, use a drill bit slightly smaller than the oil galley and drill the crud out, then a small copper brush and compressed air to get the rest out.
You will have 4 piles of crud.


A closer look of the crud from one galley.


So you can have an idea just how much crud is built up in the crank.


I believe that the solvent tanks and spray cabinets that a machine shop uses, also the cans of brake clean the DIY use, breaks down the bond that holds this crud in place and softens it so in a rebuild it gets washed when the engine is primed with oil on the stand, then the new break in oil picks up a small amount of the loosened crud and washes it into the new rod bearings.

http://www.d-series.org/forums/diy-forum/259361-how-plug-crank-oil-galleys-after-ball-removal.html
 

·
Premium Member
'92 CX Twincharged D
Joined
·
750 Posts
I remember seeing this done on Honda race cars back in the day. They would remove the balls, and install a plug instead so they could remove it easily and clean it out. Do you reinstall the balls?
When replacing with new balls or easy to remove plugs, do you have to re-balance the crank?
 

·
DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
Joined
·
637 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I remember seeing this done on Honda race cars back in the day. They would remove the balls, and install a plug instead so they could remove it easily and clean it out. Do you reinstall the balls?
I Tap and use set screws, then peen the edges, I do not want one to back out and kill an engine


When replacing with new balls or easy to remove plugs, do you have to re-balance the crank?
.

For the most part you are messing with less than 2g, so the balance of the crank is marginal.

I will do this before I have a rotating assembly balanced tho.
 

·
DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
Joined
·
637 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Is there any DIY method to remove these at home?

Also can you show how you re-install and plug the holes?

Thanks
The best way I know of to remove them, is to spark them with a TIG welder to shrink them a bit, then build some weld up on the ball into a pull pin, then grab it with pliers n cuss n pull them out.

I have a write up on how to plug them, I just have to find it, once I do Ill post it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,880 Posts
bogus, is the risk of that shit loosening up the real reason some of the old folk engine guys around me tend to soak their crankshafts in a basin of diesel fuel for upwards of a week?

Or do they do that for some other reason?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,880 Posts
Im talking about that sludge or debris built up, not the balls that are impossible to fall out
 

·
DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
Joined
·
637 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
That sludge will soften up when placed in a vat with diesel or chemical cleaner, ot even for the DIY'er trying to clean the crank with brake clean.

It gets packed by crank rotation, just like in a centrifuge.

Now once the chemical loosens it up, and you think it is clean because you do not see any more black goop on the paper towel.

You go bolt it in the block, Now the chemical is still at work, still breaking the sludge down.

So you finish the engine build, fire off the new build.. and just a few miles later, a rod bearing spins..

Why? the new oil for the build picked up the grit and sludge, and gravity pulled it down on the bearing when the engine stopped and the next start up slung it right into the bearings.


From another forum I am on.
clean 4g crank.jpg

This guy, doing his first build, read my post, and wanted to get his crank cleaned.
So he told his local machine shop to pull the balls and clean it.
They dropped it in a vat, and polished it and gave it back and told him there was no need to pull the crank balls, that it was clean and good to go.

The pic was taken after him and I talked and he took it to a welder and had the balls pulled out.

Sure looks clean to me........... :no:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
So do most d series cranks have these balls in them? I'll have to ask some machine shops around here about this. I doubt they even remove them.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top