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Be sure to check the tie rods boots and replace them if they have any cracks/rips...



 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
instead of fabbing a blockoff plate, couldn't you drill two holes from the case edges and use two parallel bolts to create a channel trapping the pin? I feel like that'd be easier than fabbing a plate
I suppose there may have been another way to prevent additional movement, but I wanted to delete the valve body completely. There's really no use for it once the pump has been removed and since it's just dead weight and the block plate was easy to fab I figured this would be the best bet.

Realistically the whole area doesn't need to be blocked off at all (I just didn't want dirt getting in there). All you would have to do is secure the pin from moving side to side. You could probably weld the pinion carrier to the rack housing or just secure it with a strap or other means as well.

I don't think the position it's secured in matters anymore since the assist is "turned off" permanently.

I know. You posed that link already on the first page. As I mentioned then, this link doesn't remotely address what I wanted to accomplish with this rack. Thanks for trying to be helpful though.

Be sure to check the tie rods boots and replace them if they have any cracks/rips...
Yikes!

Yeah my boots are fine, but this is good advice for anyone else that might be re-building their rack.
 

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This didn't take long to happen either. Drove threw standing water a month or two ago, all the grease turn to some mud looking sludge and left the rack dry. One hard turn and it stripped.
 

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Did a little DIY of my own lol. Didn't feel like spending any more money on parts so I used an old bellows boot as a spacer on my new manual rack.

 

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awesome write up, gonna give it a try over the winter seeing as no one will take a p/s rack back for a core when buying a manual rack
 

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awesome write up, gonna give it a try over the winter seeing as no one will take a p/s rack back for a core when buying a manual rack
Don't buy from a place that charges a core
 

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how's it holding up? i just picked up a crx shell and it has a 91 civic dx rack and pinion on. plan on doing this to the one i have instead of buying a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
well the modification that I did is holding up just fine. Steering feel is still nice and crisp and I don't have any side to side free play.

I am getting a clunking noise if I bang on the tie-rod ends but it feels like my rack guides are just worn out. Since I didn't replace them when rebuilding this I'm sure that's the issue.
 

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EG8
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I need to tear into my racks and do this.


Yea buddy, I got racks on racks on racks!

No really I do, I have 2 spare eg ones, and an integra (mine!). Then the one off my eg when I swap it with the tegy. Hit me up if you need one guys!

I'll post some pics of my own if the OP doesn't mind.
 

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Update:

After 2 full integra racks and much debate with Biggie.

We found out that the integra racks don't have this valve body guide setup. And has zero play powered or not.

So if you don't want to play with this setup, find an integra rack.

Maybe I'll get biggie to post up a video also.
 

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Update:

After 2 full integra racks and much debate with Biggie.

We found out that the integra racks don't have this valve body guide setup. And has zero play powered or not.

So if you don't want to play with this setup, find an integra rack.

Maybe I'll get biggie to post up a video also.
So swapping an integra rack and just loop it or???
 

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Actually I looked at the service manual and the Integra rack is like a conventional PS rack that uses a 2-piece input shaft (most are like this, the Civic rack is an oddball) that goes through a collar-like valve body. There isn't free play like the Civic rack because there is a small flexable torsion rod that connects the input splines to the pinion gear. Once it flexes enough, your movement of the steering wheel moves the rack. When the tires are up in the air there appears to be zero play, but with fat tires on pavement there will be play (or mushiness) in the first few degrees the wheel is moved either way.

I know from driving both types looped, the Integra is less prone to slop & banging over bumps. However when stressed, the Integra rack does the same thing - moves when it shouldn't. Unless you weld the two halves together via the valve body (like the Miata guys do), it will not truly feel like a manual rack.

I wish I had seen this thread before I spent all the time researching. The only issue is the 92+ racks have the valve body on the input shaft side, not the bottom. I hope to be taking apart a 95 EX power rack this spring and reporting how to best immobilize the pinion carrier. I'll try a plate like this if possible (it will raise the seal up the input shaft), shim the piston the pin moves, or machine a press-fit solid bushing in place of the lower bearing it rides in. I'm going to also remove the big piston on the center of the rack, as well as seal it by welding the tops of flare fittings like that other thread.
 

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Good call HiProfile. We were looking at the rack with no inner tie rods (No weight)...

So you're saying the slop isn't as bad, but there's still slop due to the flex?

When I looked at the integra manual it was a quick glance, and because it looked completely different I never looked into that diagram deeply... hmmmm...

I will need to look-up the miata thread again for that then.

But Biggie came from a pure manual rack with new guts. Hasn't driven the car much though because alignment+new tires.
 

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Here's the 3-part component I think has to be welded up, pic is from BiggieBert's Project THC:



Here's a pinion shaft from a Miata showing the welds connecting the shaft to the valve "collar":


Suspension How To: Power Steering Delete - Page 2 - Miata Forumz - Mazda Miata Chat Forums

From what I see in the service manual, the torsion bar is actually inside the 2 shafts. Below I made a picture from the service manual's diagram showing the different parts in different colors. The gold input shaft should already be solidly connected the top of the purple valve body. The blue shaft is the torsion bar, it is similar to the Saginaw gearbox torsion bars in the very last picture. It's what connects the input & valve body to the green pinion shaft. You'd have to weld the the bottom of the purple valve body to the green pinion shaft. You may have to remove the bearing & lower seal, then put the weld where the lower seal used to be. The seal isn't needed because it just seals the valve body from the rack tube.




I was recently researching more stuff for my 67 Firebird steering and the torsion bar used in the Saginaw gearbox is a lot more obvious. There are several thicknesses that result in different "effort" amounts, low effort feeling like a caddie and high effort feeling like a race car.



The input shaft on the right is connected to the torsion bar, and the torsion bar is what moves the gearbox parts. Imagine it twisting like a piece of licorice. The way this works is it turns the valve body before the internal gears, so the fluid gets directed to push left or right. It stays twisted while you're turning the wheel. Once you stop turning the wheel, the PS fluid untwists the torsion bar. That's how PS steering moves the rack only as far as you move the wheel. It even helps prevent wandering on the road since the bump or rut twists the torsion bar the other way, and some fluid gets applied in the opposite direction until it's untwisted & realigned with the steering wheel.
 

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Funny thing is, I've seen this pic a million times, and never realized that it wasn't a solid piece..

Interesting. So it acts as a damper essential, I can visualize it because I did take Mechanics of Materials/Solids... So the thicker shaft has more resistance.

The article says that the OP hit a curb and banded his elbow on the armrest or what not... That's intense!

Flipping back though the pics, This is how I understand the diagram... Is that correct?

PS, next time you make pics like this, save as a PNG(loss-less format) The JPEG(good for complex real life photos) wouldn't let me use the paintbucket in MS Paint, Boo...



I also wonder how much more play there is. Coming back to my "damper" denotation, I can see this as why the car feels as if it wanders, but also it technically reacts faster to the tiny amounts of bumpsteer than what we may be able to react to (instantaneously really).
 
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