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Ikillyoutillyoudiefromit
07 Si Sedan
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That's a sweet idea, I would like to see some HP numbers and some more technical data surrounding it. Pretty solid first impression though.
 

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i saw that about a year ago... interesting design, but I bet it costs a lot to manufacture.

if I remember it right, the "cam" contains dimples that let gas in/out. I wonder how that affects the c/r in the combustion chamber...
 

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98 Civic EX
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my friend said something about this, i'm waiting to see if car companies actually use some of this technology for some of the cars of the future, you'll see it first in the concepts at the sema and Detroit auto shows.
 

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Yeah, I actually was looking at that concept about three years ago..its fairly old. Its without a doubt a viable concept. There are so many advantages in that design versus the norm its rediculous.

I just wonder about the effects of when the port is partially closed. During an open state it is obvious that with no valve obstruction that your going to get more flow, but when the port is partially closed (which is essentially your low lift with a valve) it would create somewhat of an anti reversion effect. Maybe with a manifold to work with it it's possible to take advantage of that...maybe not. The deal is though, like with any opening event, you spend only once at peak lift (full opening in this case) per combustion cycle, but you spend two times at low lift (partial opening here). This is why working valve seat angles and backcuts on valves is so important...there is alot of impact from increasing low lift flow. Given the importance of low lift, the partial opening of this rotary port would be my concern. I would have to see an explanation on that before deciding.
 

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I wonder how long the bearings in the thing last because the combustion will impact off of the closed side of the "valve". The valve is not supported by the bottom of the cylinder head... it's sitting on a shaft sitting in bearings. I wonder if the stress over time... or higher c/r's will affect it.
 

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Premium Member
Civic turbo Hx/Ex
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18,609 Posts
vtecnitrocrx said:
Yeah, I actually was looking at that concept about three years ago..its fairly old. Its without a doubt a viable concept. There are so many advantages in that design versus the norm its rediculous.

I just wonder about the effects of when the port is partially closed. During an open state it is obvious that with no valve obstruction that your going to get more flow, but when the port is partially closed (which is essentially your low lift with a valve) it would create somewhat of an anti reversion effect. Maybe with a manifold to work with it it's possible to take advantage of that...maybe not. The deal is though, like with any opening event, you spend only once at peak lift (full opening in this case) per combustion cycle, but you spend two times at low lift (partial opening here). This is why working valve seat angles and backcuts on valves is so important...there is alot of impact from increasing low lift flow. Given the importance of low lift, the partial opening of this rotary port would be my concern. I would have to see an explanation on that before deciding.
This brings up an interesting point, maybe there are other smaller holes around the back to simulate the 2 half openings that a triditional valve cycle would have. Dono if that is what you are talking about but...
 

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Makku brings up another good point as well. All the losses associated with a lack of contact with the head can have consequences. I am also wondering about heat. Valves utilize surface contact to cool themselves and to reduce the possibility of creating higher combustion chamber temps..which in turn reduce detonation. The free floating nature of these would suggest that they would retain alot of heat. I wonder how much cooling effect they gain from the fact that they are spinning.

I can definitely see the huge gain in efficiency and loss of friction that these provide. I am just not sure that the constantly changing attitude of the port, coupled with the others points that have been made here, sell me on this design. I wish I could see some flow data, and more scientific evidence of the performance.
 
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