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Discussion Starter #1
Decided to make my own catch can setup designed for N/A. My routing will be nothing special, just putting it in-line between the PCV valve and the I/M; however, I think my design of the can itself should be pretty effective and efficient. At least I am hoping so.


Before I began, I made a few diagrams. This is the one I went with...




I added some particulate filtration in the form of stainless steel mesh and foam at the entrance to the outlet because I'm afraid of the steel wool breaking up and entering in the I/M. With past experience, I've noticed that pretty much all grades/coarseness of steel wool tends to break apart and leave plenty of fibers behind during use, and even during delicate handling. Since this is an N/A setup being connected to the engine as a vacuum source, I wanted to eliminate any chance of steel wool fibers entering the intake by fabricating a non-restrictive/degradable filter inside the can.


Below is the can I selected all taped off and ready to be cut. $5 at my local grocery store.





The can sectioned off...





Using my dremel and a cutting bit, I was able to make the holes the right diameter and roundness for the threaded fittings to screw in without the use of a nut on the other side.







Both fittings installed with epoxy putty.





Using a 0.019" thick sheet of aluminum for the basic baffling. Ready to be cut.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
The mesh was pretty easy to isolate and cut into useable pieces. It also held it's shape very well when forming/bending. Epoxy putty placement was easier than I expected.









Cutting, and placement of the foam with another layer of mesh on top was a little more difficult, but not too bad. I had to hold the epoxy in place and let it set up, which only took about 2 minutes.









Upon verifying that the mesh/foam/mesh filter was solid and in place, I went ahead and epoxied in the middle section. Probably used a little too much epoxy putty...





Was able to reach in just far enough to press in more epoxy putty to seal off the baffle, as I need it to be tight enough for the incoming gasses to move in a specific pathway through the baffle before it enters the steel wool media.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another shot. You can see the baffling, and the custom filter.





Finally ready for the steel wool. I stuffed in as much as I could. It's pretty firmly packed.





A layer of mesh to seal off the wool, keeping everything in place.







Installation of the final section.





And added another bead of putty to the fittings.

 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Sanded, and cleaned with rubbing alcohol to remove any sort of grease/oil/residue/dirt. Taped off, ready for paint.




Painted with RustOleum aluminum spray paint. This stuff is thick, covers very nicely.







And there you have it! Now I just need to figure out a good place to mount it in my engine bay. Also, I figure if the plastic cap begins to leak, i'll just epoxy in a block off plate along with a mechanical drain if needs be.

Let me know what you think!
 

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Looks pretty good, but I do agree that the foam from the paint brush should be something else (it doesn't hold up to oils well). More along the lines of the foam(s) used in some of the high flow air filters.

Also, bronze wool would eliminate the possibility of rusting, which could hasten the break down of the steel wool.

I do like that idea, though. Very nice use of the metal water bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Steel wool in a catch can is very unlikely to rust, especially considering it will be bathed in oil fumes. Bronze wool is more difficult to find and more expensive in finer grades when compared to steel wool. Finer grade = more surface area = better oil vapor filtration. Steel wool is cheap, reliable, and it works well enough.

The foam from the paint brush is rated for both latex and oil based paints. Oil based paints can have much harsher solvents than what is in my engine oil. It will hold up just fine.

Thanks for the comments.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Just to drive home exactly why I used the foam brush as a filter. I've worked with paints and paint related products for quite some time before starting my schooling/career in the medical field. Here is a simple test to prove my point with the foam paintbrush's ability to handle harsh solvents and oils.

First, the remaining foam sprayed with aluminum spray paint. The solvent in this paint includes toluene and xylene.



There is zero deformation/deterioration of the foam. Any imperfections seen are due to the fact that I've cut out half of the thickness on the other side of the foam.


To drive home my point further, here is another solvent known as Goof Off. Very similar to a slow drying lacquer thinner. Squirted on the foam after being painted.






As you can see, no deformation/deterioration present. Foam is still perfectly intact, flexible, and usable.





One last step further, the foam has been saturated with isopropyl alcohol. Here it is being squeezed out...





As you can see, perfect condition. No signs of deterioration or being dissolved.





There you have it. We've used solvents containing organic structures ranging from benzene rings to regular hydrocarbon chains. If the foam can handle this, it can handle anything my crankcase will be puffing out. I have full confidence in my filtration design.
 

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if you look into your intake manifold you will see oil residue unless the motors new its to let your motor vent without letting oil into the intake charge. every block has some sort of stock version of this ie hose from valve cover to intake or box on back of the bolck in later models
 

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1 Lifeline metal bottle
2 air compressor fittings
1 jb weld or similar epoxy
1 sheet .019" thick aluminum
1 foam brush
1 sink drain mesh
1 pac of steel wool
1 can of paint (color of choice)

Might not be a somplete list but this is what I can gather from this thread

EDIT: These can be used for NA systems to reduce the amount of oil residue in the intake system that usually gets vented into it, this filters it out. The main reason turbo guys do it is because the have a lot of pressure getting into the block and the stock PCV can't handle it.
 

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The design of the catch can is perfect. My only question is how well will the epoxy hold up under heating and cooling? do you feel it made a good bond to the aluminum?
 

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:popcorn:My crankcase vents through the oil passages in the block and go through a tube from the valve cover breather that shoots green boogeys on the ground
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The design of the catch can is perfect. My only question is how well will the epoxy hold up under heating and cooling? do you feel it made a good bond to the aluminum?

So far the epoxy is holding up very well. FYI, this is plumbers epoxy putty - not JB Weld. Even so, JB Weld would work just as well; however, it's just a little different to work with (ie goopy vs play-doh like).

There are no vacuum leaks in the can as far as I can tell. I tested it by plugging the I/M PCV nipple into the catch can. Start the engine, let it idle, then held my finger on the remaining catch can nipple. Can't hear any leaks.

All of the above being said, it seems like the epoxy bonds really well to the stainless steel/aluminum/brass that the catch can was made out of. So far it seems like it's been a good investment!

Hope this helps.
 
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