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2009 civic si
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Discussion Starter #1
Sometimes I feel like giving up...
My wife drives the 93 civic to work since it gets about 37mpg's, but here in florida having a/c is critical.

For a few years I was taking it to a local a/c guy, and it seemed like every year I'd have to go back in when the Freon leaked out.
He'd put another line or fitting or whatever in, recharge it...and this happened a handful of times...each time costing us at least a couple hundred if not more.

last time he had to replace the compressor, which he had just replaced the year before, and the bill was over 600.

So, we stopped going to him, and I bought manifold gauges and started to try and do it myself.

I bought a vacuum pump for a/c systems and pulled down vacuum. It held for an hour or so, but if left overnight would lose vacuum.

I knew there was a leak, so I put a bottle of Freon in with some dye and tried to find it...but couldn't.

However, even when fully charged, it doesn't blow cold. It blows cool....but not cold like all my other vehicles. I've yet to stick a thermostat into the vent, but it is obvious without that, so I haven't bought one yet....

I'm thinking it is possible that the compressor is bad again...but need to research how to test them before I jump to that conclusion.

I'm also thinking that maybe I should just take it into the dealer, and use factory Honda parts. It would be expensive, but at least things like the compressor would last longer than a year.

We have actually thought about abandoning it as her DD, buying her a newer car, and then me just slowly turning the eg into a track slut.

Anybody else have this problem with a/c systems in their older cars?
How do you all do it?
 

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Your gauges will tell you about the health of your compressor based on the pressures on each hose. Finding leaks isn't easy and slow leaks can take a while to appear. I hate doing ac work and avoid ac at work as much as I can lol, no fun to me.
 

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I use a refrigerant detector with a flexible wand and you stick the tip along the line, connections, etc... and if there is a minute leak it will chirp like a sob.
 

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2009 civic si
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154 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Change the dryer and expansion valve when the compressor was change?
Also small leaks suck but the civic system is small enough to be able to check all connections.
Also may sure fan is running.
I think the tech did replace the dryer, but don't know about the expansion valve...
I will make sure the fan is running.

thx for the tips
 

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2009 civic si
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Discussion Starter #6
I use a refrigerant detector with a flexible wand and you stick the tip along the line, connections, etc... and if there is a minute leak it will chirp like a sob.
that sounds awesome.
I'm going to look those up right now

thx!
 

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Meat Popsicle
91 CRX Si
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2,931 Posts
Just tear down the entire system, replace the O-rings, dryer, and expansion valve. Flush everything with AC flush (less the compressor), refill with oil and refrigerant and be done.

All of the above should cost less than $150 and if you have gauges and a vac pump, you have all the necessary tools.

Most difficult part (which really isn't THAT difficult) is removing the EVAP core
 

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2009 civic si
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154 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So I either have air in the system or it is overcharged....

I did pull vacuum down on it, but maybe when I disconnected the vac pump I did something to let in air


Thx for that chart
 

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2009 civic si
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Discussion Starter #10
Just tear down the entire system, replace the O-rings, dryer, and expansion valve. Flush everything with AC flush (less the compressor), refill with oil and refrigerant and be done.

All of the above should cost less than $150 and if you have gauges and a vac pump, you have all the necessary tools.

Most difficult part (which really isn't THAT difficult) is removing the EVAP core
I might just do that
 

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You should do that. The o-rings harden and crack, and that's after, maybe 5-10 years. All your rings that haven't yet been replaced are probably shot, and some of the ones that have been could be pinched/crimped or torn. Small pin hole leaks are very hard to detect, but quite common. Especially wherever a joint is.

The most important thing when reassembling is to keep everything as clean as possible. It might surprise you how badly a small fleck of dirt can screw up a system. Once done with the assembly, leave the vacuum pump on for a few hours, until absolutely nothing is coming out. A small amount of moisture will also screw up the system.
 

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2009 civic si
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Discussion Starter #12
You should do that. The o-rings harden and crack, and that's after, maybe 5-10 years. All your rings that haven't yet been replaced are probably shot, and some of the ones that have been could be pinched/crimped or torn. Small pin hole leaks are very hard to detect, but quite common. Especially wherever a joint is.

The most important thing when reassembling is to keep everything as clean as possible. It might surprise you how badly a small fleck of dirt can screw up a system. Once done with the assembly, leave the vacuum pump on for a few hours, until absolutely nothing is coming out. A small amount of moisture will also screw up the system.
I think the tech had rebuilt most of the system...after looking at the chart above, I think I have air in the system.
 

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ej8
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I think the tech had rebuilt most of the system...after looking at the chart above, I think I have air in the system.
Yea change all the oring, the dryer and expansion valve. Vacuum out the system check for leaks and then recharge. All should be good if your compressor is in good shape.
 

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I have the SAME problem... someone please help!.. I have a BRAND NEW, COMPRESSOR, Expansion Valve, Dryer bottle and A/C fan switch. Used a vacuum box and recharged. It Blows COOL...NOT COLD like my accord! Doesnt appear to have any leaks and O-rings are fine.......

But will NOT blow COLD. Shit is VERY FRUSTRATING. .. all new parts and its not cold at all. It almost seems that there is moisture in the system but I used the vacuum box for 45 minutes and thoight it was fine.....

Can someone help???
 

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You should put the vacuum pump on for at least an hour or two, and be absolutely sure nothing is coming out of it. Then, leave the system in vacuum for at least 3-4 hours. If it drops in that time, or immediately, then you've got quite a big leak somewhere. If you can leave it under vacuum for 12-24 hours, and it doesn't drop, even a little, then you're good. You want absolutely no leaks. And make damn sure you get 29-30 inHg vacuum. Anything less is not enough.
 

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You should put the vacuum pump on for at least an hour or two, and be absolutely sure nothing is coming out of it. Then, leave the system in vacuum for at least 3-4 hours. If it drops in that time, or immediately, then you've got quite a big leak somewhere. If you can leave it under vacuum for 12-24 hours, and it doesn't drop, even a little, then you're good. You want absolutely no leaks. And make damn sure you get 29-30 inHg vacuum. Anything less is not enough.

Ok will try this.
 

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Acura EL
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have you checked the coil on the inside? ive heard of leaves and debris making its way to that assembly and clogging it. this prevents the airflow from properly exchanging the heat and eventually builds up ice from the condensation. their are post on diy filter installs to help prevent this.

also a nitrogen pressure test would show a leak much easier than a vac test. do you leave your gauges on when you do a vac test? if you remove the gauges it will allow air in the system as the valves seal on a positive pressure not a negative. if you leave them on have you first soap tested the connections (under positive pressure) ?
 

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have you checked the coil on the inside? ive heard of leaves and debris making its way to that assembly and clogging it. this prevents the airflow from properly exchanging the heat and eventually builds up ice from the condensation. their are post on diy filter installs to help prevent this.

also a nitrogen pressure test would show a leak much easier than a vac test. do you leave your gauges on when you do a vac test? if you remove the gauges it will allow air in the system as the valves seal on a positive pressure not a negative. if you leave them on have you first soap tested the connections (under positive pressure) ?
Haven't did soap test and there were leaves and debris in the evap box on the core itself... CRAZY!!!..I DO NOT see how the HELL LEAVES and debris got in there!!..must be majic...lol!!!!!
 

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They usually fall in or get pulled/blown into the fresh air intake just behind the hood.

The only reason I said for you to do a vacuum leak check is because a nitrogen/trace gas leak check means you need access to nitrogen. It is most definitely the preferred method, as vacuum leak checking will cause moisture and contaminants to enter the system if there is a leak.
 

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They usually fall in or get pulled/blown into the fresh air intake just behind the hood.

The only reason I said for you to do a vacuum leak check is because a nitrogen/trace gas leak check means you need access to nitrogen. It is most definitely the preferred method, as vacuum leak checking will cause moisture and contaminants to enter the system if there is a leak.
Doesn't have any leaks. Took it to pepboys a week ago and they did dye test and others and thry found no leaks...
 
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