Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just got the car back together with new rings, bearings, water pump, timing belt, oil pump, clutch, trans. Basically refreshed the whole motor from what just happened a couple months ago with it nearly running out of oil. So me and a friend are driving it around trying to put some miles on the motor and clutch when we notice alot of steam/smoke coming from the engine bay. We head back to my apt immediately and pop the hood and apparently I didn't tighten the radiator cap all the way and it was just sitting there loose, radiator is dry and blowing steam out the hole. For fear of cooking the bearings or rings I put coolant in it and crank the car to try and circulate some coolant through the engine to drop the temps. It just spits hot steam out as I pour the coolant in. I pour and pour and pour, desperate to cool the engine. the coolant eventually starts turning green so that tells me the block wasn't completely dry, thank goodness. While looking for damage we notice that my Hondata heat shield gasket has gotten so hot that it started to change color from light to dark blue and bulge out from behind the intake manifold. I'm freaking out and check the oil and see it's about a half quart overfull. We wait a minute, and I drain the oil and sure enough there's a ton a water in it. I put some more oil back in it, get it started and notice that there are bubbles of water/coolant bubbling out from behind the exhaust manifold gasket. I pull the plugs and look them over and the color is normal but a couple are wet. I check the compression and it's 150-120-110-120. I realize that this was wasted effort but I had to try something so I pull the valve cover and check the torque on the ARP's. All the rears check out at 65 ft lbs but every....single.....front stud needed about a 1/4 turn to get it back to spec. I put the valve cover back on and re-do the compression test and this time it's 160-120ish-150-140. I decide to pull the head and me and a friend could not physically remove it. We use the allen keys to remove the studs and notice that a few of them are EXTREMELY difficult to turn. We finally get the head off and there's a ton of water and oil in the cylinders. Take a look at the head and I physically had to use a hammer and extension to get 2 of the studs out of the head. Here's a few pictures of the head gasket.
2017-02-19 01.34.33 by Anomolix, on Flickr2017-02-19 01.38.37 by Anomolix, on Flickr
2017-02-19 01.38.49 by Anomolix, on Flickr
I take a straight edge to the block and it checks out, .002 won't fit under any spot on the lines to check. I didn't bother checking the head because I'm pretty sure it's doneskies for sure this time. I can't get the studs back through a few of the holes in the head. Now my question is, what's the likelihood that I also fried my new rings? It got hot as F#@% but only for a few minutes. You may ask why I didn't stop immediately when it started to overheat and the answer is because I didn't know. My temp gauge in the cluster usually doesn't register until it starts to climb past halfway but this time it didn't at all so I was completely oblivious to what was happening. I realize this was long winded and drawn out but I wanted to be as detailed as possible so the gurus here could offer assistance. Thoughts? Any help/advice/magic honda tricks greatly appreciated.
 

·
Classic Man
Civic
Joined
·
16,355 Posts
Sounds like you really over heated the shit out of it. Not good. You can try to slam it all back together with a new head gasket but it might be done for.
 

·
BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
Joined
·
5,024 Posts
you should have poured water all over the outside of the engine. when my coolant line burst on my way to work, I went through a case of bottled water and poured that shit all over the head and block to cool it down. once the water stopped sizzling, I spent 5 more min pouring water on it and all is well in the world. cranking it causes more heat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,120 Posts
Cant fix bad practices with more TQ

Both sides gotta be flat and clean.

Too much timing for low octane will also blow it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cant fix bad practices with more TQ

Both sides gotta be flat and clean.

Too much timing for low octane will also blow it out.
I know. Head and block have a fresh resurface. Timing is 16 degrees base timing and 1.25 degrees per lb of boost on 93 octane.
 

·
Registered
97 EJ6 boosted D16Z6
Joined
·
1,079 Posts
maybe look at the temp gauge every now and then?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
maybe look at the temp gauge every now and then?
Maybe read the post? I'll explain it again anyways. My temp gauge is screwy. It would not read at all until it would get hotter than halfway, then it would climb with the quickness, it picked a great time to stop functioning completely. I didn't know the car was getting hot at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's a picture of my hondata heat shield gasket. I'll say, that fucker can resist some heat lol. I checked the block surface with my straight edge and luckily it's still flat. The head was not so lucky. It's warped so bad length wise AND width wise that you don't even need feeler gauges to see it. It's pretty bad. Around here junkyards are d series havens so I grabbed a z6 head from a 93 del sol. And now I'm back to waiting.

2017-02-24 06.11.36 by Anomolix, on Flickr
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top