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Discussion Starter #1
materials your will need

niddle nose pliers
screw driver not the flat head one
Electric sander or u can do by hand (real longer)
gloves
plastic putty knife
gurella hair fiberglass automotive filler
bondo auto filler
alot of time

I. Removal

first take off the old swide moldings
for the moldings on the fender . remove the fender trim and just put them out use the niddle nose pliers to remove the clips

for the door
remove the door pannel with the screw driver. 2 screw hold it up. one is inthe door handle and one in the arm rest (if you have power windows) or remove the clip that holds the roll up window lever. after that remove the moldings by un cliping the clips that hold the moldings.. or if you lazy get the hammer and the screw driver and jimmy it between the molding and the doo and rip that shit out of there

for the back section of the car
remove the plastick part that is connected to the seats the do the same with the clips

II. prep work

get you sander and sand all of the paint down to the metal. if you dont do it down to the metal you will get lifting after a couple of months because it will not stick to the paint as good as the metal. so do all of the area that the molding was at and about 2 inches on the top and bottom of the molding area

use distelled water or achcol to remove all of the debre and make sure it is very clean no greese or debre

III. fiberglass

put on your glowes
Open up you gurella hair and just start speading it on there with your hands... it will be driping down dont worry about that. keep putting it int there and use you putty knife to even it out... do not use exsevie amounts of it just enough to fill up the holes inside of the molding area
let sit for a hour

IV. bondo
put on new gloves( do not mix bondo and fiberglass!!!!!)
open bondo up and spead the bondo over the fiberglass and spread it as even as u can. let sit for a hour ( or read directions to see how long to let it sit) oh yea make sure u added the hardener to the bondo.

V. Sanding

Get your sander out (go buy one if you dont have one like 20 bux dont be cheap you get what you pay for)
start sanding to make it as even with the paint and make sure it is very even no lumps because u have to paint over this. so get it as even as u possibly can (or you should go to a body shiop and ask them to sand it down to make sure u dont mess up)

VI. your done
prime it out and get it painted
 
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Discussion Starter #4
my friend and i did this and its been about 6 moths and it hasnt cracked yet and its un painted and been exposed to snow rain and sun and no signs of cracking have been present
 
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Discussion Starter #5
tiger hair and bondo were made for a reason..to not weld, so the stuff will do the job.

Dxman, did u do this on your car, or would u do this on your car..thats the true test.
 

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if you want it to last weld it over but watch out because i was having a problem with the metal on the doors warping really bad as soon as you touch the welder to it so we used a nitrogen setup to keep the metal cool while welding it worked pretty good check out the showcase to see the trunk and door handles on my bros 94 ex
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I think he's talking about just filling the molding attachment holes - not the entire strip where the molding was. In that case fiberglass and bondo would be just fine. It's a very small area.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
JRI94 said:
I think he's talking about just filling the molding attachment holes - not the entire strip where the molding was. In that case fiberglass and bondo would be just fine. It's a very small area.
:werd: . For just the holes, I think bondo would do fine, if you wanted to fill that whole space where the molding was- weld in a plate.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
make sure u use something stronger then poly-resin.;. ie epoxy.. poly-resin tend to "laminate" and end up pealing off or bubbling..
 

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If you intend to do the whole strip, use cold-weld technique. Same principal for door handles. A friend did his rear handles with the hair/resin mix and it cracked a year later... a week after he had his car painted. $1200 paint job toasted because he prepped it the cheap way.
 
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