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Discussion Starter #1
How to remove a Broken Bolt

There are many different methods.

This is one of the more common methods using an EZ-Out


This method works best on bolts that broke due to being over tighten.
The EZ-out method has little success on cross threaded or rusted bolts.

The tools needed are few.


Drill
Proper size drill bit
A good sharp center punch
Hammer
Crescent wrench
Proper size EZ-OUT

There is two different styles of EZ-out, A left handed spiral flute and a straight flute.

I will be using a spiral flute in this removal.
The spiral flute will screw down and get a firm “bite” on the inside of the broken bolt.
First with the hammer and center punch, knock a good divit as close as possible to the center of the bolt.

This is done so the drill bit will not walk around when you start to drill.

Now with the drill bit in the drill motor.
I am using a 1/8 inch drill bit, the broken bolt is a 8mm (5/16ths)


Drill appox. 1/8th to 1/4th inch down the center of the bolt.
Drill as straight as possible.
Some times it will be necessary to drill all the way through the bolt.

Blow all the metal chips out of the bolt hole.

Now take the EZ-Out and tap in to the hole you just drilled.

Now using the square on the back end of the EZ-out.
Gently apply pressure to the broken bolt, until you feel movement.
If you apply too much pressure, and snap the EZ-Out off in the hole, you will have more serious issues.
 

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I purchased an extraction kit from Matco and it came with count clockwise drill bits. Sometimes I get lucky and the drill bit bites enough to extract the broken bolt or screw.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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BogusSVO said:
If you apply too much pressure, and snap the EZ-Out off in the hole, you will have more serious issues.
you sure will!
Been there and done that before. Definitely sets the mood for the rest of the day.
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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Been there and done that before. Definitely sets the mood for the rest of the day.
honestly, I don't even go for ez outs anymore. I've never had one successfully work, I always end up just giving myself a nice hardened steel core to whatever I'm trying to remove. Now I just drill the bastard bolt out while it's all mild steel
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well it helps to know how the bolt broke. There are times I will not even bother with an EZ out.

If it was rusted and you hit it with a half inch impact and the bolt snaps an ez out will not touch it.
 

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Well it helps to know how the bolt broke. There are times I will not even bother with an EZ out.

If it was rusted and you hit it with a half inch impact and the bolt snaps an ez out will not touch it.
What do you personally do or recommend when that happens?
 

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96 Ranger-stock
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Discussion Starter #9
I have oxy/acetylene torches and welders and die grinders....so broken bolts are not the same for me as most people.

Except busted Subaru turbo mounting bolts.... hate them ... 2 to 3 hours per bolt

Some I will cherry hot the surrounding metal and grab the stub of a broken bolt with vice grips.

Others i weld nuts to and they can be backed out

Then there are the ones I drill out then take a die grinder to
 

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I had a simular issue with my exaust flange and yes flange bolts are the worst
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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Well it helps to know how the bolt broke. There are times I will not even bother with an EZ out.

If it was rusted and you hit it with a half inch impact and the bolt snaps an ez out will not touch it.
this is how I always break bolts :lol:
 

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A method I was taught to use on rusted bolts (works especially good on brake bleeders as well) was the "shock" method. It involves welding a "tit" onto the broken bolt, just something to be able to grab with vice grips. Then you use an oxy acetylene torch to heat it up cherry red. With a cup of water nearby, you dump water on the red hot bolt as soon as you take the heat off. Sometimes it will take a few times, but the idea is that the rapid temp change breaks up the layer of rust in between the threads of the bolt and whatever it's in. Not really applicable for stuff in heads and such, but useful for many other instances. Many times you have to have a feel for it, and work the bolt back and forth. Too much pressure breaks off the tit and you start over. You'll notice you can loosen it a little bit more each time.
 

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I have had good luck with easy-outs and exhaust studs. Probably because they tend to fail because of tension (pulled apart) rather than torsional sheer (twisted off). Also, the constant heating and cooling of the parts,keeps any rust moving around and never gets a chance to set up.

Other than that I consider easy-outs a tool of last resort.
 
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