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This one's for you, Duck.
Joined
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2,304 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so you're tired of having your car take corners like a astrovan. What is there to do? Sway Bars! Sway bars help keep the car level during turns and thus improves handling. The more evenly the car's weight is distributed, the more neutral it will handle under extreme conditions. Most cars come with front sway bars, so all that is needed in most cases is a rear bar to even things out. Adding a beefed up front bar can cause problems if you don't know how to set it up/adjust it properly, so do a little research there before you go doing something brash.

Tools needed:

Ratchet and sockets (your kit will have the sizes you need in the instructions)
Open-end wrench (i'll explain this later)
Jacks
Jack stands
Drill and bits (depending on application)
Iced Tea, because damn it's hot.

Step 1:

Jack up the rear of the car. You can do this either by using the rear jack point, or using the rear axle. If your jack doesn't go high enough to put stands under the rear jack points, you can use your car's spare tire jack to help out like so:

Jack up one side of the car using jack #1, then jack up the axle (on the same side) with jack #2 and place a stand under it. Now lower jack #1 and use it to raise the other side of the car. Raise the axle again with jack #2 and put a stand on that side of the axle. So now your car is jacked up using hte rear axle as the jack point. Now on to the fun bits.....

Step 2:

Assemble your hardware. Examine the diagrams and see how everything fits together. Be sure you get the order right, and have the bushings going hte right way. Get everything finger tight with the locking nuts and double check your work.



Step 3:

Find where your LCA assembly will mount to the frame. In my case it was just a matter of dropping the U-Bolts through existing holes in the frame. Others may have to drill holes, so refer to your intructions for this in need be.



How's dat gonna fit.....



Oh..... :roll:

Now put on the support bolt paying careful attention to what order everything goes back on ;)



Once you've done that for each side proceed to......
 

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This one's for you, Duck.
Joined
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2,304 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Step 4:

With your frame mounting points taken care of, weasel the bar into place. I used the spare tire jack to move the axle up and down to make it easier while working. This will help give you more clearance while working.



You may have to do some modifcation depending on your application, so be prepared for some extra work to make everything fit. :idea: Once the bar is on the bolt, go ahead and put on the rest of the bushings and accompanying hardware to hold it in place while you work on the axle shackles.



Step 5:

With the bar in place, figure out where it mounts to the axle. Make a mark and get your remaining hardware in order. Now you may need to move the stands to the rear body jack points, so here's what to do (if you're stuck with the short jack, if you have a high-lift jack, skip this):

With your spare jack on the axle, raise it up until both jacks are free. Now keep going up until both jack can fit under the rear jacking points. Lower the jack until the car is resting on the stands. Now use the spare jack to raise and lower the axle as needed.





Do the same for both sides and.....

Step 6:

Tighten everything down. Start with the frame support bolts. For the center bar mounting bolt you'll need your open-end wrench to get everything started since the locking nuts will make it spin for all eternity unless something else is gripping them. When tightening down that center bolt, don't crank down on it. Tighten it enough so that the bushings just start to flex a little, then stop. Your instructions may say different, so heed them if they say different. :idea:
 

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This one's for you, Duck.
Joined
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2,304 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not done yet Dammit!

Step 8:

With everything tightened up, slowly lower the car making sure that nothing will get in the way during suspension travel. An easy way to do this is to fully raise the axle, and then lower it, seeing if it binds up anywhere. If it does, find out where it does, and see what need to be done to make it move freely. It may involve a little grinding, or just some coersion with your favorite hammer. If all is well, lower that car and go for a spin!



Oh, and be sure everyhting's square before and after you tighten it down...... Good thing i caught that because my buddy sure as hell didn't :lol:


And now you're done! Enjoy your more stable car in all it's stable glory....or something.

-Foo
 

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This one's for you, Duck.
Joined
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2,304 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Two Week Checkup:

Well, after a few weeks on driving, I looked back underneath to find that hte spacers for the axle shackles had shifted slightly. Out of curiosity, I read back through the destructions and found that they were worded kinda weird and that I didn't tighten them enough. A little "coersion" with my favortie hammer and the spacers were back in place, then went at them with my super-long ratched and really cranked them down this time. That appeared to make a big difference because as soon as I took the first turn out of my neighborhood, I noticed the dynamics of the car changed.....a lot.

SO, be sure to double check your work periodically for stuff like this.

Foo out.
 
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