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EK1
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Disclaimer: The following is provided as a GUIDE ONLY, and neither myself nor D-eries.org take any responsibility for the outcomes of someone else doing the following. You follow these steps at your own risk!


This was done on a 2001 EU3 Civic equipped with a D17 motor. Most D/B/K/H Motors will be the same if not very similar.


Aim: To change or bleed your clutch fluid
Required:
8MM Spanner (Ring or open end is fine)
1/4" Clear Tubing
Bottle/tray to lead the tubing to from the slave cylinder to drain into
OEM Honda Brake Fluid (DOT3/4 Can be used for most/all Honda clutches)




Steps:

1. Pop up your bonnet and locate the clutch slave cylinder bleed valve



It's usually on the front of the gearbox facing the front of the car.



If yours has a rubber cap/boot over it, you would obviously need to remove it to expose the nipple.

2. Get your spanner and loosen the valve, you don't want to remove the whole thing, just a 90/180 degree turn is enough, if not, you can open it a tad more.




3. Get your tubing and insert it over the bleeder nipple and make sure the other end is in your bottle/tray (I didn't have clear tubing so I used a different type instead):






4. Now get someone to jump in the car and push the clutch pedal. You will notice when they press it that the clutch won't come back up, so they will have to pull it back up and press it again.

Repeat this until the fluid in your clutch reservoir drops down to the 'LOW' scale.

Make sure that you don't pass this because you don't want to dry out the system.

At this point you will notice that your bottle/tray will have collected the fluid you just bled.

5. You now want to tighten the bleed valve and open your clutch reservoir and pour in some fresh OEM Honda Brake Fluid into the clutch reservoir until it goes up to "HIGH".


6. Now you want to repeat the process again to make sure you get rid of all of the old gunky clutch fluid from your system.





Important!! - When bleeding the fluid, make sure that the clutch fluid reservoir is closed, you don't want any air pockets going into your system.








Other comments

Takes about 10-15 minutes to do depending on how many times you 'cycle' the fresh oil. It took me close to 30 minutes because I was doing it by myself and I cycled the fresh fluid through it probably about 6-7 times to make sure the old fluid was completely gone.





Clutch engagement after doing this is definitely more 'bitey' than before and the clutch pedal (in my case) got a tad harder, rather than before where it was a little bit spongy I'm guessing due to air pockets in the lines.
 

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EK1
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Discussion Starter #2
Here is the difference between the fresh OEM oil and the old oil that has been in there for God knows how long..


 

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i did mine right after i bought the car...i don't think that it had ever been done. it was BLACK i had it in a gatorade bottle...i couldn't see through it when holding the bottle up to a open light
 
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