Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How's it going guys? New to the board and relatively new to these Civic... Been working on cars since I could first pick up tools, built several muscle cars, but it's my first time doing anything other than maintenance on one of these cars, and this one happens to be my daily.

My car is a stock '95 CX, but I'm planning the D16Z6 swap for later on down the road. Got 178k on this motor and it still runs perfectly. I attribute that to the regular maintenance with quality components and lubricants.

ANYHOW... LOL... Once I do pull the trigger on the Z6 swap, how much can I do to it before needing a tune? Was considering a head shave and Y8 HG's to get the CR up to about 10:1, as well as the 63441Z cam from Crower, along with the existing DC Tri-Y header & CAI, and Buddy Club Sport Pro Spec exhaust. Would this get me to the point of needing / justifying a tune?

This car will remain my daily, so I'm just looking for a little more power, but don't really want to get to the point of custom tunes and such.

Thanks for any input. Oh, and yes I tried searching this info but got tired of not finding anything specific.

- Turbo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
So....you wish to up your CR but are asking if you need a tune. Do you already run 92? If you stay pump gas and don't boost then not really. But to keep from running rich? Average tune on the chrome or hondata.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
Experience. My CRX 10:5.1 for my CR. No problem going to Arco. Got a laptop? Good. Learn chrome. Pass it on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
No offense but did you read my post? My car currently has the stock D15B8 motor that comes in the CX, so why would I run 92 octane?

I guess what I'm trying to figure out is just how much learning these older ECU's can actually do before needing a tune, especially considering this car will remain naturally aspirated. Just trying to plan ahead is all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
They don't learn anything, and you don't "learn" ignition timing anyway, so get that mythology out of your head for any ecu. The most you get is a fuel trim based on O2/Lambda sensor input, but that is not a tuned map in any way.

Yes, for what you are proposing, you will need to tune. Skip CROME, buy an s300 and a proper lambda sensor setup. Learning to tune a mild NA setup is ideal since there is not a lot you can do to blow the thing up while learning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
They don't learn anything, and you don't "learn" ignition timing anyway, so get that mythology out of your head for any ecu. The most you get is a fuel trim based on O2/Lambda sensor input, but that is not a tuned map in any way.

Yes, for what you are proposing, you will need to tune. Skip CROME, buy an s300 and a proper lambda sensor setup. Learning to tune a mild NA setup is ideal since there is not a lot you can do to blow the thing up while learning.
BTW, it's already fuel injected with the 4 wire O2, so what do you mean by "proper lambda sensor setup"?
 

·
BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
Joined
·
3,955 Posts
BTW, it's already fuel injected with the 4 wire O2, so what do you mean by "proper lambda sensor setup"?
not stock.....if youre going to tune timing and ignition tables and fuel youre gonna need a proper o2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Lambda Sensor = Wideband Sensor. Does not equal a 4 wire oxygen sensor. You cannot tune with the latter.

As far as controllers I personally prefer PLX Devices' products. There are others that are okay too, and probably some that are great that I haven't used, but I'll never hesitate to recommend PLX. It also has a simulated narrowband output that actually works well, which will be valuable down the road if you decide to run in closed loop after you are done with your tune.

Get something that uses the LSU4.9 sensor, they are fast, almost indestructible, do not require calibration, and are readily available. The LSU4.2 sensor is a little older and works fine but has some shortcomings that the newer one doesn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Lambda Sensor = Wideband Sensor. Does not equal a 4 wire oxygen sensor. You cannot tune with the latter.

As far as controllers I personally prefer PLX Devices' products. There are others that are okay too, and probably some that are great that I haven't used, but I'll never hesitate to recommend PLX. It also has a simulated narrowband output that actually works well, which will be valuable down the road if you decide to run in closed loop after you are done with your tune.

Get something that uses the LSU4.9 sensor, they are fast, almost indestructible, do not require calibration, and are readily available. The LSU4.2 sensor is a little older and works fine but has some shortcomings that the newer one doesn't.
Now I have to ask; With the cost of all of these various components adding up, would doing the tune myself be more cost effective than having it professionally dyno tuned?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
Lol. You don't know anything. Do what I said. That simple. Btw. The build you proposed is the subject. Run 92. The tune is to obviously not run rich or lean. An aftermarket O2 sensor is ideal. But only after changing your fuel injectors input/output. But what I told you was wrong because lambda? Skip chrome?
Pffft. In the end giving forceful advice doesn't make the car run. I declare shenanigans on this post.

Besides that you're building a Z6. ANY of those threads have what you needed. Saying they don't. Not a single car build in here that didn't/doesnt. Especially a single cam vtec.

Lambda Sensor = Wideband Sensor. Does not equal a 4 wire oxygen sensor. You cannot tune with the latter.

As far as controllers I personally prefer PLX Devices' products. There are others that are okay too, and probably some that are great that I haven't used, but I'll never hesitate to recommend PLX. It also has a simulated narrowband output that actually works well, which will be valuable down the road if you decide to run in closed loop after you are done with your tune.

Get something that uses the LSU4.9 sensor, they are fast, almost indestructible, do not require calibration, and are readily available. The LSU4.2 sensor is a little older and works fine but has some shortcomings that the newer one doesn't.
Now I have to ask; With the cost of all of these various components adding up, would doing the tune myself be more cost effective than having it professionally dyno tuned?
Do both. Whp is the dyno tune process.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top