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Can anyone pls help me how to setup transmission oil cooler for manual tranny where and how did you setup the lines, or better yet post some pics cheers!
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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you gonna install a pump to push the fluid around?
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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First, why do you need one?

500+ transmission builds and only ONE needed a cooler setup. It wasn't a D or B box.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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As transzex said, what purpose do you have that you need one? How do you know the transmission fluid is getting too hot? Do you have a temp sensor plumbed into the transmission somewhere?

I've thought about this before, it really would be a royal pain the ass to plumb in and make work for probably little benefit.

You would have to run a line to the fluid drain hole of your trans, then run this line to a pump capable of pumping the trans fluid, keeping the pump lower than the drain hole to avoid pump cavitation, possibly some kind of filter screen to prevent ruining the pump with any large metallic particles, then run the outlet of the pump to a cooler, then plumb the cooler outlet to another line that adapts to the fill port fitting on your transmission.

For all the added complexity and weight associated, it's not worth it. You'd be better off TIG'ing some aluminum fins to the trans case that get exposed to the airflow under the car.
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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You'd be filling the wrong hole, REVERSE your thinking a bit :)

Pump doesn't need to be mounted lower than drain hole.

Also how Spoon did it on their H22 for the same reasons.
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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?

Wouldn't you want fluid coming from the cooler to pump back into the fill port?
Nope. Ring gear doesn't need the cooling, the individual gears do. Also note the drain plug and reverse switch have same threads. Fill plug is too close to the axle anyways.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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so it would be easier to drill and tap a drain in the bottom, and drill and tap a spot above the gear stacks and pump clean fluid directly onto the gears? even if its a small recirc pump
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Nope. Ring gear doesn't need the cooling, the individual gears do. Also note the drain plug and reverse switch have same threads. Fill plug is too close to the axle anyways.
Ah, yes I could see this being the best solution to direct lube the gearsets with cool fluid, but what if the normal splash lube sump style system that the tranny relies on was fine, but your goal overall was to simply cool the tranny sump oil volume, and not to direct feed the gearsets, I don't see why the drain and fill ports wouldn't work for overall cooling?

Yes you would be directing the fill back towards the ring gear, but you would also be refilling the sump for the rest of the gearbox to use with cool fluid?

I'm not trying to be stubborn at all, but I'm just curious why a sump drain, cool and fill loop couldn't work as an overall way to cool the main gearbox sump lube?

You've been inside hundreds of these transmissions, so I'm definitely not trying to state anything, I'm just curious is all!
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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so it would be easier to drill and tap a drain in the bottom, and drill and tap a spot above the gear stacks and pump clean fluid directly onto the gears? even if its a small recirc pump
Why all that work? The ports are already there.
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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Ah, yes I could see this being the best solution to direct lube the gearsets with cool fluid, but what if the normal splash lube sump style system that the tranny relies on was fine, but your goal overall was to simply cool the tranny sump oil volume, and not to direct feed the gearsets, I don't see why the drain and fill ports wouldn't work for overall cooling?

Yes you would be directing the fill back towards the ring gear, but you would also be refilling the sump for the rest of the gearbox to use with cool fluid?

I'm not trying to be stubborn at all, but I'm just curious why a sump drain, cool and fill loop couldn't work as an overall way to cool the main gearbox sump lube?

You've been inside hundreds of these transmissions, so I'm definitely not trying to state anything, I'm just curious is all!
Just the extra volume of oil helps as well. H series trans are the only ones that had issues. About 20-25 minutes into a SCCA race the would get balky and not shift. Not a big problem in a 30 minute race, but in a 40-45 minute National Championship, it cost a win.

Honda "fixed" the automatic 5 speed issues in the Accords and Oddy's by routing fluid from the stock trans cooler to the second gear clutch pack.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Just the extra volume of oil helps as well. H series trans are the only ones that had issues. About 20-25 minutes into a SCCA race the would get balky and not shift. Not a big problem in a 30 minute race, but in a 40-45 minute National Championship, it cost a win.

Honda "fixed" the automatic 5 speed issues in the Accords and Oddy's by routing fluid from the stock trans cooler to the second gear clutch pack.
Gotcha, so from your experience direct cooling of the gearsets in certain places served a better purpose than just overall cooling of the sump oil. I can definitely see in intense performance high load situations where direct cooling is preferred to be directed to localized extreme pressure generating components.

And I also agree on the increase of oil volume due to the added plumbing being a plus, additional heatsinking!

Sorry to have dragged this topic, but since I have the ear of a trans expert, I have one more quick question that is still on topic, and would possibly help me in the coming months! In your experience, what trans oil temp for most manual honda transaxles is considered an ideal operating range? Also, do you know roughly what temp range typically does the oil begin to start negatively and noticeably affecting shift quality?

I know I could do a search and probably figure these things out, but I'm curious if you have any insight to this based on your personal experiences?

Thanks for any response!
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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No one that I know of has ever installed a temp gauge in a Honda transaxle. Only one was ever a problem.

The team I was working with had most of the parts already sitting on the shelf, so it was a cheap to them setup.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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No one that I know of has ever installed a temp gauge in a Honda transaxle. Only one was ever a problem.

The team I was working with had most of the parts already sitting on the shelf, so it was a cheap to them setup.
Ah, that's cool. Maybe I'll put a thermocouple or some kind of a 0-5V type temp sensor in mine just for kicks, and wire to ECU as an input for data logging! I will be tracking my car, someday, if I can get it to stop breaking lol.
 

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Ah, that's cool. Maybe I'll put a thermocouple or some kind of a 0-5V type temp sensor in mine just for kicks, and wire to ECU as an input for data logging! I will be tracking my car, someday, if I can get it to stop breaking lol.
It'd be interesting data, but a lot of work to find that everything is probably fine.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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It'd be interesting data, but a lot of work to find that everything is probably fine.
Probably :) Just like with my fuel cooler setup lol... I still haven't throw any thermocouples in there to determine in/out temp difference haha, when things begin to warm up I will follow up with this, I've been wanting to.
 

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'91 CRX DX, D15B (D15Z7), DX L3
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I would think returning the oil into the shaft feed cups would be more ideal. Or even closing off each feed with a return fitting so it becomes a (however slightly) pressurized system. Just don't tow the closed-off version with the front wheels on the ground.
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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I would think returning the oil into the shaft feed cups would be more ideal. Or even closing off each feed with a return fitting so it becomes a (however slightly) pressurized system. Just don't tow the closed-off version with the front wheels on the ground.
Bob, watch some of Gale Banks videos about how different rear end covers effect diff. lubing and cooling. When you get to see how the oil gets "whipped" around, it's not so simple.

The ring gear in Honda transmissions becomes a sling pump to lube the countershaft and mainshaft.
 

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'91 CRX DX, D15B (D15Z7), DX L3
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The ring gear in Honda transmissions becomes a sling pump to lube the countershaft and mainshaft.
I figured it was something along those lines, 'just never took the time to figure out which gears were doing the slinging. The cups I'm talking about are the cast-in bits of the housing that collect the slung oil and gravity feed it into the end of each shaft. Using the fill plug would for sure be easier, but plumbing the cups directly would provide more positive cooling to the shafts. Again, the question is where the (perhaps non-existent) issue is in the transmission. Maybe it's the diff carrier bearings, so plumbing the shafts would be counter-productive.

Also... Someone tell me OP isn't a bot. -_-
 
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