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1997 civic ex
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My buddy gave me a h1c of his d250 after upgrading his turbo. I was wondering if it would be possible to boost this on stock internals? How big injectors would I need?
 

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If it is off the early 90s ram with the cummins, you are going to grow a beard before spooling it enough to hurt anything on the stock engine.

I bet it will run just fine, but its going to be a setup that needs some brake boosting to have a ton of fun.


Now, build an engine with a bit more compression, but more importantly, use a camshaft that gets you some more exhaust flow, and it will actually be a fun setup. It will lug a bit down low, but it will tap on the rev limtier fairly hard.




Plan your fuel system for around 500whp. THat way you have headroom if you get a built engine in there to support it properly.


No matter what, you will want an adjustable FPR of a REAL brand. And a Walbro 190 in the tank.

A factory evo 9 or evo 10 fuel pump from rockauto can be made to work, do some research to see if you are up to the task.

Walbro 190 is a drop in. Get a fuel sock that is larger than factory. Holley has a few that are somewhere around $80-100 that are quite large and prevent fuel starving.
 

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1997 civic ex
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If it is off the early 90s ram with the cummins, you are going to grow a beard before spooling it enough to hurt anything on the stock engine.

I bet it will run just fine, but its going to be a setup that needs some brake boosting to have a ton of fun.


Now, build an engine with a bit more compression, but more importantly, use a camshaft that gets you some more exhaust flow, and it will actually be a fun setup. It will lug a bit down low, but it will tap on the rev limtier fairly hard.




Plan your fuel system for around 500whp. THat way you have headroom if you get a built engine in there to support it properly.


No matter what, you will want an adjustable FPR of a REAL brand. And a Walbro 190 in the tank.

A factory evo 9 or evo 10 fuel pump from rockauto can be made to work, do some research to see if you are up to the task.

Walbro 190 is a drop in. Get a fuel sock that is larger than factory. Holley has a few that are somewhere around $80-100 that are quite large and prevent fuel starving.
Sweet man thanks a lot

If it is off the early 90s ram with the cummins, you are going to grow a beard before spooling it enough to hurt anything on the stock engine.

I bet it will run just fine, but its going to be a setup that needs some brake boosting to have a ton of fun.


Now, build an engine with a bit more compression, but more importantly, use a camshaft that gets you some more exhaust flow, and it will actually be a fun setup. It will lug a bit down low, but it will tap on the rev limtier fairly hard.




Plan your fuel system for around 500whp. THat way you have headroom if you get a built engine in there to support it properly.


No matter what, you will want an adjustable FPR of a REAL brand. And a Walbro 190 in the tank.

A factory evo 9 or evo 10 fuel pump from rockauto can be made to work, do some research to see if you are up to the task.

Walbro 190 is a drop in. Get a fuel sock that is larger than factory. Holley has a few that are somewhere around $80-100 that are quite large and prevent fuel starving.
Do you think 11:1 would be enough?
 

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stock internals will not be happy with 300hp. A very conservative tuner, GOOD driving habits, letting the engine warm up, etc.. is what will survive 300hp.

If you are going to spend the time, effort, and money getting it tuned and supporting the new airflow, you might as well spend the extra $700-1000 to build the motor, or grab a junkyard spare, and at the very least, open the ring gaps and chuck in some cheap maxspeeding rods.
 

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93 Civic HB SI, 95 Civic HB CX
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I was gonna go stock internals and hope for 300 to the clutch. But im going to do a vitara build on a z6 block. Do you think a cam would be necessary?
What is your budget?

Stock internals wont live at 300.

Cam would help, but if you are using a turbo that large, turn her up to 20+psi and she'll hit 300whp on stock cam.

Dont forget all the necessary supporting mods. It will add up quick. The pistons are likely going to be one of the cheapest component of the build if going vitara.
 

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1997 civic ex
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What is your budget?

Stock internals wont live at 300.

Cam would help, but if you are using a turbo that large, turn her up to 20+psi and she'll hit 300whp on stock cam.

Dont forget all the necessary supporting mods. It will add up quick. The pistons are likely going to be one of the cheapest component of the build if going vitara.
I don’t really have a set budget but I don’t have k swap kind of money. I have a y8 block and head and I was going to use it to save some money but every forum I read says just go z6. Is it even worth building the y8? Also would I have to build the head at all?
 

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People complain the d16y7 and d16y8 engines are junk, due to the lesser oiling system. It is perfectly fine if you keep up on oil maintenance, and do proper treatment, such as warming the engine up prior to beating on it. Porting an OEM oil pump to allow more flow helps reduce any chances of spinning a bearing.

If you cannot come up with an actual budget, then I highly suggest getting a notebook and pen out, and starting to categorize and organize steps for the build.


A bare bones minimal engine build is only $1000, and it makes the engine support over 400+hp within reason, especially if you do not intend to rev it beyond 7500 rpm.

Fuel system will need minimum of $500 if everything is new. Filter, pump, lines, regulator, injectors, fittings. The stock fuel system will not properly support even 200whp. The stock regulator is not good for boost, as it is easy for the boost to blow a hole through an old diaphragm in the stock regulator.

An ebay sourced intercooler, piping, couplers, and some exhaust pieces will run right around $600-900 for a decent setup. You will need to piece it together. The exhaust side is most expensive, since you will need a manifold with the correct turbo flange, or you grab a typical T3 flange manifold, and build an adapter if needed.



Basically, if you intend to spend under $2500, you will really need to hunt around for those hard-to-find good deals.


Junkayrds used to offer a haven for cheap turbo builds. Heck, a single 1st gen mitsu eclipse allowed snatching a fuel regulator, fuel pump, fuel injectors, piping, small intercooler, and random intake piping, ready to be hacked up and re-used.
 

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I don’t really have a set budget but I don’t have k swap kind of money. I have a y8 block and head and I was going to use it to save some money but every forum I read says just go z6. Is it even worth building the y8? Also would I have to build the head at all?
The Z6 definitely has advantages for sure in the oiling department, but you can use a Z6 crank in a Y8 and modify the oil pump to achieve many of the advantages that come baked in to the Z6.

If sticking with the Y8 crank in the Y8 block, at 300whp you really need to make sure the oiling system is ready to help so the crank will last a while. A new OEM pump should be mandatory, and if budget allows, getting 4piston or Bad Guys to port it, using brand new tri layer bearings, measuring your main and rod oil clearances so you know what oil weight to run, a very good quality oil filter, etc.
 

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Horsepower isnt what kills d16y engines' oil setup. Oil temps do. ANd having the oil overfilled kills all the D series engines. D16z6 has more durability due to the extra oiling. But it isnt a magic fix.


My best advise regarding both, find a d15z1 oil filter housing/warmer coil, grab the center bolt as well, and enjoy engine oil that warms with coolant temp, and reduces peak operating temps overall.


THen go ahead and keep your oil at the minimum ADD line on the dipstick. This significantly reduces aeration at high rpms. Aeration causes oil pressure DROP. Keeping your oil at a lower level ALSO means you NEED to make sure the cylinder head has zero issues with pooling oil in the cam baths. Some of these engines had casting flash inside the head partially blocking oil returns. They generally pose ZERO issues on a stock engine driven daily and kept stock. But under far more engine stresses, this can be exposed.

Find your favorite diesel 15w40 engine oil, and run that religiously. Change every 2500 miles or 3 months if you want the oil system to stay as clean as possible.


I am a firm believer in taking the head apart and cleaning it up, cleaning up ports of casting issues at a bare minimum, and putting new seals everywhere. New valve guides and valve spring seats go a long way to get everything equalized, minimal oil usage, and a chance to see if the engine has been struggling to clear out crankcase pressure.
 
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