Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
ECU codes, code , explanation « » 9:03 PM 3/13/2006 Reply Edit

For faq
White smoke out the exhaust, does not always mean a blown head gasket. Which some fools are to stupied as not to beleive it. However trying to convience them differently, is like telling somebody that something is hot and will burn them, yet they will still try to feel/pick-up it. It can be caused by the engine running a little to rich or from a bad sensor. One example is when running N2O, and the extra fuel that is added when it's been activated. N2O is odderless and coloress so it cannot be causing it. This is also a visual clue when someone is using it. When I had my supercharger installed, I was told that I should be seeing a little white smoke too when in boost. I also saw an HF with a bad dist., it had white smoke pouring out of the exhaust, until it was replaced. When adjusting the fuel pressure on mine, it to will have white smoke out the exhaust at idle, if it's set a little too high.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 1 - O2 Sensor - Code 2 is for the one down on the cat. Which was not used in the US.
MAP, TDC & CYL (along others) helps determine the Pulse Width (PW) in which fuel is injected. With the MAP having the most control, out of all other sensors.

Testing requires a voltmeter.
The voltage on a properly working sensor should sweep between .1 to .9 volts 2-3 times a second @ 2500 rpm. Peeps with A/F Ratio meters, will see the reading moving/dancing around all the time. This means everything is working all right

Unheated O2 sensor have to heat up, and maintain 600+ degrees F in order to work properly. Until that temp is reached, the ECU sends out .45V, until it reaches operating temp. When temp is reached, the O2 sensor will send out .5V. Telling the ECU it's up to operating temp, and can now go into "Closed Loop" operation. That is, if all the "other" conditions are met too, like water temp, etc....

Voltages:

Lean - .1 volts
stoich - .5 volts
Rich - .9 volts
O2 sensors do not wear out... they fail due to contamination.


Silcon Depostits (from using gasket sealents that are not O2 safe)
Solvents, Lubricants, Cleaners, Adhesives
Gasoline Additives
Lead
Carbon Deposits (rich condition)
Engine Oil (burning or spilling)
Anti-Freeze (blown head gasket)
Clogged External Air Vents (dirt, ect...)
Running Lean (too much heat)
ECU damage can occure using the wrong sensor, due to the execessive current draw requirements of non-stock sensor.


Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 3 - MAP Sensor
Usually means there is something wrong with the sensor itself.
Has the the most control over the fuel injector pulse width.
When the MAP voltage is too high check code 5.


incorrect cam timming
incorrect iginition timming
restricted exhaust
excessively worn engine or leacking valves
Testing - Voltage varies from about .6v to 2.7v. Running no load will usually be less then 1v or slightly lower, when warm and idling. Under heavy load 2.5 to 2.75 volts. PA sensor should also read close to the same with Engine Off and Key On (EOKO).


Condidtion MAP Volts Inj PW Exhaust CO
Normal .94 2.0 ms .3%
Vacuum Leak Created on MAP Hose 1.13 2.3 ms 6.5%
Bigger Vacuum Leak Created on MAP Hose 1.25 2.7 ms 9.9%

MAP Sensor Wires:


1 White/Red
1 Green/White
1 White

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 4 - Crank Angle Sensor

Top sensor in the dist. and is used for fuel control and misfire detection.

If the dist. base bearing starts failing, it will start heating the sensor(s) up, destroying the magnetism causing a code(s). It will lose 10% of it's strenght, each time it is heated up, to a 170 degrees plus.

In most cases, replacing the distributor is the only alternative. Especially if the bearing has failed.
Honda does don't stock the bearing itself, but other after-market compaines are said to have one.

If you have problems starting the engine, or drivability after the install check your cam aligment. The seizing bearing might have caused it to jump a tooth/notch or two. From the extra drag due to the bearing failing.

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 5 - MAP Sensor

Usually means there is something wrong with the hose.

When the MAP voltage is too high (indicating vacuum is lower then normal) the problem is rarely a faulty sensor, but in fact a problem with the engine itself

incorrect cam timming
incorrect iginition timming
restricted exhaust
excessively worn engine or leacking valves

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 6 - Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT)
Helps determine the Pulse Width of the injectors at start-up. When this sensor starts acting-up, the engine will get hard to start, on "warm/hot starts". The wax pellet inside the sensor has gotton lazy. Sending bogus signals to the ECU, causing it to flood the engine.

When cold, it should read 2.5-4.5 volts. Also, check the IAT sensor for the same voltage, they should read close to the same. When full warmed should read .5-.6 volts. You can use a resistor with a 330 ohm 1/2 watt spec, or one from Radio Shack part# 271-1113. Start the engine and let it warm up, then kill the engine. Put the resistor in the wire connector on the harness. Start the engine, if problem goes away then replace the sensor. Use this only for temporay testing, it will cause other performance issues. Meaning the ECU will think the engine is always warmed up, when it's not.

This sensor is also known to cause hot and cold starting problems.

Temp F Volts
0 4.70
10 4.50
20 4.29
30 4.10
40 3.86
50 3.61
60 3.35
70 3.08
80 2.81
90 2.50
100 2.26

When the engine is hot, the sensor is telling the ECU that the engine is cold. Flooding occurs, due too a improper injector pulse width. Unplug the sensor if you need to start the car in a hurry. The ECU will throw a code and go into limp mode, however you will be able to drive it.

Back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Code 7 - Throttle Position/Angle Sensor

TPS sensor input is used to determine when the throttle is:

Idle
Wide Open Throttle (WOT)
Rapid Movement
During these conditions the ECU makes changes to the injector Pulse Width (PW).
The PW is widen slightly when the throttle initially goes to idle. Within a few seconds the O2 sensor will correct the mixture.

Closed Throttle Input (under .5V), engine RPM is above 1100, engine is warm. The fuel injectors will be shut-off (used to conserve fuel). Peeps with A/F Ratio Meters will see this happen, when the gauge drops to full lean, or no reading at all.

When Wide Open Throttle is detected the PW is increased above normal fuel delivery. This is also known as "Open Loop" operation, when the ECU ignores the output from the O2 sensor.

With Rapid Throttle Opening the ECU is watching the TPS input voltage for rapid changes. A sudden rise in the voltage would mean the throttle was opened quickly. So the ECU would increase the PW momentarily. As soon as the MAP sensor senses the drop in vacuum, it will take over.

Testing - With the Key On, Engine Off hook up a voltmeter to the TPS. @ idle (closed throttle), voltage should be close to .5V and @ WOT (Wide Open Throttle) voltage should be 4.5V.

The best way to adjust the TPS voltage is @ idle (closed throttle). While Key On, Engine Off, hook up voltmeter between the yel/wht & grn/wht and observe reading. If it needs to be adjusted, loosen the TPS mounting and move the TPS until voltmeter reads close to .5V. The check engine light will let you know immediately whether you missed up or not.

TPS Sensor Wires:


1 Red/Blue
1 Green/White
1 Yellow/White

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 8 - Top Dead Center Sensor

It's the second sensor in the dist. It can also be located on the camshaft of DOHC engines. It determines the injection timming for each cylinder, also used to detect engine speed (rpm) to read the basic discharge duration, for different operating conditions.

If the dist. base bearing starts failing, it will heat the sensor(s) up, destroying the magnetism thus causing a code(s). It will lose 10% of it's strenght, each time it is heated up, to a 170 degrees plus.

In most cases, replacing the distributor is the only alternative. Especially if the bearing has failed.
Honda does don't stock the bearing, but other after-market compaines are said to have one.

If you have problems starting the engine, or drivability after the install check your cam aligment. The seizing bearing might have caused it to jump a tooth/notch or two. From the extra drag due to the bearing failing.

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 9 - No. 1 Cylinder Position Sensor

It's the third sensor in the dist., and it detects the position of the No. 1 Cylinder, as the base for the Sequential Injection. It can also be located on the camshaft of DOHC engines.

CYP sensor is mounted on the exhaust cam on the ZC.

If the dist. base bearing starts failing, it will heat the sensor(s) up, destroying the magnetism thus causing a code(s). It will lose 10% of it's strenght, each time it is heated up to 170 degrees plus.

In most cases, replacing the distributor is the only alternative. Especially if the bearing has failed.
Honda does don't stock the bearing by itself, but other after-market compaines are said to have one.

If you have problems starting the engine, or drivability after the install check your cam aligment. The seizing bearing might have caused it to jump a tooth/notch or two. From the extra drag due to the bearing failing.

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 10 - Intake Air Temperature Sensor

When cold, it should read 2.5-4.5 volts. Also, check the ECT sensor for the same voltage, they should read close to the same. Use the above chart for the ECT for checking voltage, since the two sensor should read close to the same.

IAT Sensor Wires:


1 Red/Yellow
1 Green/White

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Code 12 - Exhaust Gas Recirculation System

Mounted on the right back corner of the fire wall. It cannot be purchased seperatly, but only as a unit. Voltage range of the lift sensor is 1.2v closed to 4.0v open. It was required on all cars sold in in CA. starting in 1988. However, some CIVIC's were engineered without having to use one, to control NOx.

Purge Control Wires:


1 Yellow/Black
1 Red/Yellow

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Code 13 - Atmosphric Pressure Sensor

The PA sensor should read close to the MAP sensor of 2.75v, this may very small amounts due to current weather conditions and elevation. Due to it's location, it is probably easier to check the voltage at the ECU. This sensor vary seldom, or never at all should fail. Flooding may have damaged it, at one time or another.

Back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Code 14 - Electronic Air Control Valve
Lets extra air into the intake manifold, to help control the idle under different loads.

Check the O-rings, for mountng condition.
Clean the inside of the Valve after removing, using any kind of solvent that will remove carbon build up. By spraying it inside the two holes ect...

Place the flat end of a screw driver on the EACV while the engine is running. Place the handle against your ear and listen. Should hear something in there jumping back and fourth at a rapid rate.

EACV Sensor Wires:


1 Blue/Black
1 Yellow/Black

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Code 15 - Ignition Output Signal

Something is wrong with the referance voltage, the ECU is receiving from the igniter.
The only way to check this, is with a Volt Meter of some kind, or ocs-scope. The latter being the most accurate. Sooo, that means a trip to a shop, that has this kind of equip...

Most peeps just end-up replacing the dist.. However, you can DYI if you have the tools and manual...

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Code 16 - Fuel Injector

Code 16 is probably the Main Relay, however it could still mean a bad Injector, Resistor Box tho.
Most failures occur, when the weather starts heating-up for the summer...


If the car refuses to start, but "turns over" on a hot day, try opening the doors/windows, and let the interior cool down. "Then try starting again". May not work all the time, but worth a try anyway. Also, would help in troubleshooting the prob, if it does start. Another place to look is the ECT sensor, refer to the above


Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Code 17 - Vehicle Speed Sensor

Sorry, still working on it....

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Code 19 - Lock Up Control Solenoid (auto trans only)

Sorry, still working on it....

Back


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Code 20 - Electric Load Detector

First make sure you have a good battery....


Open the Main Fuse box lid (Right side shock tower).
Disconnect the 3 point connector, from the ELD unit. (Follow the harraness that runs through the box).
With the ignition switch ON, there should be battery voltage between the BLK/YEL(+) and BLK(-) terminals.

If there is no voltage, check for:

Blown No. 14 (10A) fuse in the dash fuse box.
An open in the BLK/YEL(+) wire between the dash fuse box and the main fuse box.
Pour ground (G201)
If there is voltage then goto the next step.....

Check for voltage between the GRN/RED terminal and body ground with the ignition switch ON. There should
be approximately 5V.

If the voltage(5V) is not specified, check the alternator control system.
If the voltage is as specified then goto next step.....

Connect the 3 - Point Connector to the ELD unit.

Check for volatage between the GRN/RED terminal and body ground, with the ignition switch ON and turn on the
headlight low beam's.

There should be approximately 2V.

If the voltage(2V) is not specified, replace the main fuse box (ELD unit is not available separately)
If the voltage is as specified above, ELD unit is OK.

Back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,015 Posts
wow!!! STICKY is madatory what a detailed writeup with everything even how to fix it!
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,226 Posts
needs some corrections, esp. on the temps since they are in Celcius.

And before the original poster comes on here and grips, list where you got the info from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
needs some corrections, esp. on the temps since they are in Celcius.

And before the original poster comes on here and grips, list where you got the info from.
It was from another message board awhile back. I posted it back in the day, years ago on another site. Figured it would help here.
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,226 Posts
I just sstated to list your source because someone got bent out of shape when I posted some 4wd tranny images. He stated they were his property to which I cried foul since he ripped them off from Honda :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I just sstated to list your source because someone got bent out of shape when I posted some 4wd tranny images. He stated they were his property to which I cried foul since he ripped them off from Honda :)
Hey no biggy, just trying to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
great info.. mine is showing code 8 could i just put in the new tdc sensor inside of my existing dizzy the module costs about 70 at pep boys or should i just buy a new dizzy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
the only way to get rid of code 19 is to get a 5 speed ecu, code 19 occurs when doing auto to manual swap and still using the factory auto ecu
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top