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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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nope, lol, was hoping you were the diy guy to be the leader lol.

remove, drill and tap, then plug it? hahaha
 

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89 EF 4wd sedan
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
nope, lol, was hoping you were the diy guy to be the leader lol.

remove, drill and tap, then plug it? hahaha
I did think about tapping and plugging it, but i'm not really sure what its purpose is. I thought maybe it served as some kind of fail safe, maybe if the line pressure is too high it allows brake fluid to bleed off so fluid doesn't bypass elsewhere (like the internal seals in the master?) I'm not really sure.

Maybe i'll dig a little deeper. Bloody hell.
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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So naturally, i opened it. I can't see any reason why the seal can't just be replaced. So i put a fresh EPDM seal in there (brake fluid compatible), sand blasted/repainted the mounting bracket that was ruined and put it back together:
 

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89 EF 4wd sedan
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Discussion Starter · #64 · (Edited)
Well, thanks for opening a can of worms @slo_eg8.

I had a look online but i couldn't find anyone who knew what they were talking about. So I completely dismantled the valve to find out how it worked and what the story was with that rubber bung. So for those who are interested....



The two visible security torx screws hold together two identical mirrored castings, one (the lower one) has a machined hole with that rubber bung plugging it. The area behind the rubber bung, and between the two castings is actually a dry area (no brake fluid should be present). further inside the casting is a machined bore with a plunger housing (black piece, bottom of the picture) pressed inside. This has an external seals that mate with the machined bore to prevent brake fluid from passing it, this doesn't move. The plunger (silver thing pictured in the centre) which sits inside this plunger housing has a metered spring which is unique to the cast side depending on the proportion rate. In this case it's 30:30, so both sides are the same. But for a 40:30 valve for instance, these springs have a unique compression rate. So when you jump on the brakes, the springs in both housings compress at different rates and bypass a metered amount of fluid from the port indicated either Front or Rear to the left and right channels. Once the two units are assembled they're also spring balanced against each other, so the more one side of the housing compresses under pressure, the more resistance it passes to the other brake channels to keep it balanced. The internal plunger also has seals to prevent high pressure brake fluid from passing into the void between the two castings.



So, if there's brake fluid coming from either the O ring that i originally replaced, or the rubber bung, this indicates that there is high pressure fluid bypassing the plunger or plunger housing seal and accumulating within the dry space. It might be possible to replace those seals, but i could see some preliminary wear on the machined housing which could prevent new seals from sealing correctly, or wear them quicker.

TL / DR: i threw the prop in the bin and bought a new one. $200 bucks and 2 weeks, zzz.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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this is why youre awesome.
 
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93 Civic HB SI
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I did think about tapping and plugging it, but i'm not really sure what its purpose is. I thought maybe it served as some kind of fail safe, maybe if the line pressure is too high it allows brake fluid to bleed off so fluid doesn't bypass elsewhere (like the internal seals in the master?) I'm not really sure.

Maybe i'll dig a little deeper. Bloody hell.
If someone told me not to open a valve, id open it wondering what they were hiding lol

Depending on the OE, rebuilding proportioning valves is a proper service item.... maybe honda says not to do it for safety reasons? Maybe the corrosive nature of brake fluid on the steel spring and other pieces when it leaks, is reason enough that they dont want it refurbished? All speculation, but its probably this:

  • Honda: "The average ricer has a hard time keeping engines running right. Make notes all over the service manuals to keep their damn hands out of the brake hydraulics!"

Im sure you've done your due diligence and inspection on the valve and innards. If it looks straightforward on disassembly, it probably is. Refreshing the seals probably isnt a bad idea if everything else looks clean :)

Excuse me while i go disassemble my old prop valve out of curiosity...
 

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89 EF 4wd sedan
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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
If someone told me not to open a valve, id open it wondering what they were hiding lol

Depending on the OE, rebuilding proportioning valves is a proper service item.... maybe honda says not to do it for safety reasons? Maybe the corrosive nature of brake fluid on the steel spring and other pieces when it leaks, is reason enough that they dont want it refurbished? All speculation, but its probably this:

  • Honda: "The average ricer has a hard time keeping engines running right. Make notes all over the service manuals to keep their damn hands out of the brake hydraulics!"

Im sure you've done your due diligence and inspection on the valve and innards. If it looks straightforward on disassembly, it probably is. Refreshing the seals probably isnt a bad idea if everything else looks clean :)

Excuse me while i go disassemble my old prop valve out of curiosity...
wtf, i did pull it apart and made a whole post about it but it appears to have been deleted. @slo_eg8 any idea where it's gone? I don't feel like typing it up again.

Was probably the most informative post id ever written lol
 

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wtf, i did pull it apart and made a whole post about it but it appears to have been deleted. @slo_eg8 any idea where it's gone? I don't feel like typing it up again.

Was probably the most informative post id ever written lol
A whole post? Is this not it?

Screenshot_20210611-021327_Chrome.jpg



If it is, then its in this thread, one page back lol.

If you made something else more in depth, ive personally not seen it. Not to sound stalkerish, but when you post stuff, i pay attention lol.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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wtf, i did pull it apart and made a whole post about it but it appears to have been deleted. @slo_eg8 any idea where it's gone? I don't feel like typing it up again.

Was probably the most informative post id ever written lol

woah there champ. I aint do shit lol. I was LITTERALLY about to quote you like "why the fuck did you delete that" lol


tis fixed either way lol
 
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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
woah there champ. I aint do shit lol. I was LITTERALLY about to quote you like "why the fuck did you delete that" lol


tis fixed either way lol
😂 Someone's playing with me

Ripped the bandaid off and got stuck into the fuel tank, the wagon fuel pump hanger assembly that i bought arrived this week so i could mockup and check the positioning of the swirl pot.



The point of no return



The DA swirl pot fit in perfectly, it's probably the same part that's used in EFI EF tanks:



Confirmed the fuel level sender wasn't fouled by it:



Checked the pump sat in there nicely:





I'd tried to cut it so that i could shift the panel over to compensate for the gap left by the cutting disc so at least that way i could but the metal up against each other. There was a couple of gaps, but it was pretty good overall, most of the gaps could be closed with a bit of massaging with a hammer



I chucked the retaining ring on, but when i used plasticine to check the compression of the pump gasket, i noticed the bastard wasn't sealing properly.



closer inspection of the carb opening:



vs EFI tank opening:



Seems obvious now, but the EFI tank lip sits a couple of mm higher which lets it seal. Soo, instead of being able to finish the tank off, i now have to fabricate a new retaining ring which lets the pump sit a little lower. I also think i'm going to dress the welds with a fuel proof sealant incase there are any pinholes. The welds seem ok, but just incase - it'd be a nightmare if it leaks...

ZZzzz.
 

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89 EF 4wd sedan
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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Prop valve came in. The wagon prop was showing as out of stock, but the EG prop runs an identical 30:30 split and as far as i can tell the only difference is the bracket that it's assembled with. So i swapped the bracket over with the one from the wago, so now we should be G2G.



Wish i had the time to install all my bits that're coming in, not waiting on much else!
 
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