Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
93 DX
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yes I could pay a machine shop to do this but it looks somewhat simple.

3 things right?

Rotating weight= big end of rod and big end bearings.
Reciprocating weight=small end of rod, piston and rings and maybe some oil weight.

Bob weight=some portion of the reciprocating weight and all the rotating weight. V8 engine builders usually say 50% of reciprocating and 100% of rotating.

So how does this work on a flat crank like an inline 4? I don't usually hear about weight being added to the crank throws to offset the heavier than stock pistons and rods. When I pay a machine shop to balance my honda engine what are they doing?
 

·
Registered
93 DX
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Nevermind, Google was my friend.

From Laskey racing's website
Do not confuse balancing V-8's as compared to 4 cylinder engines. It is a completely different process. Since two cylinders are directly opposed to the other two cylinders, putting bob weights on the crank does not make any difference in the balancing measurements. The added weights just cancel each other out when spinning the crank. Aftermarket pistons and rods come balanced to within a gram. (That is very close when you consider there is 453.6 grams in a pound.) Clutches and flywheels also come spun balanced from the manufacturer. This is necessary in order to have their SFI certification. Same with aftermarket balancers.
So if you trust Honda's balancing job on the crank just make sure the rods and pistons are all the same. Way more simple than a v engine.
 

·
Registered
del Sol si '94
Joined
·
2,539 Posts
Dont forget, weight towards the center has less effect on balance than weight farther away.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top