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Discussion Starter #61
Just did some more research. The existing port on the valve cover does not vent enough apparently. So I got some fittings to tap the valve cover with.
My new concern comes from the in/out routing in the can. If you route a hose from where the black box was into the “in” fitting on the can, why would the “out” hoses go to the valve cover and not the intake.
I was looking at drtalon’s pictures and that looks like what the set up is. Lower port is the “in” routed to where the black box was. Then the upper two, where all the vapor goes once the oil is has separated to the bottom, are the “out” and are routed to the valve cover. But, like, what. How would the valve cover become a source of a vaccum With the black box set up?
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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You don't want gases going back into the motor. With aftermarket builds, all crankcase gases need to vent to atmosphere, unless you can build a well designed Closed Crankcase Ventilation system like most factory turbo or diesel engines run.

Its rather pointless in your case unless emissions are seriously regulated in your state and an inspector will hassle you. Just vent to atmosphere.

All ports are technically "in" on my setup. On this box, there is no in or out, its simply a breather box. Key term, breather. It allows air in AND out. Your setup will require the same thought. Air has to be able to move in and out freely with no restriction.

The bottom port leads to the hole where the black box on the block used to go. By putting a hose low to the bottom of the can, it also acts as a potential drain back if oil in the can gets too high over time, and will drain through the port in the block.

The two upper ports handle crankcase gasses via the valve cover, although the bottom one can still breathe just as freely.

The catch can I use has only has baffles right before the holes to the filters, keeping as much oil vapor down into the can as possible, while still allowing gases and air to vent freely.

Other than those baffles, it's just an open can. All ports are "in" ports.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
is a turbo going on this?
Potentiably.
You don't want gases going back into the motor. With aftermarket builds, all crankcase gases need to vent to atmosphere, unless you can build a well designed Closed Crankcase Ventilation system like most factory turbo or diesel engines run.

Its rather pointless in your case unless emissions are seriously regulated in your state and an inspector will hassle you. Just vent to atmosphere.

All ports are technically "in" on my setup. On this box, there is no in or out, its simply a breather box. Key term, breather. It allows air in AND out. Your setup will require the same thought. Air has to be able to move in and out freely with no restriction.

The bottom port leads to the hole where the black box on the block used to go. By putting a hose low to the bottom of the can, it also acts as a potential drain back if oil in the can gets too high over time, and will drain through the port in the block.

The two upper ports handle crankcase gasses via the valve cover, although the bottom one can still breathe just as freely.

The catch can I use has only has baffles right before the holes to the filters, keeping as much oil vapor down into the can as possible, while still allowing gases and air to vent freely.

Other than those baffles, it's just an open can. All ports are "in" ports.
Figured. When I look up 3 port oil catch can. A lot of the cheap (I know... pick 2 of the 3) ones say 1 “in” port and two “out” ports, still has the filter at the top though. I wonder if I could buy one of those and just route it with one “in” to where the black box was and the two valve cover fittings to the two “out” fittings. Or maybe I’ll just use the one that came with the kit and fit a filter to the top where the lid is 🤷‍♂️. And I would use whatever that scrunchy ball of stainless steel that I see people use in some videos as my baffling.

I started fabricating a bend for the down pipe that is more extreme than the bend that comes out of the flange. I’m doing it but not great.
4472FF43-030D-42F0-AC52-3AE8F80AF9FE.jpeg
 

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I'd cut the tack and try and get the piece on the right to sit more flush, that gap at the bottom looks like a challenge to bridge.
My motto and welding life experiences: It may not be pretty, it may not be strong, it may waste a ton of time and material, but any gap can be bridged...
 

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If me with my horrible welding skills can take a 20 year old Lincoln MIG setup and bridge a one inch gaping hole in a thick snow plow blade after an hour of work, Im pretty sure he can cover 1/16" gap lol

Metal looks decently thick for the exhaust, so should be resistant to cracking if the metal sees too much heat or too quick of cooling
 
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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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that's pretty much 97% of welding. proper fit up and cleaning lol.
 
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mmmm pie...

what did you cut the slices with ?
after cutting I like to face each piece by holding it on the side of a running chop saw disk.\
close to zero gap so you can do a fushion pass with minimal or no filler.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
I cut the pipe using this bad boy
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This has proven to be very difficult for a person of my intellectual capabilities. But I’m doing it, slowly. Back purge without a proper set up has been a nightmare, probably not as effective as I think, and a major use of argon.
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Lots of cleaning and grinding tungsten. I figure that ugly welds should hold as long as there’s no contamination and good penetration.
 

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Don't feel bad, I'm definitely no better.... ergonomics and practice are the only path to success with TIG. Getting comfortable holding torch and feeding rod are hard to get comfortable with and stay smooth, especially with tubing, but gets much better with practice over time.

I can MIG anything, anytime, anywhere, but when it comes to TIG, a proper work surface that doubles as a heat sink, coupled with numerous ways and room to secure a piece are critical, that and cleaning.

I have none of those things, except 2 pieces of aluminum angle stock and a vice. Its not a good heatsink for doing flanges at all, and I just have zero patience with stainless haha 😆

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I'm much more comfortable with steel and aluminum on TIG:

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All about the practice :) TIG is fun.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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aluminum is cake....but fuck your life if it gets dirty. clean it. get comfy, start welding, stop and clean it, get comfy, weld, stop and clean it, rinse and repeat until youre ready to throw tools. and lawd help you if your filler jumps up your tungsten

talon, you should overlap your puddles more my dude. and the donut holes.......yeeesh
but there was a saying in my class "pretty doesn't always sell"
 

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Since the creativity is showing with the welding, why not build a square brace for the front of the car? See the small dimples near the corner of the headlight supports, closest to the radiator section? Square those off to the upper control arm studs on the strut towers (not the strut mounts themselves)

Makes a big difference once you are putting down power. Does require bracing the bottom of the rad support for best durability (look up front traction bars)
 

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Discussion Starter #76
I swapped the foot control with a hand control toggle switch and it has made this a lot easier.
18D64693-173D-43E8-8FC7-27C0FF6CCEAC.jpeg


I did some measurements and had to reduce the length of section of pipe that connects to the flange. Is having this little clearance ok?
B6B682F2-4C51-4DBD-AEC2-7093FC62494F.jpeg

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My plan is to weld the top portion from the outside, then the lower from the inside. Shielding the backside of the weld for when I’m welding the inside for the lower portion will be difficult but I may be able to do with with aluminum foil.
As for the whole front traction bar thing. I’ll look into it.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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Id cut it off the flange, weld on a flat straight piece almost the thickness of the flange, and weld the entire thing from the inside with a little bit of re enforcements on the outside
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Id cut it off the flange, weld on a flat straight piece almost the thickness of the flange, and weld the entire thing from the inside with a little bit of re enforcements on the outside
Problem with welding on another piece of that thickness is that it may push it out too far to clear the ac compressor. It would have to be a pretty small length of pipe.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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yeah, youre putting on enough for it to sit just below the other side of the flange with enough room to put a weld in.

like this



but that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Did you mill that piece yourself or have a shop do it? It looks like this way requires no purging.
 
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