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Discussion Starter #1
So i called this place to buy my piston rings and the guy told me that my car use a 75mm cylinder bore but i just saw in my repair manual where it said 74.98mm, chech out my picture below. How this going to work now since i bought the rings as 75mm?
 

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you do realize that is only a difference of 0.02mm right? Your fingernail is thicker than that.

Get the new parts, get the engine cleaned and stripped of all parts, and bring your machine shop the girdle/mains, the new bearings and rings, rods, and pistons. Have them sort out all the details and inspections.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Doing it myself.dont have money for the shop. Plus i dont even like take my car to shop.some months ago i took my car to a shop to find out what causing my miss fire and they took off the brake booster hose and didn't put it back and i almost had an accident. I paid two hundred dollars for a irregular idling i was having and they claimed that its fixed and as soon as i drove off about 3 minutes after i started to have the same issue so whatever i can do i do and whatever i dont know, i Google or youtube and find out stuff on here..thank you anyway.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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so, you have the mill to cut the sleeves/hone the sleeves to spec? youre gonna mic the bore to see how much out of round it is.

and since you have already done this, you know for fact that your bore is still stock specs, since they don't wear and oval.

itd be a shame if they needed to be cut .5mm to make them round again. but hey, shouldn't be a ton of oil getting around the rings.


find you a napa that has a machine shop. go there and ask the old timers to check it for you
 

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Do you have a piston ring grinder? Do you have a bore caliper to verify cylinders are good? do you have a ridge reamer for the tops of the bore? do you have plasti-gauge to check clearances? do you have assembly lube? do you have the means to basically make the engine clean enough inside to eat off of? do you have a scale to verify the rods are matching or within reasonable weight of each other? also for piston weights. do you have multiple torque wrenches for the various nuts and bolts? are you familiar with torque down techniques for rod bolts, understanding thread stretch?

A couple hundred bucks at a machine shop is worthwhile. They know what they are doing, and shitty machine shops disappear like a fart in the wind, so find one that has been around a while. Provide them details on any parts outside of factory specs (such as if you intend to do higher compression), else let them earn their wages.


So you had a shit experience at a shop. If you never went back and asked them to fix their screwup and HOLD them accountable, you enabled that behavior indirectly by not calling them out on it.

I too have had shit experience at a shop, but I still take things to a good shop when I am out of time. Not every shop is crap!!

Regardless however you procede, get as much information as possible. Its awesome to learn, but more important to know when and when not to tackle certain things.

If this is specifically a spare car with no real time limit, go ahead, invest in some tools, and do it yourself. But understand all the tools to do it proeprly will cost more than a single machine shop visit.

Especially if you have to do anything to the cylinder head, which needs inspection as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
so, you have the mill to cut the sleeves/hone the sleeves to spec? youre gonna mic the bore to see how much out of round it is.

and since you have already done this, you know for fact that your bore is still stock specs, since they don't wear and oval.

itd be a shame if they needed to be cut .5mm to make them round again. but hey, shouldn't be a ton of oil getting around the rings.


find you a napa that has a machine shop. go there and ask the old timers to check it for you
I got me a 240 grade flex hone.4" to be exact.
 

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BATSLOMAN GIVES NO FUCKS.
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4" is too big.

dingleberry serves to deglaze cylinders, so it will NOT solve any ovaling or "skirting" of cylinders (bottoms larger than tops)


I cannot stress enough, when rebuilding an engine, be sure you do NOT have a time limit or crunch, as that will drag down, and it will make the learning experience less enjoyable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
4" is too big.

dingleberry serves to deglaze cylinders, so it will NOT solve any ovaling or "skirting" of cylinders (bottoms larger than tops)


I cannot stress enough, when rebuilding an engine, be sure you do NOT have a time limit or crunch, as that will drag down, and it will make the learning experience less enjoyable.
I do research of what size flex hone to buy and everyone mentioned 4" for 75mm cylinder.
 

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how is 4" good for 75mm cylinder when 75mm equals 2.95 inches?

How do you plan on stuffing a 4inch device into a 3inch hole?
 
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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Well like i said earlier, i did researched on the size and everyone said 4" is what i need. To be honest it dont look as it 4" to me. I have it and the head gasket here and put it to the cyl hole on the head gasket and it seems ok. Do you know the Ring gap clearance for my D17 1.7 4cyl? I lend someone my repair manual and i haven't get it back yet. Edit for surety, i just measured it with my tape measure and its exactly 31/8 so its fine. It cant be exactly 3".

If you know the clearance for rings gap please provide me with them.
 

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Dont rely on that type of information from posts.

find and download the freely available tech manuals.

It sounds "asshole-ish" of me to say this, but if you cannot be resourceful enough to find the free tech manuals available, you might not be prepared for an engine rebuild.

It only takes ONE single step going wrong with an engine rebuild for the whole thing to come crashing down.

Good luck. When you find the tech manual, take a gander at all the tools needed. Honda lists them in the beginning of the manual. you NEED a few special tools to do this properly. Nothing crazy expensive though.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Dont rely on that type of information from posts.

find and download the freely available tech manuals.

It sounds "asshole-ish" of me to say this, but if you cannot be resourceful enough to find the free tech manuals available, you might not be prepared for an engine rebuild.

It only takes ONE single step going wrong with an engine rebuild for the whole thing to come crashing down.

Good luck. When you find the tech manual, take a gander at all the tools needed. Honda lists them in the beginning of the manual. you NEED a few special tools to do this properly. Nothing crazy expensive though.
Ok thanks forvthe information.
 

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Ok thanks forvthe information.
Sonnnn, I've gotta say, i've been in your shoes! Lol I've rebuilt my KA24DE, a VG30E, a 5SFE, a B6, a BP (turboed) and a D16Z6 (which I turbocharged and have been driving for about 4k now on 14psi with a T3). I never took either of them to a machine shop either, I honed them with the 3 toed unit and visually checked for irregularities. And I forgot to gap the rings on each and every friggin one of those builds for some unknown reason hahahaha NONE EVER BLEW or run wonky! So I'm with you the way you want to go about it! But don't be me, gap your rings and tighten stuff to spec you'll be fine. I watched my boy build a bunch of B, D, H, and K series in his mom's garage that he never took to shops and they were all street raced and never failed under normal circumstances.
 
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