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EC3, ED8, ED9, EE5
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One question of clarification and one of curiosity in the Shock Tech article:

Viking Article said:
The resistance generated by the downward force is known as compression dampening and the resistance generated by the upward force is known as rebound dampening.
This reads incorrect. The upward force (wheel into the chassis) is compression and the downward force (wheel extending out of the chassis) is rebound.

Viking Article said:
2) Transfer weight from one corner to another to maximize chassis response.
How does a damper transfer weight?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
This reads incorrect. The upward force (wheel into the chassis) is compression and the downward force (wheel extending out of the chassis) is rebound.
What I said is correct, but it's not as clear as it should be. I'm talking from the spring's POV, not the wheel. It would probably be easier for people to understand the wheel. I'll fix that.

How does a damper transfer weight?
So the primary force transfer is the dynamic acceleration of the vehicle itself.

However, the sprung mass itself can generate additional loads depending on it's velocity relative to the vehicle and the roll centers. For example, you hit a bump, the wheel compresses the suspension and the force is exerted into the chassis. The chassis will then oscillate depending on the dampening.

The body moving up / down creates force. The dampening ability of the shock is the primary resistance to this. This is heavily utilized in drag racing by using squat / anti-squat geometry in conjunction with dynamically increasing tire diameter (slicks) which shoves the CoG higher and generates a large momentary increase in tire grip.

Also, a firmer static gas pressure in a shock acts like an increased spring rate. The increased corner stiffness has an effect on static weight distribution if it's different from other corners.
 

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98 Civic HX D16Y5
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I'm sorry, but its damping, not dampening.

Nothing is getting wet.
Merriam-Webster said:
dampen
verb damp·en \dam-pen\
Simple Definition of dampen

: to make (something) somewhat or slightly wet : to make (something) damp

: to make (something) less strong or active


Technically you both are right.
 

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94 Integra
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Actually look at the wikipedia entry near the bottom, "errors in popular usage", it appears "damping" is preferred. I think the Shock Tech page is missing a picture in the middle, past the first pic under Digressive vs. Linear Valving.

Overall lots of great info in one spot, thanks. I was recently curious about why Koni Yellows' adjustment was for rebound only, I didn't think rebound affected weight transfer as much.
 
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