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Discussion Starter #1
So I cracked my radiator at Buttonwillow and I changed the radiator, thermostat, and the sensor on the housing. Immediately, my dad and I tried to bleed the cooling system. We filled the radiator, ran the engine, refilled the radiator, keep running, refilled again... but the fan wouldn't kick on and the lower coolant hose was cold. So we took out the thermostat and jumpered the fan to be always on to get us home. We bled the cooling system with the thermostat out and drove home without issues. Once home, we plugged the fan back in and it kicked on, which means the sensor works.

We have yet to test the thermostat, but we were thinking that there was just so much air in the system that the thermostat wouldn't open. Any thoughts? I tried to do as much research as I could at the track, but I didn't have very good internet.
 

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Stole this casue it was easier then typing it:

The OEM thermostat for the OBD2 D-series engine begins to open at ~180* and is fully open by ~195*. The radiator fan kicks on ~205*. Water boils at 212*.

Make sure you have the heater control set to full hot (so that coolant can circulate through the heater core) but make sure the fan is OFF (so that it's not trying to cool the coolant you're waiting around on to get hot).

Leave the radiator cap off. Helms says to "leave it loose". I can only guess this is to prevent coolant from spilling out while air bubbles are being purged. I just leave the funnel sticking out of the radiator neck.

Fill the system with coolant, start the car and refill as needed. Stand around and wait for the cooling fan to at least come on once. I've NEVER waited a second time. If after the cooling fan kicks on once and you still see air bubbles, then wait some more. But in general, you really don't even need to wait till the cooling fan kicks on. By that time, you're assured that the thermostat has fully opened - or was suppose to.

As long as you follow these steps I am leaning towards bad "new" thermostat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did leave the heater on full hot with the fan off. I basically did exactly what you described and the fan never kicked on. I guess I'll test that thermostat later and find out what's going on.
 

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The factory way of bleeding those systems on the later models sucks. Especially the EM2's... But yours is a '00.

As long as it's not overheating any, just continue doing what you're doing. Once the thermostat opens, it'll be a couple minutes more until the fan kicks on. The hose being cold still means it's not opened yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It was an Autozone one (closest parts store from the track) and the temperature was rising past normal was we waited and the thermostat never opened. I'm gonna test thermostat tonight.
 

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Just tested the Autozone one and it opens. My dad and I figure there was probably so much air in the cooling system that the coolant couldn't circulate up to the t-stat or something. I'm definitely in the market for a Mishimoto radiator now, though.
 

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exact same thing happened to me... i was waiting and waiting for the fan to kick on and it never did.. next thing you know my temps were going past normal.. i'm like wth i just put in a brand new t-stat.. got all the air out and now its all good
 

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If your doing coolant work..

Time to invest:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/lil-24680/overview/



When you have a problem bleeding, there is an old trick for when the heater core is emptied.

1) Jack up the front ONLY at least 1 ft up
2) Set-up the system for bleeding
3) Warm to temp, with above item hooked up, and shut off (15 mins)
4) Repeat 3 or 4 times
5) Last go around, increase height as high as safely possible, "force" bleed it (2-2.5k rpm), and let it cool for at least 2 hours.

Even the most problematic Hondas have gotten cleared out of air with the above technique. Seriously, even duel heater core systems in the mini vans cant beat the above.

Edit: Before putting the stopper in on the funnel, squeeze the upper hose. Will make it a truly spill free event ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'll probably have to try this if my temperature is still acting up when I put the thermostat back in. Thanks for the bleeding process!
 
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