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VTEC withdrawals
i "ride" yo momma
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1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so i figured id add this to the mass amount of knowledge on the site. this is straight from ngk's web site and can help peeps decide if they need different plugs and what colder plugs actually do to help the motor.

NGK.com

Heat range

The term spark plug heat range refers to the speed with which the plug can transfer heat from the combustion chamber to the engine head. Whether the plug is to be installed in a boat, lawnmower or racecar, it has been found the optimum combustion chamber temperature for gasoline engines is between 500°C–850°C. When it is within that range it is cool enough to avoid pre-ignition and plug tip overheating (which can cause engine damage), while still hot enough to burn off combustion deposits which cause fouling.

The spark plug can help maintain the optimum combustion chamber temperature. The primary method used to do this is by altering the internal length of the core nose, in addition, the alloy compositions in the electrodes can be changed. This means you may not be able to visually tell a difference between heat ranges. When a spark plug is referred to as a “cold plug”, it is one that transfers heat rapidly from the firing tip into the engine head, which keeps the firing tip cooler. A “hot plug” has a much slower rate of heat transfer, which keeps the firing tip hotter.

An unaltered engine will run within the optimum operating range straight from the manufacturer, but if you make modifications such as a turbo, supercharger, increase compression, timing changes, use of alternate racing fuels, or sustained use of nitrous oxide, these can alter the plug tip temperature and may necessitate a colder plug. A rule of thumb is, one heat range colder per modification or one heat range colder for every 75–100hp you increase. In identical spark plug types, the difference from one full heat range to the next is the ability to remove 70°C to 100°C from the combustion chamber.

The heat range numbers used by spark plug manufacturers are not universal, by that we mean, a 10 heat range in Champion is not the same as a 10 heat range in NGK nor the same in Autolite. Some manufacturers numbering systems are opposite the other, for domestic manufacturers (Champion, Autolite, Splitfire), the higher the number, the hotter the plug. For Japanese manufacturers (NGK, Denso), the higher the number, the colder the plug.

Do not make spark plug changes at the same time as another engine modification such as injection, carburation or timing changes as in the event of poor results, it can lead to misleading and inaccurate conclusions (an exception would be when the alternate plugs came as part of a single precalibrated upgrade kit). When making spark plug heat range changes, it is better to err on the side of too cold a plug. The worst thing that can happen from too cold a plug is a fouled spark plug, too hot a spark plug can cause severe engine damage
 

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VTEC withdrawals
i "ride" yo momma
Joined
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1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
bump

and

to be completely honest....shouldnt this be stickied?
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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40,570 Posts
we have enough damn stickies.........and people wanting to rev to 9k in there D15's.......
 

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Premium Member
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601 Posts
Like any other poor sod driven to use the search engine on these forums, I often pause to look far off into the distance and dream of a fully interactive index of information that will cease all the repetitive questions by wave after wave of noobs, and make the senior members turn into vile old women.

It would be flash based...just to piss off Steve Jobs...start by what engine you have or take an interest in building...what shell you are using...driving style and intent of build...budget...then location...then it would make tacos...glorious tacos!

sigh...back to the search engine.
 

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VTEC withdrawals
i "ride" yo momma
Joined
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1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
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