Honda D Series Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
To all Gurus;
Exospeed,Transzex,and any of the other REAL builders who are banking from experience, here is a formula for what I feel is a responsibly built engine. Answers and Input are awaited eagerly, flames are not.

a naturally aspirated engine assembled correctly ie. matching valve train (all crower, all supertech, all manley...all whatever reputable Company.), a sleeved block (stock rod ratio,one size over pistons), balanced, forged pistons, A/M Rods (again a reasonably matched pair), a street comp ratio say oh 11.0:1. Basically a well put together and fun street engine, factor in good maintence, correct break-in and tuning, fuel management that is appropriate for pump gas and a driver that doesn't beat that everloving hell out of the engine, material wear time...bronze valve guides...Titanium retainers...forged pistons(how long are these actually supposed to perform?) now factor out any unforseen mechanical failure due to defect.
How long do you guys guess this thing would live in my described "perfect" world? A year? 5yrs? 30K? 200k? This isn't a question on how to build a "bulletproof" engine, merely something that I have wondered about for some time and never found an answer to. There are a lot of similar questions posed on this board but none that encompass everything that I have here, I think.
This is what I know about the following materials as used in our engines, for example titanium is a very strong yet soft metal and magnesium is the same, bronze has great lubricant properties but is softer than factory steel, last forged pistons are strong but their expansion rate is less consistent than the rate of a cast piston.
Thank you all in advance for reading my lame and long post and any answers that will shed some light on those of us who don't know it all.
 
E

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
A fully built motor, if built with the right parts and properly, should last as long as a stock motor if used under the same conditions as a stock motor.

Of course, there will be several factors that can change longevity on a fully built motor.

High compression or boosted applications. In extreme cases where the enthusiast is putting the engine to more stress than the average engine, of course the lifetime will be cut shorter.
To me a an example of a motor that is to the edge would be something like a 11.5:1 compression LS/VTEC with a built head and lets say one of our All Motor street cams.
Running on 91 octane daily. Anything over that is not your average motor.
And in turbo applications, if you're just keeping it at about 7-10psi, then the motor should last pretty long as long as theres proper fuel management. It only takes 1 bad time when its lean for the motor to give out.

As I mentioned on the all motor setup above, we built a similar setup about 4-5 years ago and it has put over 100K miles on it already and still going strong. Its not raced often but more of a fast daily driver. but it shows that it can last pretty long, despite the LS/VTEC myths.

Wil
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,237 Posts
Really depends on how much you LEAN on the motor.

IMHO a "built" motor like something Wil would ship out, I'd drop the oil pan every 2 years/30,000 miles with MY driving style.

I run "cheap" oil in 5w30 be it from Exxon, Pennzoil, Castrol, etc. I can it at 2500-3000 miles during "race" weather, and at 4500-5000 during the winter. Basically change the oil at end of November and it is good thing spring thaw.

Purolator or STP filters.

This is just my exp. with my two ABUSED Honda SOHC's.
 
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks wil and tranzex. The summary of your answers tells me that a well built engine is just that and will perform for a long time when actually taken care of.
I had figured as much only I wanted to hear from those that actually have a X years old engine in their daily car.
 
E

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Liek I've said before, life expectancy depends on how its used and how much stress is being put on the motor.

Lets say a customer gets a Stage 4 Exospeed Block from us. A fully built sleeved turbo b18A block. It can either be used on the street or for a full race setup. We have on one of our friends CRX a street setup pushing 500hp at 18psi and its been running strong without a rebuild for a couple years now.
THen you have in contrast, the same block used in the Cookie Graphics Gold Integra that is pushing 600-700hp in the Hot Rod class and that motor is tore down for new bearings every 3-4 races. We redo the block as well with new pistons and rods, etc every 6-8 races. The blocks are still good after the few races, but with competition and points races on the line, you want to be at tip top shape and have the best performing engine everytime you go out there. Hence the rebuild after a few races.

but in general, like Transzex mentioned, good maintenance with frequent oil change and proper maintenance promotes long life for any engine.
 

·
Premium Member
95 CX Hatch
Joined
·
5,910 Posts
Great feedback fellas. I have also pondered this same question. I am currently bulding my project Z6, sleeved forged blah blah and will be using as a daily drivin street/strip car. I commute 80-100 miles per day round trip and drag race every other weekend (points nights). Of course I have sat out this season due to too many broken parts but will be getting back into the swing of things next spring. I have high hopes to be pushing 350+hp at the wheels and roughly 14-15ish psi on the street with 93 octane and 18-20psi at the strip on high octane. Dyno numbers and tuning will tell ultimatly how much boost I need for my goals. Not looking for an all out strip beast but a very powerful single cam thats built tough AND reliable. Like Bone I tear my engines down every 25-30k as I do drive them hard! My last stock engine at 10 psi made it to 265,000 miles before it was due for a full rebuild. Proper tuning and excellent maintenence is the key. Oil changes every 2500-3k (overkill to some but not for me down here in FL). Again great post guys!
 

·
Brokedick Millionaire
Joined
·
40,237 Posts
I must add, my 135 hp, 118 WHP D15B7 will be put back into service this fall/winter. All I did was use a brass wire brush on the piston tops and have the head mildly ported. The bottom end at 130,000+ miles looked just fine.

It should be good for 143-145 hp and 14.8 NA with close ratio tranny. Not bad from a 102 HP stock motor.
 
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks zex, for adding that you don't even need the bankruptcy special setup to pickup some decent power for a fun car.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top