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1991 Honda Civic Si
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I recently replaced my pads, rotors, shoes and wheel cylinders, did stainless lines and dot4 fluid. I see, however, that my passenger side wheel is giving off a lot of brake dust-a lot more than the driver side. I am thinking I may have a sticking caliper? I greased the slide pins when I did the pads and rotors. Should I go ahead and replace the caliper?

Leading me to my next question....

I can get a rebuild kit for like $30 bucks all Honda. I can also order a centric caliper off of Rockauto for just a few dollars more shipped. Is a rebuilt Honda caliper better? My time is precious nowadays, so if the quality is not there in the rebuild, I would rather buy it and pop it in.

Thanks in advance.

Brian
 

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What kind of grease did you use to lube the slide pins?


Time is money and if you are short on it I'd get the rebuild.
 

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I had to replace my entire breaking system for my GMC Safari cause it was just park for the las 2-3 years behind my house and the whole system was rusted out. I posted this not to long ago hoping that It will help somebody:

Rather than sending the stuff to the machine shop to get cut I decide to buy everything new, when it comes to break I don't play around. So while I was looking around trying to find a way to save money I came across this site. http://www.retailmenot.com/ and I was able to get me some coupons code that you save 35% - 40% at advance auto. So I got me some new rotors and pads and I save my self $40 and the order was ready for pick up in minutes at the store.

The total amount for the parts that I need will be a little over $300 this is including new battery for my van, I'm gonna be able to divide my order in 3 $100 orders, use the coupon code and in total I will save myself $120. which is awesome!!!

Hope this info help some of you guys!!


If I was you I will go ahead and replace both caliper in the front just to be sure, I will be doing this shortly since I'm upgrading for bigger brakes in the front for my Civic DX. I already have the hub assembly out of a EX sedan, I just want to install new front wheel bearings, get me some new rotors, hawk pads, and some rebuild Nissin calipers for the front and I'm done.
 

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Meat Popsicle
91 CRX Si
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You could buy the rebuild kit only to find out that the pistons are pitted/scored.

I would go with the remans which should ensure that the piston is in good shape.
 

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1991 Honda Civic Si
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Discussion Starter #5
Okay so remand it is...

Next question! :)

On rockauto they have them listed as loaded (pads and hardware included) and semi-loaded (no pads but hardware). I am assuming I am going to need the hardware?
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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semi-loaded means the caliper bracket and slider pins.

you might as well get semi-loaded since it's way easier and nicer to deal with fresh stuff than taking a nice reman'd caliper and pairing it with a shitty rusty bracket.


also I'd recommend using some caliper paint and spraying them to prevent further rust
 

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Did you measure the brake pads or are you just stabbing at it due to dust??

Measure the pad, a 1 mm (or less) difference is normal.

If you used the wrong lube for the slide pins, they will stick.

If you did not lube them correctly, they will stick.
 

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1991 Honda Civic Si
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Discussion Starter #8
Ok so I will pick up a semi-loaded set. I will definitely paint them. I have koseis so I figured I would just to keep the setup looking decent.

@99EJ6T: I picked up a thing of grease from advance. I asked someone there was to use and they picked it up for me. This:


I believe before hand it was giving off a lot of dust too. It's hard for me to remember because I was so busy at the time and never had time to pay attention to the car.
 

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Yeah wheel bearing/multipurpose grease isn't the right kind. You need a non melting synthetic lubricant, this may by the right stuff if it is non melting but usually if it says wheel bearing grease it isn't the right stuff.
 

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@99EJ6T: I picked up a thing of grease from advance. I asked someone there was to use and they picked it up for me. This:
Sadly, most people dont know any better then to use multipurpose grease for everything related to a car. Being in the field, I have seen that grease on everything under a car. Even though its actual place on a car is VERY limited. By far the most common place I find it, on guide/slide pins when a car goes to an aftermarket company for a brake job. So, what should you use? Well how about....



Its applicable to ANY slide pins, including motorcycles. So long as the dust boot for the pin is in good shape, this will have no problems keeping the pin lubricated for the life of the pad. DO NOT GET IT ON THE BRAKE PAD AND ITS NOT TO GREASE THE SHIMS/BACKING PLATE.

Edit: Ask me what I use for brake jobs......at Honda ;) ;)
 

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I've always used this and had decent results...tho I am open to ideas, as always, to a better way....



** Also, though for some this may go without saying, CLEAN THE SHIT OUT OF THOSE PINS AND GUIDES prior to lubing and re-assembly, make it shine, like new...and they just might work like new
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmmm okay then. Lol. I didn't see that at the Advance I went to, but that one was a little smaller than normal. I will try to the local one where I'm stationed now. So I guess I will try lubing them and seeing if that helps first, then if that does not work I will move on to replacing the caliper.
 

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Most auto parts stores sell little single use packets of caliper lube for like $2 or less...as a career parts guy, I have to say the chump who sold you brake pads but didn't offer a proper lube might not be the right guy to be talking to lol
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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I've used antiseize before and didn't have any issues, but next time I'm getting a tube of the proper lube
 

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2000 Honda Civic Dx
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I have a bunch of brake-lube packets that came with OEM brake pads from when I was working at a Honda dealership a few years back. I apply it on backing plates, the tabs (part that contacts the caliper bracket and hold the pads in place) and sliding pins. Never had a problem with any car that I used it on.

At O'reilly's (formerly known as Kragen) they sold "synthetic" stuff. But it usually dried and flaked off after a while. In a pinch I use anti-seize with no problems.
 

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1991 Honda Civic Si
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Discussion Starter #16
I went ahead and tried lubing up the slide pins with the proper lube this time. I bought the permatex stuff. The upper slide pin on the passenger side caliper was seized to the mount. I had to hammer it off with a rubber mallet. I got it off, hit it with brake cleaner and sand paper, then lubed it up really well. I think that will do it. There is some brake dust on my wheel after just over 100 miles, but it looks pretty even on both sides so far... Hoping that took care of it!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So a week has gone by and the passenger wheel is looking substantially dirtier than the driver side wheel. Anything else I can try before replacing the caliper?
 

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Yeah, that stuck pin was likely the cause of the original problem, maybe it needs to be replaced? Just make sure the new one is properly lubed and you should be good. Like snailslow said, fortunately, the parts are cheap...
 
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