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94 Integra
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This guide shows you how to install Bosch EV14-style injectors into a Honda D16Z6. Disclaimer: This involves raw fuel and can be dangerous. Follow all safety requirements set forth in the factor service manual. You are responsible for your own safety!

Bosch EV14 fuel injectors are fairly similar to the OEM Honda injectors (made by Keihin), although Honda uses a different sealing method in their 1990's B/D/H/F intake manifolds. This guide will work for virtually all of those manifolds & engine types. One minor difference is some OBD2 manifolds used "air injection", which amounts to allowing air to flow into the manifold around the injector tips via tiny holes. The holes may have to be plugged or the vacuum source (nipple or hose) sealed. The other difference is some JDM motors use shorter injectors that looks like early F20C injectors, identified with a slim body with a large flange near the outlet. For these you must install taller USDM-spec fuel rail studs.


First: you must uninstall the original injectors. PLEASE follow the factory service manual's instructions TO THE LETTER. To sum it up, disconnect the battery, depressurize the system via the petcock on the fuel filter outlet, drain the fuel rail & inlet hose, then remove the 2-3 bolts holding the fuel rail on. Raw fuel WILL spill, so have a rag handy.



Second: install the EV14 injectors into the fuel rail. First dry any fuel still in the fuel rail holes, next use engine oil to lube the new o-rings (do no reuse old o-rings), then gently press them into the holes evenly. If you aren't careful, they can get pinched, cut, ruined, and leak high-pressure fuel. Not safe! I recommend buna-N or Viton rubber for the inlet o-rings - these particular IN400 injectors came with firm buna-N. Some aftermarket fuel rails may have slightly larger outlet holes and may have problems sealing virtually any injector, not just EV14's. I do not recommend aftermarket rails for Honda's - the OEM rails can flow enough gasoline for 1000-2000cc injectors.



Third: install the original style lower seals into the intake manifold holes; do NOT install them onto the injectors first. Lubricate the lower seal on the top & insides with motor oil. The lip on the bottom of the black plastic body is what will be sealing against the lower seal. The silver parts of the injector outlet WILL be loose side to side in the seal, especially if you are reusing them. The green o-rings on the bottom of the EV14 injectors are OPTIONAL. They aid in sealing, but are not needed.

For the best fit, buy a new kit from your local auto parts store, ask for a 92-95 Honda Civic injector seal kit. If non-stock injectors were used previously (Precision, DSM, etc), they may have been stretched too wide and will require replacement.



Fourth: place the fuel rail & injectors into the manifold seals. If you kept the green o-rings, this will require a lot of lube and a lot of force. The only way to "cheat" is to put the seals on the injector first until the green o-rings are no longer visible, then pressing the rail/injector/seal combo into the manifold holes. Not recommended for the novice. This image shows the injectors installed just past the green o-rings, but not all the way. NOTE: Many EV14 injectors have directional atomizer plates that require a certain injector angle; the picture below shows a 30 degree rotation to the right (the connector is pushed towards the passenger side) for the injector closest to the camera. These InjectorNation.com IN400's should be clocked 30-45 degrees to the right.



Fifth: tighten the 3 bolts down to finger tight, then use a wrench to seat the rail against the black plastic fuel rail shims. Alternate between the nuts and only do 1-2 turns before going to the next. Once you check that all 4 injectors are seated into the intake manifold lower seals and "clocked" to the correct angle, tighten the nuts down to the torque spec listed in the factory service manual. The pictured rail shows the rail just before the final torque setting, note the tiny gap between the rail and the front half of the plastic shim. NOTE: EV14's all have a small circle cast into the black plastic body on their left side near the outlet, visible in the picture below. A proper install height puts this circle just below the top of the lower manifold seal.



Sixth: double-check that all the seals are slightly indented as shown in the picture below. If not, you have the incorrect seal. Honda had 3 different seal types: a thick soft seal, a thin hard seal, and a thin soft seal. The thick soft seal is most common on OBD1 intake manifolds. OBD2 intake manifolds usually use a thin soft seal stacked on top of a thin hard seal. Both types will work, but you MUST ensure that the top of the exposed seal is flush with the manifold casting and not recessed. Auto parts stores will sometimes include both soft style seals or just the thick soft seal. Check the bottom of this post for a picture of all three together.




The last step is to ensure you tighten the petcock on the fuel filter (new crush rings are recommended) & reconnect the battery. Prime the pump (turn the key to ON/RUN for 2-4 seconds once or twice) then check for leaks between the fuel rail and injectors. Have your tuner alter the engine management system (EMS) for the new inejctors. They WILL require different settings, possibly an entire re-tune due to flow differences.
 

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94 Integra
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Discussion Starter #2
Here are the 3 different lower intake manifold seals shown together. The best option is the thick soft ring on the left. The seals on the right require the hard ring placed into the intake manifold hole FIRST, then the soft ring on top.



Some EV14 injectors require height extenders aka "tophats". Pictured are IN1000 injectors with tophats installed into a D16Z6 intake manifold:



Most EV14 connectors will have a modern USCAR connector aka EV6. They will require wired or wireless adapters, or new USCAR clips crimped onto your existing harness. I do not recommend soldering. A decent crimp with a touch of WD40 or electronics corrosion inhibitor will conduct just as well, but make sure you seal it with 1-2 layers of heat shrink. Electrical tape will work, but fuel & oil usually eats away the adhesive. Shown are an OBD1 Honda (Keihin) injector on the right and a Bosch EV14 injector with a USCAR connector on the left. NOTE: the marked polarity of the EV14 injector is possitive lead on the right ("+" on the right deep inside the connector), while the Honda clips are generally wired the opposite. Polarity can be reversed with no harm done since the EV14 injectors omit the flyback diode sometimes added to solenoids; your ECU already has flyback diodes in the ECU's injector driver circuitry.



Below shows how to connect the wireless adapter to your harness & injector. Just clip the adapter onto you injector, then clip the engine harness onto the adapter. OBD1 injector on the left, EV14 with an OBD1 wireless adapter in the center, EV14 injector with OBD2 wireless adapter & OBD2 harness clip installed on the right. NOTE: Honda OBD1 clips are keyed differently from OBD0 clips and OBD2 clips; OBD0 clips are actually standard EV1 clips while OBD2 clips are Honda-specific. I mention this because wireless adapters are only manufactured for EV1/OBD0 clips and OBD2 clips and must be modified to fit OBD1 harness clips properly. The OBD1 adapter shown below has been pre-modified by InjectorNation.com and the keyway removed.

 

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Two men shy of a group
99 civic sedan ex
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why do you not recommend soldering? i have some fuel injector clinic 525 cc that were on my boosted hx, i made my own adapter with a obd2 male pigtail crimped to a ev14 female adapter. when i swapped everything over to my ex sedan i decided to shorted the pigtails and solder it this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
For one I think a LOT more people can crimp halfway decent than can solder. Most people couldn't use a soldering iron to fight their way out of a wet paper bag.

Even when the ability is present, it's still a weaker connection that can break apart from vibration. A proper crimp will not. A lot of plane & boat standards actually forbid solder as the sole means for electrical connections - you can solder ONLY AFTER crimping. Most if not all car manufacturers require techs to crimp and specifically NOT to solder repairs. One military study showed 0.0073 crimp failures per million hours, and they're every bit as rough on them as our race cars can be. To put that in perspective, the average US male lives for 630k hours. I consider myself very good at soldering, yet I've seen my own solders joints fail.

Another aspect is corrosion, mostly due to flux. I've been soldering for over 2 decades and I still have some projects with those 15-20yr original solder joints. I thought I had removed enough flux, but there was enough to show corrosion after a few years. Some flux gets pushed into the wire strands under the insulation, that's usually the worst because you can't see it. Meanwhile the crimped connections on the mech speed control I pulled off my 25-30yr old Tamya Clodbuster are still fine. I've even seen entire neighborhoods come in with copper pipe leaks (I used to work in a hardware store) because the company that built all their homes had a plumber that used a shitload of flux on the cold pipes. I highly recommend using alcohol or flux cleaner on all your solder joints before sealing them in shrink tube or tape.

Lastly it comes down to time. I'm all for making shit look pretty, but if it's going to be hidden I'd rather get it done. That's not to say the quality of the work is any less, if anything I can use the saved time to put a little bit extra quality into it.


The only down side to crimping is you need all sorts of different crimp connections and in some cases special crimping tools. I recently scored a nice ratcheting tool with interchangeable jaws that works great, and the various jaws are availible for only $5/set from ebay/china. I've also built up a sizable collection of different crimps. My most recent addition has been bare butt splices. They take up about the same space as solder, get covered with shrink tubing like solder, are more secure than solder, but take a fraction of the time.
 

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Two men shy of a group
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I don't know much about solder but I have joined a few pieces together lol, I'm pretty sure I have not used Flux though, is that bad?
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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I don't know much about solder but I have joined a few pieces together lol, I'm pretty sure I have not used Flux though, is that bad?
most solders have flux mixed with them ,add flux if you have the need for extra cleaning.
 

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So are top hats gonna be needed on a d16z6 skunk 2 pro manifold? In900
 

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94 Integra
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Discussion Starter #10
No they shouldn't need tophats, the Skunk2 IM for the D16 was designed for longer injectors & the OEM fuel rail. The IN900's for B/D/H/F-series are a slightly longer length & the inlets are machined down to 11mm to fit the smaller fuel rail holes. To say it another way, they're the same length & inlet size as ID1000's that have tophats installed. I don't have pics of a Skunk2 IM, but something similar:


 

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Never finishes (TWSS)
91 Civic SI hb
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Nice man, thanks. Also is this how k20 injectors are installed i believe they are the same EV14 injectors just different cc?
 

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94 Integra
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Discussion Starter #13
It's still up at Injector Nation, it's just the DOTcom domain that registerDOTcom has hijacked until the transfer is complete.


I'll be able to take some pictures of a K20 install shortly. They actually install just like the OEM K20 injectors.

Both use the same outer diameter upper & lower o-rings, and they're placed the same distance apart. Same for the groove the clips sit in, except the clips are a little tighter in the rear. The clips are only needed to keep the injectors in the rail when removed from the manifold, virtually zero aftermarket rails retain the use of the clips.

I still recommend a little bit of engine oil for lube on both o-rings. Silicone is a bad idea since it gets eaten by the fuel and passed through your injectors & engine.
 

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98 Civic HX D16Y5
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I know this is from a few months back but...
For one I think a LOT more people can crimp halfway decent than can solder. Most people couldn't use a soldering iron to fight their way out of a wet paper bag.

Even when the ability is present, it's still a weaker connection that can break apart from vibration. A proper crimp will not. A lot of plane & boat standards actually forbid solder as the sole means for electrical connections - you can solder ONLY AFTER crimping. Most if not all car manufacturers require techs to crimp and specifically NOT to solder repairs. One military study showed 0.0073 crimp failures per million hours, and they're every bit as rough on them as our race cars can be. To put that in perspective, the average US male lives for 630k hours. I consider myself very good at soldering, yet I've seen my own solders joints fail.

Another aspect is corrosion, mostly due to flux. I've been soldering for over 2 decades and I still have some projects with those 15-20yr original solder joints. I thought I had removed enough flux, but there was enough to show corrosion after a few years. Some flux gets pushed into the wire strands under the insulation, that's usually the worst because you can't see it. Meanwhile the crimped connections on the mech speed control I pulled off my 25-30yr old Tamya Clodbuster are still fine. I've even seen entire neighborhoods come in with copper pipe leaks (I used to work in a hardware store) because the company that built all their homes had a plumber that used a shitload of flux on the cold pipes. I highly recommend using alcohol or flux cleaner on all your solder joints before sealing them in shrink tube or tape.

Lastly it comes down to time. I'm all for making shit look pretty, but if it's going to be hidden I'd rather get it done. That's not to say the quality of the work is any less, if anything I can use the saved time to put a little bit extra quality into it.


The only down side to crimping is you need all sorts of different crimp connections and in some cases special crimping tools. I recently scored a nice ratcheting tool with interchangeable jaws that works great, and the various jaws are availible for only $5/set from ebay/china. I've also built up a sizable collection of different crimps. My most recent addition has been bare butt splices. They take up about the same space as solder, get covered with shrink tubing like solder, are more secure than solder, but take a fraction of the time.
My one comment that has little relevance to D-series stuff...

My Dad has been a diesel truck mechanic for 40+years and he crimps everything he works on diesel, gas, or electric appliances, etc...
But he recently was trained to diagnose problems via the computer of the International Maxxforce trucks he was working on and because the computer read measurements from all the sensors in milliVolts all new connections, splices, repairs involving the computer had to be soldered due to the much lower resistance in solder compared to crimps... just thought you guys might find that interesting
 

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Classic Man
Civic
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I know this is from a few months back but...

My one comment that has little relevance to D-series stuff...

My Dad has been a diesel truck mechanic for 40+years and he crimps everything he works on diesel, gas, or electric appliances, etc...
But he recently was trained to diagnose problems via the computer of the International Maxxforce trucks he was working on and because the computer read measurements from all the sensors in milliVolts all new connections, splices, repairs involving the computer had to be soldered due to the much lower resistance in solder compared to crimps... just thought you guys might find that interesting
You are assuming the person soldering knows what they are doing. Anyone can fuck up anything.
 
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