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Discussion Starter #1
Simply question really. I am thinking about a 3 stone hone but they make a 2 stone hone and a bottle brush. I also seen a sponge type hone but I don't think that is my bag.

So which is the best hone and why?


What is the best grit? Any benefit to running different Grits? Should I run a lower grit then higher grit? Say 220 then 440?

Thanks
 

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one grumpy old man
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i like dingle balls.hahahahaha
 

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()*#$(*$
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I prefer bottle-brush hones. They are more forgiving and easier to use, IMO, unless you are practiced with using a 3-stone hone with new or at least cared for stones that haven't been sitting in the bottom of a toolbox getting dusty and chipped.
 

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Same bottle brush hone all the way. :)
 

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Classic Man
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for grit, if u can get a 220 and then a 400, that would be nice.

start with the 220 then finish off with 400.


the bottle hones/dingle balls are easy to use and forgiving.

i like the stone hone tho. the last like 10 engines weve built at the farm have all been stone honed with 220gritt.


so far so good. no bad side effects yet...


heres a pic of what the 220 grit stones give ya...

 

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Boost Gets You Laid
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I used 3-stone jobs. It's getting harder to find bottlebrush hones these days. Never use a rental hone unless the stones look new. Before I bought mine a few years back I went to Auto Stoned to rent one. The one they handed me had all the stones busted. Ended up going to 3 stores before I broke down and bought one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a drill press so I will not be doing it with drill. I was just curious as to which actually renders a better job. The bottle brush seems more orgiving but the 3 stone does a better job?

If there is not much of a glaze can I go ahead and run the 400 grit? The motor was rebuilt not to long ago and it was only pulled for a blown hg (they used a cometic). I am using NPR rings if that makes any difference.
 

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()*#$(*$
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Buy a 3" (~76mm) BBH on eBay for about $35.

Using a press can result in a better job, but the biggest issue is keeping the bores and the hone lubricated. I use ATF every time I use a hone, as it has anti-wear additives than float metal particles away from the cylinder walls. ATF is a magic fluid.

If you are just breaking a glaze, then, yes, you can just use a 400 grit hone, but, again, the BBH grits are different than the stone hone ratings. I used a 200 something grit BBH on a D15 I rebuilt and everything turned out perfectly.

The BBH is more forgiving and does a good job. 3-stone hones are more susceptible to being contaminated from sitting around collecting crud, having cracked edges, or getting fouled from material removed. I dislike them entirely for any kind of DIY rebuild where you aren't getting oversized pistons installed.

Professional stone hones, on the other hand absolutely are the best in the hands of an experienced machinist who is taking his time to measure thing correctly. Just like any other tool, it is the user that dictates how well the finished job will be. I've seen some really hack jobs done with the finest equipment, and I've also seen some really good hone jobs done in a basement with the block sat on the floor.

The key to a good hone job is making sure the hone is spinning before you push it into the cylinder. This is easier, IMO, with a BBH than a three stone. It's messy, but if you cut up a 2-liter soda bottle as a shield, it cuts down on most of the ATF/lube slinging all over the place. I Dunk the hone in a container of ATF between every pass. The proper crosshatch is a combination of rotational speed (should be slow, and if you are using a drill press, use the slowest setting!) and vertical speed. It will take a few tries to get the proper rhythm going.
 

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Classic Man
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i wouldnt use a drill press.

sounds like a lot of work keeping the hone lubricated. and moving the press up and down is going to be a nightmare.


you gotta go pretty quick.
 

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()*#$(*$
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If the press can spin slow enough (there aren't many out there that can, because most are junk made for hacking crap up, not quality work), it will be fine, but, I think that a variable speed, high torque hand drill, especially cordless, would be very useful. (Because that's what I did.)
 

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What are we talking about.
Putting in a new set of rings or going to the next size.
I will carry the engine a 100 miles on my back if I have to but will insist on a proper hone job by a proper machine.
Find somebody who has a Sunnen Cylinder king and take it to them.
First cut I run what ever stone they have 2nd pass I run a 400 Grit and for the last I run a bottle brush. Or what they call a Platue Hone.
What grit you use. Depends on how much metal is being removed. And what clearance you plan to run.
Sunnen 'Cylinder King' Vertical Hone Machine
See the speed and other specs.
 
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