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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Do this at your own risk, I will NOT assume the responsibility of what happens to your car based off of my DIY. These tuning procedures are for a NA non VTEC engine, CONTINUE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!



Hey everybody I wanted to post up a real quick and basic how to on tuning with CROME Pro 1.6.8. Yesterday I had some hands on tuning with my del Sol through CROME Pro using an Ostrich 2.0, and Xtreme Hulog. I had a VERY basic understanding of how tuning worked, but didn't want to attempt it on my own without a knowledgeable tuner showing me what was right and wrong. So from my hands on experience I wanted to write up a quick and basic manual on how to setup Ostrich 2.0, Xtremem Hulog, and getting started on how to tune your own car.

By no means am I an expert tuner, and I don't claim to be. I'm a beginner noobsickle at VERY best. And I'm hoping that more accomplished tuners on this site can point out issues and flaws in my DIY so I can make the changes to the DIY and we can have somewhat of a community how to tune page.

Like I said before, more info will be added as I learn more and as other's on here add the info. But I feel this is a good basic start on how to begin tuning your car using CROME Pro.

Also all the info presented below was done on a laptop with Windows XP.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
1. Device Manager Port Settings Tab: Windows XP
Bits per second: 115200
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1
Flow Control: None
Advanced Button:
COM Port Number: COM3
USB Transfer Sizes:
Receive (Bytes): 4096
Transmit (Bytes): 4096
BM Options:
Latency Timer (msec): 1
Timeouts:
Minimum Read Timeout (msec): 0
Minimum Write Timeout (msec): 0
Miscellaneous Options:
Check next to Serial Enumerator.




Setting up Ostrich 2.0:

2. Ostrich 2.0 setting within Windows COM settings and CROME Pro:
Hardware Type: Moated Devices
Serial COM Settings:
Port: COM3
Baud: 115200
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop Bits: 1
Connection Settings:
Timeout: 250 milliseconds
Max Tries: 3
Auto Connect: Connect to RTP when detected



3. Once these settings are as above, in CROME Pro settings go back to the Real Time Programming tab and click, “Detect Connection”. If CROME Pro detects your Ostrich 2.0 you’re then ready to open up a new basemap, or open up a preexisting basemap.

Before you write the basemap to Ostrich 2.0 make sure you go the [Plugins] tab at the top of the CROME Pro window. Under [Enhancements] be sure to [Reove Checksum Routine] as well as add [Quick Datalogger +RTP].


Then in the [Options] button be sure to adjust all the parameters you’re wanting to modify, also be sure to put a check mark next to [Disable oxygen sensor (open loop)] if you plan on using your wideband sensor for datalogging.


After all of that has been done, you can now [Write] the map to your Ostrich 2.0, after it has been written it is always a good idea to [Verify] the data written to the Ostrich 2.0. If all checks out you can now attempt to start the car.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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1,278 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Setting up Xtreme Hulog:

1. Windows Device Manager Port Settings: Windows XP
Bits per second: 38400
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1
Flow control: None
Advanced Button:
COM Port Number: COM4
USB Transfer Sizes:
Receive (Bytes): 4096
Transmit (Bytes): 4096
BM Options:
Latency Timer (msec): 1
Timeouts:
Minimum Read Timeout (msec): 0
Minimum Write Timeout (msec): 0
Miscellaneous Options:
Make sure there is a check mark next to Serial Enumerator, leave all other options unchecked.
Windows XP Device Manager Settings Xtreme Hulog:




2. CROME Pro Xtreme Huglog Settings:

Under the settings window go to the tab [Tuner Comm] and use the following options:
Serial Protocol: Crome QD2
Serial Com Settings:
Port: COM4
Baud: 38400
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop Bits: 1
Connection Settings:
Timeout: 250 milliseconds
Max Tries: 3

CROME Pro 1.6.8 Tuner Comm Settings:



After the settings in this tab are as they appear above, turn the key of the car in the [ON] position so power is getting to the ECU. Then press the [Test Connection] button, CROME Pro should connect to the ECU. If you get an error check over all of your settings again. If you are connected to the ECU continue onto the next step.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
3. In CROME Pro under the Settings window go to the tab labled [Tuner Logging]. Here you will select what wideband sensor and controller you’re using. For an example I will use my wideband an Innovate LC-1.

Lambda Conversion Table: Innovate
02 Sensor Voltage Air-Fuel Ratio
0.0 7.3
0.50 8.9
4.50 20.9
5.00 22.0

When inputting your tables like above you only really need the values 0.0-5.0 with maybe a couple in between such as the reading one step past 0.0, and the reading before 5.0. CROME Pro can adjust itself and calculate the rest of the readings in between. After your table is setup to the right of the window you will see more settings. Under the [Lambda Recording Conditions (Range)] most of these settings you can leave to the default. But most people including myself will change the [Gear(s)] option to enable RTP to start in all gears. So for an example you can input [1 2 3 4 5] with a space between each number to indicate CROME Pro is to start recording data in all gears.

The [Lambda Offset Correction] is a tool you use in case your wideband controller gauge and the AFR readings are different. If your WB gauge reads 15.1:1 and CROME Pro reads 13.1:1 then you can use the [Lambda Offset Correction] to get CROME Pro reading the same as your WB gauge. Just add or subtract adjustments in most cases by 0.01 (+/-) until you have both readings as close as possible.


After all of these settings are as above you should be ready to enable the [Live Tuning] button at the bottom of the CROME Pro main window. Remember the car must either be running or at the very least have the ignition key in the [ON] position before datalogging will connect to the ECU. If you are still unable to get datalogging to function properly please redo all the steps.



Now that you’ve got your modified basemap successfully written to your Ostrich 2.0, and your Xtreme Hulog reading the ECU. You can now start the first step of tuning your engine, and that begins with idle. One setting that I always check first that is sometimes enabled, that for me is a huge pain to deal with is [Smart Tracking]. [Smart Tracking] is located right next to the [Live Tuning] button at the bottom of the CROME Pro main window. If the [Smart Tracking] button is enabled go ahead and turn it off, the reason for this is because when you go to make adjustments within the fuel map. Whatever you select yourself is what you will be adjusting. With [Smart Tracking] enabled you will only be able to adjust the cell(s) that it has selected. Also you’ll notice there is a small black arrow pointing down next to [Smart Tracking]. Click on it to bring up a small options window. Inside this options window you’ll see things such as, “Single Cell”, “Quad Cell”, “Single Row” ect. The option “Single Cell” is most likely selected, go ahead and choose “Quad Cell”. When “Single Cell” is selected while you’re datalogging a single cell will be highlighted in a light purple shade. Wherever that single cell is located on the fuel maps is where the engine is running within the table. In reality the ECU is never looking at just one cell while running, but is in fact reading that single cell and all the cells around it. So if you were to enable the “Quad Cell” option you will actually have a better view of what the ECU is reading so you can adjust all those cells at the same time instead of one at a time…


 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Also another thing that is good to note, is under the Settings window of CROME Pro under the [General] tab is the [Selection Adjustments]. Here you can setup the adjustments for how much you increase or decrease the individual cell numbers when leaning out or richening the fuel map. I personally like to adjust by 1% at a time.



Now that we have a few of the basic settings setup to our favor the next step is to open up the [Show Target Lambda] window or (F10) shortcut. This window is what you want your target AFR to be, for an example I setup rows 1-7 to 500RPM-7936RPM at around 14.7:1. Column 8 to around 13.6:1, and column 9 and 10 to around 13.3:1. You’ll notice that if you select the entire row at once to adjust that the top row will be obviously richer than the bottom row. But once again these are going to be the target AFR, you’re not going to get every cell in every row and column to these target numbers. But you do want to get as close as you can. You’re numbers will most likely be different from mine. I used these above just as an example.


Also notice that when you’re in F10-F12 windows, whatever cell, row, or column you’ve highlighted will also stay highlighted when you go back to your [Ignition/Fuel Tables] or F9. This way you do not lose the spot on the table you were working on.


With an understanding of everything I’ve explained above you are now ready to start adjusting and tuning your engine. As stated before starting with your idle range 500RPM-1000RPM which would be the first four rows and columns 1-3. Highlight all of these cells, and use your shortcut keys (pg up) to increase the value or richen up the tune. Or (pg dn) to lean out the values and the tune, if you are doing real time tuning you will actually notice instantly a difference in the behavior of your engine. And it should reflect in your AFR gauge readings. I’ve always tried to be around 15.3:1 AFR at idle…


Now that you’ve made your first changes and you’ve noticed the difference in how the engine is running. It’s time to hit the road and start datalogging while you drive around town. It is always smart and safe to have a friend in the passenger’s seat working the laptop while you drive the car.

After you’ve driven around getting a good amount of data in your [Show Lambda Readings] of F11 window. You can take it home or park somewhere to make your adjustments within the cells, rows, and columns of your fuel map. Remember whichever row or column you have highlighted will also reflect in the [Ignition/Fuel Tables] so you can compare the current value to the data retrieved from datalogging.


Within the data retrieved if you see a value for example -6.78% within that specific cell that means you need to ADD roughly that much more fuel to hit your target Lambda value. If you are to see a value such as 6.78% (without the – sign) that means you need to lean out the value by roughly that much. But instead of adjusting that individual cell by itself it’s actually a good idea to highlight that entire column and make the adjustments together. If you go about adjusting each cell by itself you can get a rough tune where in the [Graphs] window you will see the tune have jagged lines and not so smooth transitions from one cell to the next. If you adjust each column together there is a much higher chance of a smooth tune throughout the RPM range and map.

So for example we are looking at column 5 from 500RPM-8000RPM, we notice that the whole column is running a little too rich. We see values going down the column such as .50%, .68%, .72%, 1.10%, 1.80%, 2.05%, 2.61%, 2.94%, 3.20%, 3.05%, 2.90%, 2.66%, 2.10%, 1.83%, 1.55%, 1.09% ect… You can look at the entire column and notice as the RPMs rise the tune becomes increasingly rich and then starts to lean out a little bit. You can take all the values and get a general idea how much you want to increase or decrease the values. As for the example you can get a general idea that you can lean out the values by around 2% over the whole range. You do this to each column until you’re happy with your adjustments. You then clear out your data recordings and go back out on the road for another round of datalogging. You repeat these steps over and over until you have your tune at its target AFR and you feel your engine is running smooth and efficient. Next step after that is to take a look at your map through the either or both of the 2D and 3D graphs. You can look at the maps to make sure that the lines are a smooth transaction throughout the whole range, no jagged sharp jumps anywhere. If there is you can actually take the line and move it where you see fit. Then to be on the safe side, after you’ve adjusted the map go out and do some more datalogging.

Reminder, after you’ve made changes to your map always remember to upload those changes to your Ostrich 2.0 so they reflect in the actual changes in the way the car behaves.
 

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セックス大好&#
'93 240sex
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505 Posts
Awesome write up, one question though

Is CROME Honda specific? Or can i tune whatever i want with it
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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1,278 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Awesome write up, one question though

Is CROME Honda specific? Or can i tune whatever i want with it
Thanks! And not sure if you're serious or not but no CROME is Honda specific.
 

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Josh did a great job with explaining the basic start up here, but I need to point out, this is the basics for a stock to mildly modified motor. If you have injector size to change, if you are boosted, or even if you are higher compression than 11.5:1, then you need to adjust fuel trims and timing before you even think about turning the car on. If you are boosted, my general rule of thumb is to retard your motor atleast 1 degree for every lb of boost for below 8.5:1 cp ratio and 1.5 degrees for anything higher. If you are NA and high compression, pull 2-4 degrees from the entire map outside of your first 2 columns. It's a lot easier to start off entirely conservative and add timing back than it is to detonate and destroy a motor from the get go.

Also to add, I by no means recommend crome as the program of choice to anyone (neptune is my favorite), but tuning with anything is better than no tune at all.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the comments so far, I've added pictures to the thread in hopes it helps explains what I'm talking about. I unfortunately do not have screen shots of actual data logged values. As soon as I tune something else I'll be sure to add those screen shots to this to further explain the last part of the DIY better.

If you've liked what I've done please rep!
 

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Ill rep you. Good job on the write up and time spent making this so at least people will understand some of what goes on during the tuning process.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks everybody, I'd like to get a session of data logging on my laptop so I can finish with visual aids to help those understand the data logging part of tuning. And extract the data they need to use to properly change the values in their fuel maps.
 

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Sorry for the bump but i just would like to point out that Crome PRO doesn't have the quad cell option. ONLY single cell.
 

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93 Civic del Sol Si
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Discussion Starter #19
Sorry for the bump but i just would like to point out that Crome PRO doesn't have the quad cell option. ONLY single cell.
Thanks for the bump, but I assure you 100% that as of CROME Pro 1.6.5 it does indeed have the quad cell option. I used it, it's there I promise look at my screen shots above and you'll see the option for quad cell or even more.
 
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