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DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
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637 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know not everyone has a machinist straight edge in with the tools they own.

This is not the most accurate check But it should be close enough to help you decide if a MLS will seal or the block needs to come out and me milled flat.


Tools needed
20" or longer extension, 1/2 preferred.
Decent set of feeler gauges
.0015, .002, .0025, .003

Sharpie marker

A good know flat item, a piece of glass or mom's glass top table work best.


Pull out the .0015 feeler gauge.
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Lay the extension on the glass, make sure the square drive end hangs off the edge.


Take the feeler gauge, and check the extension for bow.
Spin the extension until you can not get the .0015 feeler gauge under it.
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Once the feeler gauge will not go under the extension, take the sharpie marker and mark the top.
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You are now read to check your block, head, intake mani or anything else you need for warp.



For Head gaskets
MLS if the .0015/.002 slides under, get the part milled, or go to a composite
Composite, if a .003 or more slides under, get part milled.

About any flange with a warp of .005 or more, needs closer inspection, and a good chance of being milled
 

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Two men shy of a group
99 civic sedan ex
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1,312 Posts
damn it i could have used this about two months ago, instead i bought some straight edges for a guitar from greece and it worked. great write up anyways thanks
 

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As a glassworker I can tell you a slight flaw here.

If the glass piece used has been tempered then 9 times out of 10 the tempering process causes the glass to bend and distort slightly...

Regular float glass will be perfectly flat, but I wouldn't trust a tempered piece for a head or block.

Telling them apart is very difficult, but tempered glass "should" have a stamp on it (its the rules.) With a pair of polarized glasses on, you can try to look at a corner and see if there are dark "burn marks" in the glass, this is a sure way to know that a piece is tempered, but you kinda need to know what you're looking for.
 

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DIY Guru
96 Ranger-stock
Joined
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637 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I just dont understand why you mark the .0015 spot with a sharpie?
Most long extensions have some sort of bow to them, all you are doing is trying to find the straightest part of the extension to use.

or buy a square from harbor freight for 5 bucks lol
That will work too, I would still advise to check it.

Ya why not just this lol. Im sure it has to be pretty damn straight but is something like that usable?
Yes it is, and the glass insert from the end table is too.

As a glassworker I can tell you a slight flaw here.

If the glass piece used has been tempered then 9 times out of 10 the tempering process causes the glass to bend and distort slightly...

Regular float glass will be perfectly flat, but I wouldn't trust a tempered piece for a head or block.

Telling them apart is very difficult, but tempered glass "should" have a stamp on it (its the rules.) With a pair of polarized glasses on, you can try to look at a corner and see if there are dark "burn marks" in the glass, this is a sure way to know that a piece is tempered, but you kinda need to know what you're looking for.
That I did not know.

Some of the how tos I do write are for the DIY'er, so I try to find common things that are common around the house.
 
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