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Discussion Starter #1
alright, i have a choice between autozone rings and a headgasket or oem rings and head gasket, the oem is a little more expensive and it'll have to be shipped to me. Would autozone stuff work? or should i get the oem stuff?
and when putting the engine together do i just loctite everything that bolts in? or is oil and torquing it to spec all i need? and about how much assembly lube will i need?
 

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racist-bigot-sexist-homophob
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What brand are the autozone rings? I've used hastings and NPR and both did fine for me. Honestly I wouldn't worry about it too much though. Just clock them the correct way and gap them correctly and you should have no issues.

I always try and torque everything to spec. Never used loctite on pressure plate or flywheel bolts but I know of some people that have. The fsm may be a better reference for an answer to loctite bc I don't recall ever using it and don't remember if the fsm ever calls for it or not.

Go to autozone and buy a bottle of assembly lube. That little bottle will get you through this one and many more.
 

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95 Solvic, 93 dS si
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oem for the headgasket. Never blown a OEM headgasket out, however I have blown out vatozones felpro sets.

vatozone sells "sealing power" rings, which I have no opinion of, I would rather go for NPRs or hastings however if I were doing it myself.

As far as loctite, the only bolts i really locktite are the flywheel (atleast red locktite) Ill usualy blue locktite the oilpan and oil pick up mount bolts. Everything else I use oil and torque to spec. Suspension components i use antiseize and torque to 5% over spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What brand are the autozone rings? I've used hastings and NPR and both did fine for me. Honestly I wouldn't worry about it too much though. Just clock them the correct way and gap them correctly and you should have no issues.

I always try and torque everything to spec. Never used loctite on pressure plate or flywheel bolts but I know of some people that have. The fsm may be a better reference for an answer to loctite bc I don't recall ever using it and don't remember if the fsm ever calls for it or not.

Go to autozone and buy a bottle of assembly lube. That little bottle will get you through this one and many more.
alright, i just bought some oem stuff online to be on the safe side. Cuz i dont know the brand that autozone sells. And you say they must be gapped correctly? like the gap when in the cylinder must be within spec? odd, because they know the diameter of the cylinder, why cant they make them with the correct gap?
and you dont suggest loctite on flywheel or pressure plate bolts? i've heard some people say to always loctite it, but w/e i suppose i'll just oil them and torque them to spec, i wont be revving high anyways.
 

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racist-bigot-sexist-homophob
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CMgogo is right. I have heard nothing but bad things about sealed power rings and wouldn't use those.

They have to be gapped because:

- Not everything is produced to the exact same specification. Manufactured products are usually made within an acceptable tolerance.

- Your particular application will dictate the gap of the rings

No I have never used loctite on flywheel and pp bolts.Always torqued them to oem spec and never an issue. Like I said though, I do know people that loctite them.
 

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First of all do not use lock-tight on anything......

Cleanliness and how its assembled will determine how long this thing will last, make sure everything is clean before assembling. Dont wipe parts off with linty rags, clean everything with soap/solvent+water and blow it dry with compressed air. Download the honda FSM online, search google. Make sure you have a good torque wrench that is calibrated properly. Plasti-guage your bearing clearances and check ring gap. Use OEM parts and seals. If your installing aftermarket forged rods, you will need to notch the block and possibly the girdle. Get the block and head checked for flat-ness with a precision straight edge and resurfaced if necessary.

What is this motor for? daily driver? you putting a turbo on it? If so i'd grab ARP head studs while its apart.

You dont need assembly lube, use motor oil and then prime the oiling system before you fire it up for the first time.

It sounds like you need to do some more homework before you build a motor. Dont rush into it or you will be doing it over again.
 
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