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ok guys ive search but couldnt find an answer?? to keep it a short story crashed my car and a/c was damage. now got the car running and want my a/c back. cuz summer time in cali is killer... so i got used a/c parts and now im ready to put freon into it... i dont want to pay so much at the shop and find out sumthing else is wrong with it.. so i was wondering if anyone has done this and if so would using this be any good??

http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductDetail.aspx?MfrCode=IDN&MfrPartNumber=MAC134&CategoryCode=3571B


Thanks

ninja edit- its a 95 civic w/ r134
 

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Auto Zone and other places rent those machines, right? My A/C isn't functional either, despite Duck's help with the refrigerent. Probably a leak somewhere...?
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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the vacuum cause the water to boil off at a lower temp, in a way like bleeding brakes.........

You'd also need a good set of gauges along with a pressure/temp chart and two thermometers.

It's been 23 years since I took HVAC, it's not that hard on older/simple systems.
 

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Happy LiL Trees....
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the vacuum cause the water to boil off at a lower temp, in a way like bleeding brakes.........

You'd also need a good set of gauges along with a pressure/temp chart and two thermometers.

It's been 23 years since I took HVAC, it's not that hard on older/simple systems.
Yep what he said, any moisture and it'll turn into an acid, and the compressor will eat itself.

When vacuuming, use a micron gauge, this will tell you if the system is fully dry or not and can indicate leaks in the system.

To find pinhole leaks, flourescent dye is put in with the freon, and a UV light is used to light any of the leaking oil.

The system can also be pressure tested w/nitrogen to 100 psi and watched for any losses and it's a drying agent at the same time.
 

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Pull the vacuum and make sure it holds, hold the vacuum for at least an hour, longer if possible, and charge the system. Run the system and check your temps, then evacuate it and pull a vacuum again for 10 minutes, more if you like, and recharge it. The first charge will soak up moisture the deep vacuum couldn't get and you will be good to go.
 

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Happy LiL Trees....
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Pull the vacuum and make sure it holds, hold the vacuum for at least an hour, longer if possible, and charge the system. Run the system and check your temps, then evacuate it and pull a vacuum again for 10 minutes, more if you like, and recharge it. The first charge will soak up moisture the deep vacuum couldn't get and you will be good to go.
That's flying blind homie, POE oils are highly hygroscopic, the only way to know if your dry is with a micron gauge in line when your vacuuming, when you shut off the pump and hold the vacuum, the gauge will show the micron level rise somewhat, but as long as it stays under a certain amount in 10-20 min you have a dry system. being lazy leads to a failure later and more $$$!
 

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I never had that gauge in class and that car is still running fine, I saw a 4* drop between the first and 2nd charge. A deep vacuum alone isn't going to get everything IMO.

Edit: I think I remember the tool you're talking about, and I used it once. I don't think most people are going to have access to that thing.
 

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If you really want to get that into it, he never said he got a new receiver/drier either, he really needs to pick up one of those since its been open for who knows how long
 

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Happy LiL Trees....
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I never had that gauge in class and that car is still running fine, I saw a 4* drop between the first and 2nd charge. A deep vacuum alone isn't going to get everything IMO.

Edit: I think I remember the tool you're talking about, and I used it once. I don't think most people are going to have access to that thing.
I totally agree that running freon thru will help clean it out, all i'm saying is if you really want to know what's happening inside an in-line micron gauge is the way to go. Getting access to one, I don't know for the OP.
 

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Brokedick Millionaire
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Pull the vacuum and make sure it holds, hold the vacuum for at least an hour, longer if possible, and charge the system. Run the system and check your temps, then evacuate it and pull a vacuum again for 10 minutes, more if you like, and recharge it. The first charge will soak up moisture the deep vacuum couldn't get and you will be good to go.
evac, vac, recharge, sounds like you've had access to a reclaim unit.......those weren't even thought of when I was in school.

Heck a styrofoam cup with R-12 or R-734 and throw it at someone.

Yep, I'm back to being a student here :)
 
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