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Discussion Starter #201 (Edited)
Good news! Block will be sent out for CSS on Monday! Took the weekend to get it cleaned up from notching, and lightly oiled the cylinders and put it in a box:



Also an update on the injector flow bench! And sorry to disappoint robgoof lol. I was going to go with a lower tech way of pulsing the injectors, but I found a relatively cheap way using electronic components from work haha.

BTW, my lower tech method was going to be using my spare P28 powered up with a switch mode power supply, hooked to a distributor that was run by a hand drill to give it RPM then use the normal injector drivers inside the ECM to control the injectors. This would have been bulky but doable, and was attractive because I already had all of these parts and was in the realm of me leading up to building a Honda OBD1 ECU bench tester, since the cool ones from Moates have been sold out and they don't appear to be making a comeback anytime soon.

For other work related reasons, I bought some stuff to test a few solid state relays on some of our equipment that seem to fail relatively quickly. So I bought $20 worth of stuff on ebay to create a high current (8-10A) adjustable PWM test bench. Here is what I just finished hooking up and proving out:

10PK of power transistors, some beefy MF rectifier diodes for voltage spike protection, a random solid state relay I had in my toolbox and a really neat Arduino based PWM generator. It has provisional for adjusting duty cycle as well as frequency, so it is very flexible for the $10 it cost!




The PWM profile of the arduino device is an on/off style signal with amplitude equaling that of the input DC power supply. So for 5V in, it outputs a 0-5V square wave. 12V in, it generates a 12V square wave.

The power transistors require 8V to turn on, so I dialed in my power supply to run at 12V.

I tested the PWM profile before connecting it to a transistor, was nice and very consistent:




The next step was to put a transistor in line and test low load carrying capability to turn on something like a simple incandescent test light:






Worked good. Played around with duty cycle setting as well:






Then came the fun part, punishing a relay to its limits:



It should work out well! When I get the fuel pump and tank setup, I will update again!
 

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Sloppy Jalopy
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I like the gif 's ...

neat little china box with display ,whats it called ,pwm do'er?looks usefull.clicked the hell out of that relay .

A pgmfi test bench is a beast of its own and am looking forward to the project ;)

what scope stufff do you use? software and hardware?not the mouthwash..
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Discussion Starter #204 (Edited)
I like the gif 's ...

neat little china box with display ,whats it called ,pwm do'er?looks usefull.clicked the hell out of that relay .

A pgmfi test bench is a beast of its own and am looking forward to the project ;)

what scope stufff do you use? software and hardware?not the mouthwash..
I literally went on Ebay and typed "pwm generator" and found the following:

Screenshot_20200218-190423_eBay.jpg


The output can't carry hardly any load with the transistors it uses internally, but should be ok to blink some low power LEDs though. That's the reason for going with some large load carrying transistors to actually turn some big stuff on!

Dude, I've wanted an OBD1 test bench for a while... just no motivation to build one yet because my stupid engine keeps breaking haha. Once I get some time, I would like to get one up and running, because the OBD1 ECUs are getting harder and harder to find in good working order. It would be nice if one broke, you could feed it some signals and attempt to trace a failure back down the board to replace easily failed components.

Scope stuff? Every automotive shop I've ever worked at has had good 4 channel oscilloscopes for people inclined enough to use them. I LOVE scopes, and couldn't quickly and properly pinpoint fixes without one.

I got scared when I moved from automotive to the heavy duty industry, because most HD shops and dealerships didn't have scopes. Some were optional equipment used as part of an OEM tool of some kind for a signal analyzer input for software to make a judgement call, but a free roaming scope that I could get my hands on and freely use was non existent.

Again, I went on ebay and started searching for automotive oscilloscopes. Typically I dont like having scopes with less than 4 channels, but I was broke and really stressing over the loss of one of my most important diagnostic tools. The closest, cheapest 4 channel automotive grade PC based usb oscilloscope with minimum of 500 megasamples per second was from Hantek at around 400 dollars. I had a 200 dollar budget, so their 2 channel 150MHZ bandwidth and 500M/S PC based usb scope was $165 shipped.

The software interface is definitely rudimentary compared to others I had gotten used to, but after spending a week with it and learning its quirks it quickly became my slightly retarded chinese best friend. I love it. This scope is plenty fast for everything I've needed to do for most jobs, and only having 2 channels hasnt been a terrible hinderance or inconvenience, especially in the HD diesel world. I would say a 4 channel in the automotive world is a bare minimum requirement for working with most modern cars, just due to the staggeringly large number of engine control sensors and vehicle electronics and actuators. Sometimes you have the need to see four electrical actions happen at the same time, but for my own personal usage at home or in the HD world, 2 channel has been perfectly fine. Where I work now, I have 8 channel scopes to play with if I really need it haha, so I dont worry too much about feeling detached from a scope anymore.

Hantek builds really good stuff, especially in their higher end equipment. The internals in my 2 channel Hantek are world class components, and would easily go head to head with anything in-class scope made from anywhere else. It's like anything from China, go through it with a fine tooth comb to understand what your getting into, and as long as your expectations aren't too high like your building medical equipment or space shuttles, they actually make some damn good tools.
 

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91 Civic SI hb
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Yeah there is super cool electronic dodats on ebay. Makes life about 500 times easier then say 15 years ago when you had to make them all your self.

Arduino's are also awesome for this stuff. And programing is easy and they can do wonders.
 

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93 Civic HB SI
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Discussion Starter #206
Made some pretty good progress on the car the past couple days.

Confirmed tracking with FedEx this morning that my block made it to New Hampshire.

Before I sent the block to CSS, I notched the block and used an old vitara piston and one of my rods to check for proper rod to cylinder clearance. Cleaned and washed the block, lubed some old bearing shells, popped em in the block and set a crank in there. The rod cleared every cylinder, first try!

Since that checked good, I finally put the Wiseco pistons on the rods:






After finishing up with that, I put up my popup tent in the driveway because it was raining, and got the new Walbro 400 installed:






Also went ahead and upgraded the fuel pump connector wires with 12 gauge and new spade terminals:






The pump is already supplied with 12 gauge from my remote relay block in the back of the car next to the battery, but this was the final stretch of harness left to modify to reduce any amperage bottlenecks to this new pump.


Because I'm running this larger Walbro, I actually went ahead and removed the second fuel pump and cooler setup from the car. With the volume this new pump is capable of, I didn't trust the cooler to be part of the return circuit. I don't want anything to interfere with fuel return to the tank, and having a filter and cooler, with an uphill push from under the car might not have be the best thing for it. I might test some theories out later, but for now I just want the car running. There are lots of guys out there running high HP with none of the fuel line and cooler complexity I put in place. I might decide to use the cooler in a different area of the car later on, but I am pretty sure removing it from the interior will be permanent:

 

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Discussion Starter #207
I also forgot to mention I called Geoff at Colt Cams last week wednesday looking for an update on my cam. He was literally just opened the package a few hours earlier and getting ready to put it in line to be worked on. He said it was next in line, and that another single cam D series was in front of mine :) Anyone currently getting any cam work done through Colt?

Also made some progress on the injector flow bench. Added my GSL392 civic secondary pump to this frame to use it as my test rig pump. Also got an inline fuel pressure gauge tee'd in. Just need to build a housing for the PWM control box, wire in a couple transistors and build a small simple harness to tie into the injectors:








I have moved on to headwork at this time, since I'm in a waiting phase while the block and cam are in limbo right now. I have a few things to get done for head work right that I can do while I'm waiting:
  1. Port and gasket matching intake and exhaust to the manifolds
  2. A light polish job
  3. Relap the valves
  4. Send head to machine shop to get cut and hot tanked
I built a rudimentary valve spring compressor tool using a clamp and an aluminum tube welded to some aluminum washers:



Also went ahead and made sure the BC retainers were going to work with the stock keepers. There's nothing that says they wont, but I was just checking just in case, they seated very well in the new retainers just by hand:






Before buying this BC spring and retainer kit, I read up on people using stock retainers with upgraded valve springs. Some seem to have no problems, others stated the "while your in there, you might as well..." line.

I found for these springs, I would NOT trust the stock retainers, just due to the fact that there is a significant difference in material from stock to BC retainer AND the stock one does not fully cover the entire face of the BC valve spring, it is actually a slightly smaller outer diameter, which probably comes from the BC springs being physically thicker spring steel material:










BC retainer on BC spring, and stock retainer on stock spring:




Retainers swapped between springs (you can see the lip of spring poking out with stock retainer on BC spring):

 

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Discussion Starter #208
Another thing I am going to do while the engine is apart, I'm changing intake manifolds.

With the head apart, I began taking some measurements and getting an idea of how much material I would be removing to accomplish a port match, when I noticed that my intake ports compared to my head ports were significantly smaller in diameter compared to the head ports. I believe this is from me running the Z6 manifold on the Y8 head. Even though the Z6 intake is much nicer and has a full port and polish, I believe it was port matched tothe Z6 head I have, not a Y8. I never even bothered to check this before, but I believe I will free up some HP by moving to the Y8 manifold and port matching these similar size ports together. I will port match the 65mm B18C5 throttle body I have to the Y8 manifold as well:








Just for giggles, I checked to make sure that trying to put a B16 intake on this head was indeed too much work to be feasible, it was haha.... I tried though!
 

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Discussion Starter #209 (Edited)
We are under a winter storm advisory in my area right now, and for whatever particular reason my neighborhood has somewhat frequent power outages.

Storm coming!




So I headed to my local gas station to fill up one of my generator backup gas cans I used recently in my truck, and I also brought my E85 carry can with me. I've been wanting to test my local area fuel station alcohol content, just to see what variations I have around me.




Science experiment time! Let's calculate ethanol content!

Step 1 - Fill a jar or clear container with some E85 that has graduation marks on it. I just used a small Mason jar. This is actually a really bad container for trying to be exact lol, so some level of accuracy deviation must be considered. Take note of the fill line mark. I filled to 50mL and kept the numbers even for simplicity reasons:




Step 2 - Use another small container or syringe with graduations, and fill this with water. I used a children's tylenol syringe that comes with the package. Add another even amount of water to the jar of E85. You want to add enough to the container so that when mixing, the alcohol will have had a chance to touch all the water, and separate the gasoline-mixed hydrocarbons from it. I added 50mL of water to the jar, bringing the total to 100mL. This also provides a bright view of separation:






Step 3 - Shake well, jack it, etc:




Step 4 - Let settle for about 5 minutes. Determine the volume of the upper line of separation. Mine happened to be around 16-18mL of separation:




The alcohol absorbs the water, and also causes the oily gasoline blend to separate from the mixture. The result is the alcohol/water mix is on the bottom, and the rough amount of gasoline content floats to the top.

Mixing the water into E85 actually lowers the overall total volume of the content in the jar by a few mL for some reason, has to do with the way the molecules get packed together in the E85 blend versus when both liquids are separated. When using a good graduated cylinder, you can actually see this better. My final overall volume is more like 96-98 mL in the jar (minus the visible liquid rolling up the top side of the glass, this effect is normal and is called the meniscus curve). There is also some non ethanol material left in the alcohol that can't be fully separated, so to calculate true ethanol content, a formula used by API, EIA and EPA needs to be applied:

Gasoline content = 2.1 + 1.94(final total volume - lower separated volume)

I believe these constant numbers are from the following:

2.1: The average percentage of denaturant added to ethanol to make it unfit for human consumption.

1.94: The average percentage of water contained in the ethanol that remains after refining, transport and storage. It is very difficult to remove all water from refined ethanol!



Simplify the function:

= 2.1 + 1.94(96mL - 80mL)
= 2.1 + 1.94(16mL)
= 2.1 + 31.04
= 33.14% total gasoline content in my sample


Then just do 100 - (gasoline sample total) = ethanol content:

= 100 - 33.14
= 66.86% ethanol

So at this one gas station, I really gathered E67, not E85.

Honestly, because of the terrible graduation estimations against my Mason jar, I probably have in all reality 67 - 70% ethanol in my jug.

This is an interesting topic, and I might just hook up my flex fuel devices to my injector flow bench and try cycling some of this E85 through it to see what the sensor determines as a test!

It is winter right now, so I do expect ethanol content to increase as spring arrives. This just goes to show that the E85 handle isnt pure E85!
 

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Discussion Starter #212
That's hilarious, all that info, and the eagled eyed viewers still always find the porn (including me) haha.

It's funny that the 18+ filter can't figure out innappropriate GIFs? Oh this just opened a door that I don't think the admins are aware of haha...
 

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Discussion Starter #213
Holy turn around time!

Block is already on it's way back from CSS, 4 day turn around! And cam should be here by end of the week, it has already cleared US customs.

Oh man, I was not expecting CSS to be done so quickly! Hopefully I can have my engine ready by end of March!

Next stages are machine shop to cut head and bore/hone cylinders and deck the surface.

The final piece I need is a cometic head gasket. The thickness will be determined after I've had a chance to clay the combustion chamber with the new pistons.

I also got an early birthday present haha, should be here by wednesday:

Screenshot_20200224-184744_eBay.jpg

Screenshot_20200224-184748_eBay.jpg

K Tuned B/D X series shifter. This shifter is badass! Throw and height are independently adjustable, and can be adjusted from inside the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #215
I also went and bought new Supertech valve keepers, since the full set was only 30 bucks:

Screenshot_20200224-231101_eBay.jpg

I wasn't going to, but with these new BC valve springs and retainers, honestly the stock keepers just looked tiny in comparison to the rest of the hardware, including these new keepers. I'm sure the stock keepers would do fine, but I feel a slightly better piece of mind with new keepers installed.

I also bought another 2.5" v-band flange. I miss the sound of the turbo spool noises pre-exhaust install, so in going to fab a small downspout to connect to the v-band on my downpipe that dumps towards the ground under the car behind the engine. This will give me the choice of running open downpipe or full exhaust, simply and easily. I would like to bring this small downspout with me to the dyno, just to throw on mid session to see what kind of power there is to be gained from dumping early rather than routed through full exhaust.

Another thing I'm going to fix is my downpipe transition joint, where it heads down from the turbo and turns an angle under the engine towards the back of the car. I seriously rushed this joint, and it has much more potential for better flow. So since I'm going through the trouble of port matching to take advantage of this new cam, I might as well fix this also.
 
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