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Meat Popsicle
91 CRX Si
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking into buying a TIG welder but my garage doesn't have a 220v plug. Because of the way my house it designed, running a 220 line from the outside meter box is next to impossible without tearing up the flooring on the second story. I can, however, run a dedicated 110v plug in the garage.

Looking at the miller diversion which allows multi voltage inputs. My questions, how much will I lose not being at 220v?

I'm not looking to weld thick materials...would be things like exhaust pipe and other small projects. Is it even worth it to buy a welder if it's not on 220?
 

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Never having used TIG, I can't really give an opinion on that. However, when it comes to MIG, I've noticed a huge difference. We have various welders at work, all of which I've used.

Our 120V is a pain. It's a good quality Miller welder, but it still sucks. I believe it has a 60% duty cycle. Controls on it don't allow for fine tuning. It's usually either too hot, or not hot enough, and the wire speed is either too fast, or not fast enough.

Our 480V Miller is badass. It's good for everything from thin gauge sheet to heavy plate and structural steel. Very easy to fine tune the settings. 100% duty cycle.


Granted, my experience is with MIG, but I've found with the higher voltage welders, you generally have more control, as the power supply to it is more consistent.
 

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Ferio inspired
90' Civic sedan
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where's your laundry room at then? is it close enough to get your power there?
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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Never having used TIG, I can't really give an opinion on that. However, when it comes to MIG, I've noticed a huge difference. We have various welders at work, all of which I've used.

Our 120V is a pain. It's a good quality Miller welder, but it still sucks. I believe it has a 60% duty cycle. Controls on it don't allow for fine tuning. It's usually either too hot, or not hot enough, and the wire speed is either too fast, or not fast enough.

Our 480V Miller is badass. It's good for everything from thin gauge sheet to heavy plate and structural steel. Very easy to fine tune the settings. 100% duty cycle.


Granted, my experience is with MIG, but I've found with the higher voltage welders, you generally have more control, as the power supply to it is more consistent.
noone's house is gonna have a 480V 3 phase supply to run a good 100% duty cycle big iron welder though!
 

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My civic
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Meat Popsicle
91 CRX Si
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Discussion Starter #7
where's your laundry room at then? is it close enough to get your power there?
Yes but I'd rather not deal with unplugging my dryer every time I want to weld.


Is it possible to purchase a generator along with the welder to run 220v?
I suppose so but that's more trouble than I'd like to go through.


Sounds like 110v sucks which may mean that I need to abandon the idea of buying a TIG
 

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the artist formerly known as drexelstudent11
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110V is fine for what you're trying to do though, exhaust pipes and small projects

but 220v is better for everything.
 

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1992 Civic Si
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I have an Everlast 185 TIG (Similar unit to the Diversion) and it's dual voltage also. I've only ever run it on 110v and it's plenty for automotive projects.

As for MIG, at work we have a lincoln mig pak 140 and it's great for zapping exhausts together.

The diversion is plenty of welder for any automotive enthusiast.
 

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I'd personally run a 220. If unplugging your dryer is the only headache the I'd just deal. I wonder if its possible to run a second 220 outlet off of the existing one for ease of access. Just don't run the dryer when wielding. Lol!
 

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As long as you are sticking to exhaust and other smaller stuff you'll be fine. If you want to get serious, stepping up to 220 is a must.
 

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I'd personally run a 220. If unplugging your dryer is the only headache the I'd just deal. I wonder if its possible to run a second 220 outlet off of the existing one for ease of access. Just don't run the dryer when wielding. Lol!
Most certainly.
 

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110v tig works decent. Ive used both miller diversion and the small ones they sell thats a scratch start on 110v and have welded some pretty thick stuff just fine

but you are def. limited yourself. You should get 230v wired into the garage, I did it myself cost me like 100 bucks and now I can run bigger air compressor, welders and other stuff that need 230v.
 

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Ferio inspired
90' Civic sedan
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Yes but I'd rather not deal with unplugging my dryer every time I want to weld.




I suppose so but that's more trouble than I'd like to go through.


Sounds like 110v sucks which may mean that I need to abandon the idea of buying a TIG



if you don't want to unplug your dryer, put your dryer outlet into a junction box and split power from there. not really a big job at all.
 

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On top of that, if you can rewire your garage/shop for only 220/240V, whatever you need 110/120 for, just take one leg and wire from that (double phase).

The best is 480V 3P, but it's expensive.
 

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an ej8 coupe
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I use an Eastwood tig 200 ac/dc. it uses 110v or 220v. my garage only has 110 and for most of my projects it works great. I weld a lot of aluminum as well as welding 1/8" wall stainless pipe for my turbo manifold. I have plenty of power for the stuff I weld at home. I occasionally take my tig into work to weld aluminum and have the benefit of a 220v outlet.
 

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Two men shy of a group
99 civic sedan ex
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I havent welded tig in like six years and that was highschool, but couldnt you crank up the heat to the highest setting (if it doesnt have fine tuning), and maybe pull the tungsten back into the cup a little further and have a longer arc to reduce heat if its to hot?
 

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Lifetime Awesome Member
'89 CRX HF
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25,544 Posts
I have used the Miller Maxstar 200 110v/220v on a 110v outlet and it welds about exactly the same as when it's hooked up to 220v. Difference is you are limited on amperage(which car stuff will not need high amperage) and duty cycle.

My advice would be to buy a quality dual voltage machine and run 110 until you can get 220 set up.
 
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